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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 1954 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I . PI-79

FRIDAY, OCTOBER1, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

im.lal S

.. ..

PAUR SEVEN

F

SNAPPED'M' 25 GAME STREAK:
Army Beat Pride of Michigan in'49,'50

Phi Chi, Nu Sigma Nu,

Win

(Second feature on the Army-
Michigan football series)

Ti

By PHIL DOUGLIS
Not only has Michigan never
beaten an Army football team, but
to add insult to injury it was a ca-
det squad that snapped the Wolver-
ines' greatest victory string of all
time at 25 games.
The scene was the Michigan Sta-
dium-the date, Oct. 9, 1949. Blan-
chard and Davis were gone from
the Army team, a team that had
-already whipped the Wolverines
twice before. But in their place
were names such as Galiffa, Steph-
enson, Foldberg, and others.
The Wolverines had bowed to the
Blanchard-Davis teams just two
years before, and now it was the
Maize and Blue that was ranked
number one in the nation. The
great .Chappius-Elliott-Weisenberg-
er team was just one year out of
school, and the remnants still left
M i cigan with unquestionable
strength. Ninety-seven' thousand
fans Jammed the big bowl to the
brim to see the fray.
Michigan's star Chuck Ortmann
was injured on the third play of
the game, and the Wolverines sud-
denly found themselves without a
passing attack. The desperate Ann
Arborites were soon trailing, as the
Blaik machine marched down the
field easily to score. Again, early
in the second quarter, Army tal-
lied, as Michigan fumbled deep in
its own territory and the Cadets
recovered. Jim Cain raced over
anli the huge crowd was heartsick.
But the second half saw Michi-
gan come out with blood in its
eye. The Wolverines marched right
down the field, and moved to with-
in seven points of the Cadets as
Don Dufek plunged over in the ear-
ly moments of the last period. But
the joy was short lived. Army man-
power paid off, and the Black
Knights rolled for two quick touch-
downs, and Michigan's bid for its
26th straight game was smashed.
The big blue scoreboard read,
Army 21, Michigan 7.

Opening I-M Grid Contests
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ball got underway this afternoon
beneath grey, humid skies, but the
humidity apparently had little ef-
fect on scoring ability.
Phi Chi must have found the
weather invigorating. It rolled up
a total of 26 points to its opponent
Alpha Kappa Psi's zero. John
Fushman was the big man for Phi
Chi, catching two touchdown pass-
es, and running back a pass inter-
ception for a third marker. Bob
Clark was the receiver on the
MSC' Works
On Passing
EAST LANSING (P)-Michigan
State's passing attack hasn't been
forgotten while the Spartans have
been laboring on the defense this
week.
Football Coach Duffy Daugh-
erty has been rehearsing quarter-
backs Earl Morrall and Johnny
Matsock in the throwing game as
he prepared the team for Wiscon-
sin.
"We've always depended on for-
ward passing to loosen up the op-
ponent's defense," Daugherty said.

MICHIGAN'S DON DUFEK brings 70,000 Yankee Stadium fans to
their feet on Oct. 14, 1950, as he scores in the first quarter for
the only Wolverine tally in a 27-6 defeat at the hands of Army.

One year later found the two
teams at it again, but this time the
scene was switched to mammoth
Yankee Stadium in New York City,
where 70,000 fans roared in glee as
the Army streak was hiked to four
straight over the Wolverines.
However, it was Michigan's turn
to cheer first, as Chuck Ortmann
and Don Dufek led an early blitz-
krieg that added up to a 6-0 Maize
and Blue lead. An upset was in the
air.
But as in the past, the thunder-
ing Black Knights of the Hudson
picked up steam, and with Bob
Blaik, Vic Pollard, and Art Pol-
lack leading the attack, the Army
stormed back for four touchdowns,
and Michigan threw in the songe.
Four times Michigan had met
Army, and four times the strains
of "On Brave Old Army Team"
rang out victoriously. Four times
the scrappy Wolverines had dared

to defy the gridiron lords of the
east, and four times they had been
put in their place.
Saturday the teams meet for a
fifth time, before nearly 75,000 in
the Michigan Stadium. Will the
crew of Baldacci, Branoff, Kramer
and company end the Blaik jinx, or
will the cadets once again hang
Wolverine skins in their long, grey
barracks? Only time will tell.
(Next Week - Iowa)

fourth touchdown, taking an aerial
from Bill Lukash.
In a closer game, Nu Sigma Nu
used the passing of John Hess and
the receiving of Rae Johnston to
advantage for two of its three
touchdowns, as it defeated Phi Del-
ta Epsilon 20-6. Then, in a quick
reversal, Johnston passed to Hess
for TD number three. Good defen-
sive play on the parts of former
Michigan end Harry Allis, and his
teammates Charlie Avery and Dick
Reilly limited a good Phi Delt team
to one touchdown.
Alpha Rho Chi Wins
Alpha Rho Chi shut out Alpha
Kappa Kappa with a two TD at-
tack,12-0. A twenty yard jaunt
around end by Ken Ball brought
the first score for Alpha Rho, and
a pass play covering 45 yards,
Stan Bohinc to Elton Robinson
brought the second and final mark-
er.
A determined Phi Delta Phi elev-
en broke a 6-6 tie with Phi Alpha
Delta in the last thirty seconds to
take a close 13-6 win. The Phi Al-
pha squad drew first blood early
in the game, but held the lead for
only a short while. A few minutes
later Phi Delta Phi tied it up at
six all. The score stayed that way
up until the closing seconds of
play, when a Phi Delt pass, Doug
Cutler to Irv Stenn, connected for
paydirt and victory. The extra
point, on a pass from Tom Wilson
to Cutler, was good.
The other two professional fra-
ternity games were won on for-
feit, as both Delta Sigma Pi and
Phi Rho Sigma failed to show up
on time, losing respectively to Phi
Alpha Kappa and the Law Club.
In a play-off of a postponed so-
cial fraternity game, the passing
and running of Herb Zarrow led
Alpha Epsilon Pi to a 20-0 victory
over Phi Sigma Delta. Zarrow gal-
loped twenty yards to score the
first Alpha Epsilon touchdown, and

..

passed to Mary Gersuk for the ex-
tra point. Zarrow had set up the
TD with an interception. Zarrow
threw twice more for touchdowns,
connecting with Don Mazin, and
hitting Gersuk again for the final
TD.
Faculty Golf -
Tourney Set
The first faculty intramural
event of the year will be the An-
nual Fall Faculty Golf Tourna-
ment.
Play will include both individual
and three-man team competition.
However, players must enter as a
three-man team if they wish to
compete in the team tournament.
Play will be 18 holes, winter rules,
at the University Golf Course. Play
will begin October 3 and must be
completed by October 10. Greens
fees will be waived for contestants.
To enter, contestants should call
the IM Sports Department (8-8109)
or stop in and leave their name, de-
partment, and phone number be-
fore .beginning play. At the con-
clusion of their 18 holes, contes-
tants should sign the scorecard and
turn it in at the desk in the club-
house.
World Record
COPENHAGEN, (-Denmark's
Gunnar Nielsen equalled Mal Whit-
field's world record of 1:48.6 for
880-yards yesterday in a race with
Norway's Audun Boysen.
The two outstanding Scandina-
vian runners had hoped to break
the American's world standard.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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(Continued from Page 1)
Monte Irvin was scheduled to be
the next batter but Durocher need-
ed no prompting. One look down
the bench and it was Dusty strid-
ing from the dugout with a load
of bats.
The 27-year-old outfielder from
Deatsville, Ala., rose to the occa-
sion for the second straight day.
He fouled off Wynn's first pitch,
looked at a ball and fouled off two
more before he dunked a soft Tex-
as League single into short center.
Doby Playing Too Deep
jDoby was playing deep for this
home run threat and got a slow
break on the ball. He gave it a
good hustling try but couldn't
make the catch, Mays scoring from

second as Doby threw to third in a
vain try for Thompson. Before
things settled down, Rhodes was
on second base.
With men on second and third
and none out, Wynn was deep in
trouble. He struck out Dave Wil-
liams and walked Wes Westrum on
four straight pitches.
Antonelli hit a roller toward sec-
ond baseman Avila that looked
like a double play ball. It wasn't
quite hard enough and Avila was
able to get only catcher Wes Wes-
trum home with the tie-breaking
run.
Giants in Terrific Position
With this second straight under
their belt, the Giants are in a ter-
rific position to win their first Se-
ries since 1933. In all Series his-
tory, only one club ever has lost
the first two games and then
bounced back to win.
The Giants were the club. They
dropped the first two to the New
York Yankees in 1921 and bounced
back to grab the championship, 5-3.
That was in the days of the best-
of-nine series before they shifted
to seven games.
Two Giant Steps
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AB
Smith, if ...... 4
Avila, 2b *..... 4
Doby, cf ...... 5
Rosen, 3b...... 3
b-Regalado, 3b. 1
Wertz, 1b ......3
Westlake, rf .. 3
Strickland, ss .3
c-Philley,.....1
Dente......... 0
Hlegan, c ....,.. 4
Wynn, p .......2
d-Majeski .... 1
Mossi, p . .... 0

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0
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1
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3
2
2
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5
3
1
0
0
7
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0
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A E
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2 0
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1 0
0 0
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1. LIBERACE
Cucaracha Boogie
The Doll Dance
2. ROSEMARY CLOONEY
The Lady Is A Tramp
I'll Be Around
3. ARTHUR GODFREY
Lazy Bones
Shoo; Fly; Don't Bother Me
4. DORIS DAY
I Love The Way You Say Goodnight
I Went A-Wooin'
5. FRANKIE LAINE
Keepin' Out Of Mischief
NEW!
13. THE PHILADELPHIA
ORCHESTRA
Eugene Ormandy, cond
Smetana: The Bartered Bride
1. Polka
2. Dance of the Comedians
14. ROYAL PHILHARMON
ORCH ESTRA
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Beecham, Bart.
Tchaikovsky: Nutcracker Suite; Op. 7
1. Russian Dance (Trepak)
2. Chinese Dance
3. Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy

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I Can't Give You Anything But Love Do
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Now Is The Hour Wo
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Close Your Eyes 11. LE
We Mustn't Say Goodbye ant
8. HARRY JAMES Jos
and his Orchestra Ea
Stompin' At The Savoy (Part I) .12. DU
Stompin' At The Savoy (Part 11) ant
9. DAVE BRUBECK QUARTET Pr
Don't Worry 'Bout Me (Part 1) B;
UNRELEASED! MASTERWORKS PERFOR)
Massenet: The Last Sleep Of The Virgin Me
15. ANDRE KOSTELANETZ 18. RL
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Tchaikovsky: The SleepingBeauty-
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1. Introduction (Allegro vivo)2
2. Dance Scene (Entrance of the Fairies)
IC 16. ALBERT SCHWEITZER 1. AChi
Bach: Organ Preludes Dr
as 1. Ein' Feste Burg Ist Unser Gott No
2. Gottes Sohn Ist Kommen; M
13 Sei Gegrusset Jesu Gutig 20. ZII
17. ISAAC STERN, violin Ar
A. Zakin, piano Pa

n't Worry 'Bout Me (Part 1I)
NNY GOODMAN
di his Orchestra
lverine Blues
u're Right -'m Wrong f
:S ELGART
i his Orchestra
sephine
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JKE ELLINGTON
d his Orchestra
imping For The Prom
Sharp Boston
MANCES
oussorgsky: Hopak (Arr. by Rachmaninoff)
'avinsky: Berceuse from "Firebird Suite'
JDOLF SERKIN, piano
;hubert: Moments Musicaux; Op. 94
1. First Movement: Moderato
2. Third Movement: Allegro moderato
Fifth Movement: Allegro vivace
4NA RUSSELL
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21. PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA Second Movement: Andante con moto 24. ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano
OF NEW YORK (Conclusion) Aida: Ritorna Vincitor
Josef Stransky, Conductor 22. CELESTINA BONINSEGNA Pagliacci:Ballatella
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 In C Minor Soprano 25. AL JOLSON, with Guy Lom-
Second Movement: Andante con moto Bellini: Casta Diva from "Norma" bardo and His Royal Canadians
(Beginning) Bellini: Bello A Me Ritorna from "Norma" CLAYTON, JACKSON
PHILHARMONIC-SYMPHONY 23. MARY GARDEN, Soprano & DURANTE
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