100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i I . IMER

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MG AZTNE PACM TTVlR

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY MA(~ATTNW I~Af~1~' ~W3

KMXJCO VIVM

In

i

COCK VAN GENT:
Dutch Artist Tells of Life in Mexico

Three years of working in south-
ern Mexico, living as the local In-
dians do have just ended for Cock
'- van Gent, a Dutch artist visiting
Ann Arbor this week.
Drawings done in Chinese ink and
bistre and oil paintings as well as
some work- in other mediums, now
being exhibited throughout the
country are the result of Mrs. van
Gent's Mexican sojourn.
An exhibit of about 25 of her
works will be on display later this
year at a local gallery on Martin
Pi.
"Any medium anyone leaves in
my house I will use sooner or
later," the Dutch born artist said.
Lived in Mexico
She and her husband chose San
Christobel, near the Guatemalan
border because the Indians in that
part of Mexico are not mixed with
the Spanish blood and "their fea-
tures are better, their faces more
beautiful," she explained.
The southern Mexicans are not a
friendly people according to the
van Gents. "At the beginning they
did not associate with us," but they
discovered that "we lived the same
way that they did," and grew to
like the Dutch couple.
Mrs. van Gent has been charac-
terized by critics as an abstract
expressionist. Although she has
worked with the German expres-
sionist Max Backman, she does not
agree with this or any of the other
labels art critics have given her.
An Early Italian'
Her work she says is most like
that of the early Italians. Her
drawings, a combination of opaque
black Chinese ink and the light
brown bistre technique once used
by Rembrandt, are a revival of a
very old medium.
The Dutch artist explained that
KA^Arv% A -

Art Show
Continuing the art season,
the Ann Arbor Art Association
will present its group show be-
ginning Tuesday and remain-
ing until Oct. 26, on the mez-
zanine of the Rackham gal-
leries.
A reception will be held from
8 to 10 p.m. Tuesday. The gal-
leries will then have regular
hours of 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Monday through Saturday.
The four artists whose works
will be on view are Barbara
Dorr, Milton N. Kemnitz, Cecil
North and Russell Steinke.
Prof. Frank Cassara of the
College of Architecture and De-
sign is chairman of the show.
Col. Maahs
To Lecture
Movie on New Guinea
To Open Series Today
Col. Arnold M. Maahs, noted so-
ciologist, author, lecturer and pro-
ducer, will show his film "New
Guinea, Isle of Adventure" at 3:00
p.m. today in Pattengill Auditor-
ium.
Filmed in color, the movie be-
gins this year's World Travel and
Adventure Series. Col. Maahs spent
more than six years in New Guinea
producing the movie, concentrating
mostly on a primitive part of the
island isolated from the rest by a
range of mountains.
Presenting the daily life of stone-
age man, Col. Maahs will show the
primitive methods of the farmers,
preparation for feasts and aborig-
inal arts and crafts. Both season
and single tickets will be available
at Pattengill Auditorium before the
program.
Six film-lectures will be present-
ed in the series, sponsored by Ann
Arbor Public Schools, Beta Sigma
Phi Sorority, Exchange Club and
Institute for Regional Exploration.
"Iceland, Capri of the North,"
with lecturer Robert Davis, will
be presented on Nov. 14. Also
scheduled for showing are "Quest
of the Lost Mission," Dec. 12,
"Across Tropical Africa," Jan. 9,
"Italian Interlude," Feb. 13 and
"Colombia Cavalcade," Mar 13.
Wide Range

Soprano Steber To Open Extra Concerts

By DAVID KAPLAN
Eleanor Steber, Metropolitan op-
era soprano opening the Extra Se-
ries Concerts tomorrow, is a col-
lector of conductor's batons.
Each baton signifies a "first
time" performance in her career,
beginning with the baton which was
used by Erich Leinsdorf in the pit
of the Metropolitan when Miss Ste-
ber made her debut as Sophie in
Strauss' "Der Rosenkavalier" on
Dec. 7, 1940.
Walter's Baton
There are two from Bruno Wal-
ter, one from a performance of Mo-
zart's "Requiem" and the other
with which he conducted Beetho-
ven's Ninth Symphony on his own
50th birthday.
Gothic Films
Set To Open

Other batons in her collection
were once used by: Arturo Tosca-
nini, Andre Kostelanetz, Howard
Barlow, Wilfred Pelletier, Serge
Koussevitzky, George Szell, Fritz
Reiner and Dimitri Mitropoulos.
After her debut in 1940, Miss Ste-
ber added numerous roles to her3
repertoire, among them: Micaela
in "C a r m e n ," Marguerite in
"Faust," Violetta in "La Travia-
ta," Donna Elvira in "Don Giovan-
ni," Pamina in "The Magic Flute"
and Eva in "Der Meistersinger."
Concert Performances
In addition to appearances at the
Met, Miss Steber has performed in
concert performances in Philadel-
phia, New York, Hollywood andt
Montreal.
Her first concert outside of theV
North American continent took
place in 1950 when she visited Ha-
waii for a week's performances.
Entirely American in training,
Miss Steber has made but one trip
abroad-in the summer of 1947 she1
appeared with the Glyndebournei

Radio and television have played
a vital parn her career. After her
opera debut, she began to appear
with sponsored radio shows and
appeared with Howard Barlow for
seven years. When the program
was first televised, Miss Steber
was the star, and she has since ap-
peared in more than 30 'telecasts,
In 1938, Miss Steber was married
to Edwin Bilby, a fellow student at
the New England Conservatory.
During the busy winter season in
New York, they live in a home
which was formerly the study of
Reginald de Koven, the famous
composer. Their permanent resi-
dence is Melodie Hill near Port
Jefferson, Long Island, where Miss
Steber engages in landscape gard-
ening, one of her favorite hobbies.
Miss Steber has recorded both
single records from her repertoire,
as well as complete recordings of
some Metropolitan Operas. She ap-
pears in the complete recordings of
"Madama Butterfly," "Cosi Fan
Tutte," "Faust" and Sigmund
Romberg's "New Moon."

ELEANOR STEBER
... Met Soprano

Series

Today

Opera in London and at the Edin-
burgh Festival with the opera com-
pany.

-Daily-Dick Gaskiil
DUTCH ARTIST, COCK VAN GENT, SHOWS EXAMPLES PF
WORK DONE WHILE LIVING AMONG INDIANS
IN SOUTHERN MEXICO

ivijae ii r
Show Opens
At Museum,
Nymphs and minotaurs, gods and
satyrs are featured in the exhibit
which opened Friday in the Muse-
um of Art Galleries of the Alumni
Memorial Hall.
"The Classical Motif" reflects the
influence of ancient Greek and Ro-
man art on contemporary Ameri-
can and European painters. The ex-
hibit, which is composed of 11
paintings, three drawings, and 21
prints, Includes such artists as
Braque, Chagall, Klee, Matisse,
Modigliani and Picasso.
The Museum of Modern Art col-
lected the exhibit, which will run
through October 29. It is hung in
the West Gallery.
A second exhibit, "French Paint-
ing at Mid-Century," is scheduled
to begin today. Gathered as a sur-
vey of current trends among the
r younger generation of painters, it
comprises 65 water colors by 23
artists.
The exhibit, organized by the
American Federation of Art, is on
display in the North and South Gal-
leries. The museum hours are 9-6
every day except Sunday, when
they are 2-5 p.m.

w
A
1
7
i

she never uses models. "I just look.
It's a matter of training," she said,
"to remember what you have
seen."
Wherever the van Gents are
staying they take houses which are
empty. "We have no furniture so
we need no servants," they ex-
plained.
In San Christobel, following the
Indian custom, they put a string
close to the ceiling and hung from
this anything that did not belong on
the floor. For beds they put sleep-
ing bags on top of doors raised
from the floor by bricks. The van
Gents, who visited the United
States for the first time in 1946,
currently have their headquarters
in a postoffice box in Post Mills,
Cleveland. 4
The couple have been away from
their native Holland since 1951
when the young artist was award-
ed a one year Cattherwood grant
which first brought them to Mex-
icvo.
Three Traveling Shows
In addition to exhibitions in the
Weyhe galleries in New York Mrs.
van Gent has three shows current-
ly travelling around the country.
Since their return from Mexico,
the couple has spent several weeks
travelling around the country ar-
ranging for displays and seeing
the work of American artists in the
localities they visited.
Commenting on paintings seen
in this area, Mrs. van Gent said
they had-seen more good paintings
of local artists around Ann Arbor
than in many other parts of the
country.
Prof. Lopez Praised
They cited the late Prof. Carlos
Lopez of the Architecture and De-
sign School as "a very good paint-
er."
Displays of the work of local ar-
tists in the auditorium of the Ma-
sonic Temple, sponsored by the
Dramatic Arts Center, also inter-
ested the couple.

Unlike her conception of her own
paintings as akin to that of the
early Italih~h school, Mrs. van Gent
said the tendency in the United
States today is toward abstract
painting.
Composer
To Lecture
Ralph Vaughn Williams, noted
British composer, will speak at
4:15 p.m. Tuesday in Auditorium A,
Angell Hall, in the course of a brief
lecture tour before he begins his
visiting professorship at Cornell
University.
On Tuesday, Vaughn Williams
will reach his 82nd birthday, and
to honor him the School of Music
has planned a program for tomor-
row evening in Auditorium A, An-
gell Hall.
The program will consist entire-
ly of compositions by Vaughn Wil-
liams. His works total nearly 200
songs,- hymns and choral works,
as well as seven operas, including
"Hugh the Drover," "Sir John in
Love" and "The Pilgrims Prog-
ress," four ballets and incidental
music for seven films.
Cultural Exhibit
To Close Today
The exhibition of "Cultural
Commodities" collected from iron-
curtain countries by Laurence H.
Scott, '55, ending today, will be
shown from 7 to 10 p.m. in the
West Gallery of the Rackham
Bldg.

Jean Cocteau's "Orpheus" will
open the 1954-55 season of the
Gothic Film Society at 8 p.m.eOct.
18 in Rackham Amphitheater.
Gothic Film Society, the only
local movie where smoking is per-
mitted, calls their current season
"Films of the Fantastic." Includ-
ed on the first bill will be "The
Name of the Capital is Warsaw,"
Venice film festival award winner
from Poland.
"Mad Wednesday" with Harold
Lloyd is scheduled for Nov. 15.
It will be followed by Poe's "Fall
of the House of Usher" on Nov.
29 and D. H. Lawrence's "The
Rocking Horse Winner" with John
Mills on Jan. 3.
"Destiny," directed by Fritz
Lang is slated for Jan. 24. Feb.
14, Gothic Films will present
"Zero de Conduite," directed by
Jean Vigo, Feb. 28, "The Crazy
Ray," directed by Rene Clair, and
April 11, "It's a Wonderful Life"
with Frank Capra.
"Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" with
John Barrymore is scheduled for
May 2. The season will finish
May 12 with "Metropolis" directed
by Fritz Lang.
Memberships are $5.00 for the
11 programs. They may be obtain-
ed from William Wiegand, direc-
tor of the society, 914 S. State,
by mailing a check or money order
with self addressed envelope.
Speech Lecture
"Hoosier Philosophy," a speech
by George Davis, director of Adult
Education at Purdue University,
will be sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Speeca at 4 p.m. Wednes-
day in Rackham Lecture Hall.

-
SEE AND HEAR THE TRUTH
ABOUT THE JUNGLE AND ITS FASCINATING PEOPLE
Enjoy the thrill of seeing the first feature-length color motion picture of the
region and native life beyond the forbidding mountains of New Guinea.
AN EXCLUSIVE DOCUMENTARY FILM NARRATED IN PERSON BY
COLONEL ARNOLD M. MAAHS
Sociologist, Author, Lecturer, Film Producer
DON T MISS THIS EXCITING OPENING PROGRAM OF
Ac 4World 4,TraveF a#w,
AT PATTENGI LL AUDITORIUM, 3:00 P.M. TODAY!
105 South State Street. Six Outstanding Film-Lectures, $4.00. Single Admission, $1.00.

I

n Exhibits

Current exhibits on campus in-
clude special historical collections,
French and classical painting, and
scientific drawings.
Rare books are on display at the
General Library, while the Michi-
gan Historical Collections in the
Rackham Bldg. features "Michi-
gan in Four Centuries."
Drawings from a scientific il-
lustrator's file can be seen at the
Museums Building. A loan exhibit
of Egyptian Antiquities is being
shown at the Kelsey Museum.

"r

7

Art Institute Opens New Exhibit

1
1
iR

"The Two Sides of the Medal-
from Gerome to Gauguin" will run
through Oct. 31 at the Detroit
Institute of Arts.
Also on display until the end of
October is "Work in Progress,"
which includes painting by Mark
Tobey and Lee Mullican, jewelry
by John Paul Miller, Robert von
Neumann, George Salo and Adda
Husted Andersen.
An exhibition of water colors
with Christmas themes, the 2nd
International H a11mark Art
Awards, closes Oct. 17. "Contem-
porary French Print-Making" will
be exhibited until Dec. 31. A col-
lection of 18th century porcelain

will remain on display through
Nov. 7 and work from the muse-
um's summer workshops, through
Nov. 1.
"They Were Five," a French
film, is slated for Nov. 2 as part
of the art institute's series, "Film
as an Art." It will be followed Nov.
23 by "April 1, 2000," a German
movie.
Short films of museum collec-
tions are scheduled for Dec. 11.
The first half of the series
will conclude with Swedish-made
"Sunshine Follows the Rain."*
All showings will be at 8 p.m.
in the museum auditorium.

A

Smooth, Effortless riding...
IMPORTED FROM ENGLAND
NBcMAN
Bicycles

1954-55 LECTURE COURSE - HILL AUDITORIUM
4
TICKETS FOR ALL INDIVIDUAL ATTRACTIONS
ON SALE TOMORROW -10A.M.
OPE IG"THE STRUGGLE
NUMBERDNASA
Discussed by one
TUESDAY of the greatest
American Military
8:30 P.M. leaders
General Mark Clark
Tickets: $1.25-$1.00-50c On Sale Tomorrow 10 P.M.
OTHER CELEBRITIES ON THE COURSE: Paul Douglas, Wendell Corey, Steve Bra-
die in "The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial," Oct. 22; John Dos Passos, Nov. 18; Dr.
Harry Schwartz, Dec. 7; Justice William Douglas, Feb. 24; Claude Rains, Mar. 18;
John Mason Brown, Mar. 28.
ONLY TWO MORE DAYS TO BUY SEASON TICKETS-$7.50, $6.50
SPECIAL STUDENT RATE.... $3.00
(Complete Course, Second Balcony, Unreserved)
c :._ _ ..U a.... .. ,...,. .. AI 4a I", ,ICI-L t1 - t1 0

F
a
t
I
1y,
III

I

I

$5

195

..MEMML

The very finest bike you can
o buy! 3-speed gear in rear
wheel hub gives a soft, easy
ride. Lightweight construction
1 Ain kehm ri nn ,..Ae 1I.,tr'

I

I

II

iI

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan