100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 29, 1954 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE TWO

THE MCBMAN UATT.V

,.

FWU~ M WIE~A1V lb A VT.~T
-- a.as ~a...5., in, flA aaa,

WED±NESDAY, EPTMBR 19~Z, IM

'.

"OUTSTANDING":
Prof. Sinnott Receives
Metal Society Award

Prof. Maurice J. Sinnott, of the<
engineering college has been noti-
fied that he is to be awarded $2,-
000 by the American Society for
Metals.
Established by the Society in
1952, this award is presented an-
nually to three, or in some cases
fewer, outstanding teachers in the
metallurgical profession. Those
receiving the award may not be
more than 40 years old.
Relaxed and unassuming, Prof.
Sinnott conversed across a desk
top which was more than partly
obscured - by various papers and
texts. "Although I was vaguely
aware that I had been recom-
mended it was still a surprise when
I picked the letter out of the mail,"
he said.
Colleagues Not Surprihed
If Prof. Sinnott was surprised,
his colleagues were not. They
were unanimous in declaring that
his interest in his students was a
24-hour concern, and' that his
willingness to aid others was ex-
ceptional. These are certainly
statements with which Prof. Sin-
nott's students will concur since
he was not only nominated for the
award by colleagues and associates
but by former pupils as well.
The professor, a Detroit native,
was appointed an instructor at the
University in 1944 and received
his Doctor of Science degree here
in 1946.

PROF. MAURICE J. SINNOTT
During his teaching career he
has, initiated a course on the
structure of solids which is a part
of the Engineering College's cur-
riculum. At the present time he is
on sabbatical leave, working on a
text which will be used in this
course.
He will receive his award on,
Nov. 3 in Cleveland where the
American Society for Metals will
hold its annual meeting. As for
uses of the money, Prof. Sinnott,
who is married and the father of
four, replied, "That won't be any
problem."

Seniors
Seniors may sign up for 'En-
sian pictures from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. today on the diagonal, and
from 3 to 5:30 p.m. at the Stu-
dent Publications Bldg.
Pictures are being taken now
at the Student Publications
Bldg.
ErtugTells
Of Turkish
Universities
By MARY ANN THOMAS
"Michigan students have many
more chances to meet their pro-
fessors and teachers in classes
than Turkish students have," com-
mented Hasan Refig Ertug, Secre-
tary-General of the University of
Istanbul, Turkey.
"In Turkey, classes are more
crowded due to a great shortage of
teachers so the students have less
chance to become acquainted with
their teachers," Ertug explained
in an impromptu interview during
his short visit to the University
yesterday.
Touring a variety of American
universities for six weeks, the edu-
cator is visiting the United States
under the auspices of the State
Department's International Edu-
cational Exchange Service as a
participant in the Service's For-
eign Leader Program.
Describes Post
Ertug explained that his posi-
tion has no counterpart in Am-
erican universities but is a collec-
tion of several. Responsible only
to the Rector (President) and the
University Senate, Ertug is in
charge of administration, finan-
cial problems, admission, person-
nel and student affairs.
Also a professor of journalism
and a staff member of one of Tur-
key's largest newspapers, Ertug
was guest-lecturer in a journalism
class under Prof. Wesley Maurer,
chairman of the Department of
Journalism.
Other features of his tour of
the University included meeting
Prof. Harold M. Dorr of the poli-
tical science department, Erich A.
Walter, Assistant to the President,
Prof. Maurer and T. Hawley Tap-
ping, General Secretary of the
Alumni Association.
Turkish Schools Theoretical
Comparing Turkey's oldest and
largest university with American
colleges, the soft-spoken professor
explained that although the curri-
culums were essentially the same,
Turkish universities were more
theoretical.
"I admire the practical experi-
ence American schools offer in
labs, in technical training and in3
preparation for the professions,"
Ertug commented.
Founded in 1453, the University
of Istanbul consists of six colleges
and schools, ltierature science,
medicine, law, economics, forestry,
dentistry, pharmacy and foreign
languages. Of the 14,000 enroll-j

(Continued from Page 1)
The yard is often used for dance
recitals, floor shows, concerts and
other festivities.
Large Dinner
After classes we wander slowly
back to our residence, window
shopping as we go. Dinner is serv-
ed at 2 p.m. and everyone is starv-
ed by then. "Almuerzo" is the main
meal here and begins with sar-
dines, "chorizo" (Spanish variety
of sausage, greasy but good) and
tomatoes, followed perhaps by a
"tortilla" of potato and egg, or
"paella," a combination of rice,
sausage, meat, seafood and pimen-
toes.
One can't miss having potatoes
or rice twice during the meal and
fish at least once. With the sea so
near, all types of salt water fish
are popular, including clams,
shrimp, squid, octopus and even
eel. Fruit is the unvaried dessert.
Afternoons are usually filled by
dancing or singing classes. Either
Spanish rhythm is difficult, or our
group is unmusical. Also during
the afternoons we take excursions
to nearby places of interest such
as a hard-cider factory, where we
were offered all we could drink at
the tour's end, churches and the
cathedral of Oviedo and to the
sandy beaches on the Mar Canta-
brico.
World-famous Caves
We have also visited the world
famous caves of Altamira and
Candamo, where there are pre-
historic drawings of bison, horses,
elephants and reindeer.
III n A IT T Ik 11 1il

One afternoon was spent with
some Italian, German and Span-
ish boys in a "Siderial." The fas-
cinating element was watching
the waiter pour the hard cider. In
Oviedo it is the custom to stand
with one hand holding the bottle
high in the air and the other hand
holding the bottle at arm's length.
Then a quick flip of the wrist and
the liquid hits the glass. (Most of
;he time, anyway!)
Afternoon
Around 6 p.m., we take time out
for the popular Spanish custom of
tea and pastries. The French pas-
tries have nothing on the Spanish!
We eat as much as we want for
about ten pesetas, or 25 cents.
But by 10 p.m., we must be at
home, "for nice Spanish girls
don't go out after supper. Fortu-
nately, the Festival of Asturias has
coincided with our stay here.
Chaperoned by a professor or
older person, we may go to the bal-
let, theatre, opera or concert.
Sunday, after six days of class-
es, usually brings an all day ex-
cursion. One such trip was given
to our group by the Government.
We were taken to a seaside resort
for dinner (including squid!) and
a swim.
We were told that this inn was
strictly for the poor Spanish work-
ing man and his family, who pay
only 25 cents daily for room and
meals.
We later found out that those
who could actually afford the inn
were people a far cry from the lev-
el of the Spanish laborer.
T T1 ? T? T in r 1 m-T

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
SMALL GOLD CROSS. Call Alma Ditt-
rich. NO 3-1561, 4027 Stockweil. )6A

LOST: Black leather hand tooled1
fold. Finder may keep money
please return papers. Call 5858
da. ,YO 3-1561.

bill-
but
Jor-
) 8A

Spanish University Routine
Described by 'U' Student

FOR SALE
SIAMESE KITTENS. 10 weeks old.
Phone NO 2-9020. )46B
SHARP OFFER. Hericules English bike,
gear, hand brakes and basket. Can
be . seen evenings at 453 Church
Street, Apt. 4. )47B
For the Bestes
See Herb Estes
1946 Dodge, 4 door, nice con-
dition .................. $295
1947eFord, 4 door, radio and
heater................$295
1949 Chevrolet Station Wagon.
.. ......' ..'$595
1948 Nash, 4 door ,nice shape.
...........................$295
Every used car backed by a 6-months
warranty. Oil change and grease
job with every purchase. Open
evenings.

FOR SALE
1947 NASH, four door sedan, excellent
condition, a real buy. Call NO 8-8412.
)22B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1946 HUDSON four door, radio and
heater. $100. 1946 Chrysler, radio,
heater, fluid drive, $1.50. Fitzgerald-
Jordan. 607 Detroit. NO 8-8141. )17B
1948 PLYMOUTH CLUB COUPE. Green.
Real clean car. See Smitty. Huron
Motor Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO-
2-4588. )13B
1949 MERCURY SEDAN. Four door
green, radio, heater and over-drive.
Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )15B
STANDARD PICA typewriter. Good con-
dition. Reasonable, 830 S. Main. )21B
FOR RENT
27 FOOT HOUSE TRAILER for rent.
Car necessary. Can be seen at Cozy
Corner Trailer Park, "after 4 p.m.
2700 S. Wagner Road. )4C
CAMPUS APT. for four men. Furnish-
ed two 1edroom apt. $140. Inquire
518 E. William. NO 3-8454. )3C
ROOMS FOR RENT
GRADUATE WOMAN wanted to share
apartment with two other women.
Call NO 3-1416 after 6 p.m. )7D
WANTED: ONE STUDENT to share two
basement rooms with two others. Re-
frigerator, $7. 1001 S. Forest.- Call
NO 2-7639. )6D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now at the Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 EB. William (near
State St.) Ph. NO. 3-8454. )3D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now. Student Room
Bureau. No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
ROOM AND BOARD
MEN - HERE IS your solution to your
boarding problems. Good food. Low
prices. Number of meals per week
optional. Close to campus. 808 Tap-
pan. Call NO'3-8581. )2E
BOARD - MEN IN Southeast campus
area. Try us for the best home-cooked
meals in town! All three meals or
any combination. Liberal board cred-
it arrangement. Breakfast 30c, lunch
60c, dinner $1.20, Sunday dinner $1.25.
1617 Washtenaw, for info call NO
3-5806, ask for house manager. )3E
HOME COOKING for men. Well bal-
anced meals. Rebates. 1319 Hill St.
Call NO 2-6422. )4E
PERSONAL

BUSINESS SERVICES
BABY SITTING in my home during
football games:. 1317 Packard, just
4 blocks from the Stadium. Call NO
8-8608. )71
RAD I O-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
"Student Service"
1 blocks east of East Eng. )481
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN, re-
search member of the National As-
sociation of Teacher's of Singing,
author of "Emergent Voice," class
and private lessons in singing and
speaking. Studio, 715 Granger. Phone
NO. 8-6584. )31
STUDENTS! CONTINUE YOUR PIANO
study at college under experienced
teachers. Practice facilities avail-
able. THE ROBERT DUMM STUDIOS.
Phone NO 2-3541. 11
DO YOU WANT a new dress made,A1-
terations, or hems. turned up? Cal
NO 3-0783. )21
MISCELLANEOUS
TRANSLATORS with scientific or tech=_
nical background needed from time
to time. Polish needed immediately.
Leave name with Mrs. Lotze. Gall
NO 2-1871 after 4 P.M. )4L,
World Serious?
Catch up with events by reading:
Life (8c each)........... $4 year
Newsweek (6c) ............$3 year
Sat. Eve. Post (10c) .. $3.50 (8 mos.)
Time (6c)...............$3 year
US News (71&)........ $327 year
or any of the 3,000 other mags that
we carry. Phone orders to Student
Periodical, NO 2-3061; days, eves, Pay
later.
REAL ESTATE
5 ROOMS, BATH, 10 blocks from cam
pus, vacant, can be purchased - on
your terms. Phone NO 8-415, Ferris
Realtor. )288
VERY ATTRACTIVE 4 room; bath, year
round home at Whitmore Lake. Im-
mediate possession. very easy terms.
Call NO 8-6415. Ferris Realtor. )27B

'4

E1 flErS

Events Today

r

Engineering Seminar
The first of a series of weekly
seminars for senior and graduate
students in the College of Engineer-
ing will be held, at 4 p.m. in Rm.
311 West Engineering Bldg.
The problem of finding correct
jobs and of transition from school
to the industrial world will be key
topics of the meetings.
Guest speaker will be Dean
George G. Brown, of the College of
Engineering who will speak on
"Finding the Right Job."
* * .
World University Service
The World University Service will
I - p -I Gijo

hold an organizational meeting at
7:30 p.m. in Lane Hall.
Plans for a bucket drive which
the group plans to hold at the end
of October will be discussed.
* * *
Chemistry Lecture
The chemistry department will
sponsor a lecture at 8 p.m. in Rm.
1300 Chemistry Bldg.
Guest speaker will be George H.
Morrison who is Research Supervi-
sor of Sylvania Electric Products,
Inc. The subject of Morrison's ad-
dress will be "Radiochemistry and
Semi-conductor Research."
* * *
Union Opera
Committee tryouts for the 1955
Union Opera will be held at 4 p.m.
today and tomorrow in room 3-G
of the Union.
Both men and women are invited
to attend this meeting for produc-
tion and promotion positions in this
year's Opera.

IJARYA WfiICIAL IEILLE1ILN

503 . Huron

NO 2-3261

?M

- if

JACK WEB
as SGT. JOE FRIDAY in the
first feature-length produc-
tion of
DRAGNET"
WARNERCOLOR

ENDING TONIGHT
In the wonder ca
4-Track High3
Fidelity. Directional-5.-
STEREOPHONIC SOUND ." :'?%.";:.
CELEBRA D
S E DELLE
} LER
uCOMES TO LiF
f.M lORby DE:' W

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication init is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday).
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1954
vol. LXV, No. 8
Notices
RECREATIONAL SWIMMING HOURS
WOMEN'S SWIMMING POOL
For Women Students only:
Monday through Friday 5:10-6:00
Monday evening 7:15-9:15
Tuesday and Thursday evenings 8:15-
9:15
Friday 2:30-4:30
Saturday morning 10:00-12:00
Co-Recreational Swimming:
Saturday evening 7:15-9:15
Sunday 3:00-5:00
Family Nights:
Friday evening 7:15-9:15
Sunday evening 7:15-9:15
Faculty: For 1955-56 the Basic College
of Michigan State College will have, in
addition to Graduate Teaching Assist-
antships, two half time instructorships
in the Board of Examiners available at
a stipend of $2,000. These are designed
for present members of college staffs
who would like to spend a year work-
ing on some problem in evaluation of
interest to their institutions. Duties
for the Basic College will demand only
half-time. Those desiring information
should write to the Dean of the Basic
College, Michigan State College, East
Lansing, Michigan.
Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Students:
Students who had their recommenda-
tions completed during the last aca-
demic year, and who will desire to have
further recommendations sent this year,
are to contact the Preprofessional Sec-
retary in Room 1213 Angell Hall and
notify her of their intentions. Addition-
al copies of the recommendations can
then be prepared. This will expedite
matters for both the student and the
office.
Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental students:
who expect to apply for 4dmission to
a professional school for the Fall of
1955:
The University has an evaluation
system which is acceptable to all
American Medical and Dental schools.
Both the University Medical and Den-
tal schools require applicants from
within the University to use this plan

exclusively. Students who wish to ap-
ply to other professional schools should
also make use of this system. The plan
was designed to reduce the burden of
both students and the faculty mem-
bers in requesting, and answering, per-
sonal recommendations. Students may
obtain a brief mimeographed explana-
tion of the system in Room 1213 An-
gell Hall, and make an appointment
there with the preprofessional adviser.
Catalogs and mhterlal are on hand on
all the approved Medical and Dental
schools.
Applications for Grants in Support of
Research Projects:
Faculty members who wish to apply
for grants from the Research Funds to
support research projects should file
their applications in the Office of the
Graduate School by Fri., Oct. 8, 1954.
Application forms will be mailed on re-
quest, or can be obtained at Room 1006
Rackham Building, Ext. 372.
Applications for Summer Faculty
Research Fellowships:'
Faculty members who wish to apply
for Summer Faculty Research Fellow-
ships for the Summer Session of 1955,
may secure application forms from the
Office of the Graduate School, Room
1006 Rackham Building, or the forms
will be mailed on request. These appli-
cations should be filed in the Office of
the Graduate School by Fri., Oct. 8,
1954.
Medical College Admission Test: Ap-
plication blanks for the November 1 ad-
ministration of the Medical College Ad-
mission Test are now available at 110
Rackham Building. Application blanks
are due, in Princeton, N.J. not later
than Oct. 18, 1954.
Academic Notices
Dr. Hirsch Hootkins, language exam-
iner for the Graduate'School, will dis-
cuss the Ph.D. language requirements
and examinations with all students in-
terested on Thurs., 7:30 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheatre.
The make-up exam for the Botany 1
course of spring semester, 1954, will be
given on October 5 at 7:30 p.m. in room
2004, Natural Science Building.
Geometry Seminar: Wednesday, Sep-
tember 29, at 7 p.m., in Room 3001 An-
gell Hall. Prof. K. Leisenring will speak
on "A Configurational Theorem in In-
vers Geometry."
Logic Seminar - Thurs., 4:30 p.m.,
Room 439 MH. 1. Discussion of program
and time of meeting. 2. Cylindrical al-
(Continued on Page 4)'

Herb Estes, Inc.
)45B
1954 CHEVROLET, USED, very low mile-
age. Call George, NO 2-7293, )43B
HIDE-A-BED, bookcase, chest of draw-
ers, vacuum, kitchenware, etc. 327 E.
Williams, Apt. 5. Come 6-9 evenings
only. )40B
THOR WASHER, semi-automatic, good
condition, $55. Call after 5:30 p.m.
NO 2-5703. )44B
CORNET-MARTIN B FLAT, Commit-
tee model, excellent condition. Phone
G. Kiddon. Ypsi. 5880, Ext. 408. )39B
NEVER USED 215 Webcor tape record-
er. $155, NO 3-2569. )38B
MUST SELL-Two Hollywood beds, Sim-
mons box spring and mattresses, two
years old, good condition. 1013 Arbon-
dale, Atp. 2, NO 2-4661. )37B

ARE YOU A BMOD? Wanted 200 men.
League Dance Sessions. Mass meeting
Wed., Sept. 29, 4 P.M. League Ball-
room. )3F
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING. Finished work and hand
ironing. Specialize in winter cot-
tons and blouses. Also ironing sep-
arately. Free pick-up and delivery.
Phone NO 2-9020. )6I

A

Quick
Resu/ts

Daily
Classifieds

I am interested in Life for 8c-
--Gina

)7F

ment
men.

5,000 are girls and 9,000 are

i

I

STRINGED
INSTRUMENTS
Repair-
Reconditioni;ng
Accessories
#a~ CC© s
STRING SHOP
211 South State
Phone NO 3-3874

i
ii
fb
s
c
L
P
t
d
f
a
rn
a
t:
n
0
a
s;
A
B
ti
w

1947 DODGE SEDAN, radio, heater,
sharp condition. Only $275. Fitzger-
ald-Jordan. 607 Detroit. Phone NO
8-8141. )41B
3-SPEED RECORD PLAYER and radio
combination. After 8 p.m. call NO
3-1531, ext. 436, room 214. )36B
LANGUAGE COURSES, half price. Lin-
gua-phone, German; Holt LP, Ger-
man: Holt LP French. $25 each. NO
3-3945. )35B
1951 KAISER four door. Blue, radio,
heater, hydromatic, new tires, the big
lot across from downtown carport.
Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )31B
GOOD WOOD CLARINET, $100 range,
contact Drury, NO' 3-0771. )21B
1951 CHEVROLET BELLE-AIRE. Black,
one owner, radio, heater, power
glide, low mileage. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron Mot-
or Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )33B
NAVY BLUE TRENCH COAT. Size 40.
NO 8-9595. )30B
1947 DODGE CLUB COUPE, radio,
heater, new rubber C1res. The big lot
across from down tovn carport. Huron
Motor Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )34B
1951 CHEVROLET two door, radio and
heater. Beige color, one owner, real
clean. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )32B

Bring

with
BEN ALEXANDER
as Officer Frank
Smith

Tweety
Pie
Cartoon

COMING-
Charles Laughton
in
"Hobson's Choice"

-M77 1
-m.m.m...-

Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

TAXI
RADIO DISPATCHED
VETERAN'S CAB
NO 2-4477

1954-55 LECTURE COURSE
Second Number -Oct. 22
"CA giant of a drama" ...--San Francisco Chronicle.
"A distinguished, exciting play. Don't fail to see it."
-S F. News
OTHER CELEBRITIES ON THE COURSE
* GEN. MARK CLARK-Oct. 12
"The Struggle in Asia"
* JOHN DOS PASSOS - Nov. 18
"Jefferson's Times
* DR. HARRY SCHWARTZ -Dee. 7
"The Men Who Rule Communism"
® JUSTICE WILLIAM DOUGLAS -Feb.24
"The United States in World Affairs"
CLAUDE RAINS'- Mareh16
"Great Words To Great Music"

i

THREE THOUSAND MEMBERSHIPS NEEDED...
To Assure Ann Arbor of a Successful Resident Professional Theatre

"The Dramatic Arts Center is a non-profit organization of civic minded citizens which
seeks to encourage Ann Arbor and the surrounding community in interest and parti-
cipaiton in the arts. A major portion of the program is the attempt to establish a
resident professional theatre. Ann Arbor is fortunate in the scope and variety of
cultural advantages which it provides. But the requirements of the community as
well as the large student population are not being fully met. Your support is needel
NOW to assure success."
-1954-55 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

24 Hours Service

We Go Anywhere

YOUR BEST BET-CALL A VET

DRAMATIC ARTS
CENTER
ARENA THEATRE - MASONIC TEMPLE
1954-55 PLAYBILL
"ARMS AND THE MAN"
by George Bernard Show
October 21 to November 14
"THE LONDON MERCHANT" or
"GEORGE BARNWELL"
by George Lillo
November 18 to December 12
"THE MOON IN THE
YELLOW RIVER"
by Denis Johnson
December 31 to January 20
"CALIGULA"

11

r

Clan Crawford
Eugene Power

Otis Hardy
Damon Wood

Warner Rice
Richard Boys

d'Iit

T . 1 1

r----

-I11

STOCK MARKET CLASSES

Mrs. Jessie Coller Mrs. Burnette Staebler Richard Wilt
------------------------------
THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER INCORPORATED
Box 179, Ann Arbor, Michigan '
Masonic Temple, 327 S. 4th Ave.

11

II

iIII

i1

i

11

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan