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February 25, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY "5, 1954

THE MICRIGAN DAILY

PACIF THRrr.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
MiCHIGAN'S HOPES:

L .IL L; 1 1 xr G

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i

-Daily-Don Campbell
MICHIGAN'S "BRAIN-TRUST"
.. . Phil Diamond, Don Canham, Elmer Swanson

Canham's Strategy May
Decide Conference Title

Newman.,
Fletcher Win
Playoff Tilts
Two Clubs Meet
For Cage Title
In two first place playoff games
in the Independent basketball, eg e e m n d w e oet
league,, Newman downed Forest-
ers, 74-26, and Fletcher Hall came
from behind to defeat the Ramb-
lin Wrecks, 39-26 at the Intra-
mural Sports Building last night.
Stan Bohing led the Newmanj
onslaught with 18 points. High
scorer for the Fletcher quintet was
Bob Ames with 11, while Ramblin
Wrecks were led by Bud Turner
who dropped in 9 counters.
THE RESIDENCE halls water
polo championship went to Gom-'
berg House as they beat Cooley 1-0
on Duncan McGoon's tally with
but one minute remaining in the
-game.
In fraternity "B" basketball
Sigma Chi beat SAM, 39-18, with
Jack DeVries leading the way as
he countered with 11 points.
In another high scoring affair
SAE overwhelmed Kappa Sigma,
46-10. Psi Upsilon downed ZBT,
39-25, as Tom Gilmore scored 19
points, and Tau Delta Phi defeated
Theta Delta Chi, 25-16.
Other scores were:
Alpha Delta Phi 30, Theta Chi
21 .
Chi Psi 30, ATO 16
Delta Tau Delta 23, Beta Theta
Pi 16
Lambda Chi Alpha 25, Phi Kap-!
pa Psi 22
Phi Delta Theta 23, Phi Gamma
Delta 18
Phi Kappa Sigma defeated Sig-
ma Nu (forfeit)
Pi Lambda Phi 26, Sigma Phi
Epsilon 19
Theta Xi 21, Delta Upsilon 17

Student-Faculty CHGsA' HodE:
Sophs Hold Kett

Scholars, Teachers To Wage Battles
In Twelve Events at Sports Builditg
By DAVE LIVINGSTON
Michigan's students get a chance to meet their profs on even
terms tonight when the Intrainural department puts on its annual
Faculty vs. Students sports program.
From handball courts to pool tables the students will challenge
their tutors in twelve different sports and in over 50 separate events.
* *~ 'A*
THE BIGGEST part of the program will be held at the SportsI
Building with various other events scheduled for more appropriate
places.
The rifle range, for instance, will be the scene of a battle
between the sharpshooting officers from the ROTC units and the
best in undergraduate talent.
The top billiard sharks from the faculty will take on the students
in both straight rail and three cushion contests at the Union, while{
in the basement of the same building two teams of students will duelI
a couple of faculty aggregations on the bowling alleys.j
The bowling matches are scheduled for 4:00 this afternoon.
* * * *4

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
BOB KNOX, JOHN O'REILLY, AND JIM KRUTHERS
... three of Michigan's swimming hopes for the future

By LEW HAMBURGER
It is often said in collegiate
swimming circles that the key to
a team's future is the strength of
the squad's sophomores.
If such is the case, Michigan's
future is a propitious one. Matt
Mann's successor will be able to

t

<+r

By AL EISENBERG
The winner of the Big Ten track
meet to be held at Champaign in
less than two weeks may be de-
cided in a small room on the sec-
ond floor of Michigan's Athletic
Administration Building.
The center of attention in the
} room is a mammoth blackboard
which: covers all of one wall. On
the slate each event that will be
run in the Western Conference
meet is listed and under each event
are names-names o probable en-
tries from the Big Ten schools.
, * *
HEAD COACH Don Canham has
spent many hours up in that dingy,
and often times dirty room, trying
to figure out who Illinois and the
other schools will run in each
event and the probable winners for
each race.
What Canham and his asso-
ciates, assistant coach Elmer
Swanson and track expert Phil
Diamond are trying to do is to
place the Maize and Blue cinder-
man in the races where the com-
petition is not particularly po-
tent. By placing his men care-
fully, Canham hopes to garner
enough points so as to bring the
Western Conference Champion-,
ship back to Ann Arbor.
Take, as case in point, Joe
Smith, a mythical Michigan track-
ster. Smith can either run in the
300 yard or 440 yard event. In the
-quarter-mile, however, Illinois has
the brilliant Ralph Fesenden. Can-
ham, then, would probably place
Hairstyling
to pease!!
Try our:
Personnel - Workmanship
Service -10 Hairstylists
NO WAITING
The Duseola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

y to Swimming Future

Smith in the 300 yard event be-
cause it ishalmost impossible for
Smith to pick up the five points a
first in the quarter-mile would get
him. In the 300-yard race, on the
other hand, Smith might be able
to pick up a first place.
* * *
CANHAM'S self-imposed job is,
of course, extremely difficult and
arduous. In discussing his task,
Canham said, "It is more difficult
to figure where to place our men
this year than it has been ever be-
fore. There seems to be more ex-
cellent athletes in the conference
than in any previous season."
The coach continued, "As it
looks now, it will be a battle
down to the wire between Illinois
and Michigan. It is so close that
a break will probably decide who
cops the title. Of course, the I-
lini have an advantage in the
fact that they will be competing
at home and they will have a big
crowd rooting for them."
To show how Lady Luck can de-
cide who will win the meet, Can-
ham pointed to the fact that when
a Michigan trackman tripped over
a hurdle a few years ago it cost
Michigan the Conference crown.
Canhampointed out that bad
placing of men has hurt Michi-
gan's chances in the past. "All we
can do is hope," the coach said.
"Just because we've made mistakes
in the past, or because Michigan
has come in second so many times,
is no reason for us to become dis-
couraged," he concluded.
SPORTS
* * *

HEADLINING tonight's program at the I-M Building are 14 call on the Wardrop twins, Char-
volleyball games where the interested spectator will stand a good ley Bates, Mike Delaney, Bobby
chance of finding his staid economics, or possibly psychology prof Knox. Jim Kruthers, and John
prancing in a pair of gym shorts batting a volleyball around. swimming records.i
The single basketball game scheduled on the program prom- swmnrcd
ises to be one of the most interesting events of the evening.
Such prominent figures on the local sports scene as basketball THESE MEN are not reserved
coach Bill Perigo, his assistants Matt Patanelli and Dave Strack, and for future use alone, however. Al-
foitball coaches Bill Orwig and Don Robinson will lead the faculty though their names may not ap-
against an all-star cast that includes such athletes as former cage pear in headlines they are the men
who can make or break the team's
captain Doug Lawrence and gridders Gene Knutson, Bob Topp, and chances in the Conference meet,
Dick Beison. two weeks hence and the crucial
* * * * dual meet with Ohio State's Buck-
IN EVERY other sport on tap for tonight--handball, squash, eyes in two days. Their more pub-
badminton, water polo, paddleball, tennis, and even fencing-the top licized teammates will undoubted-
talent on campus will be featured. I ly capture the limelight, but the
The first events will get underway at 7:00 p.m. with the pro- second and third places that these
gram scheduled to continue until about 10:00 p.m. men are counted on to garner can
The man who is responsible for the planning of this far-reach- spell the difference between vic-
in strdent fault n Rnri h Ear Riske will also rohal the tory anddefeat.

careers in the public's eye since
their elevation to the sophomore
level and eligibility February 6.
Charley Bates is Mann's sec-
ond diver hoping to fill the ca-
pable shoes of Jimmy Walters,
who graduates in 1955. Bates has
taken second place to Walters in
all of the meets in which he par-
ticipated this year. He came to
Michigan from Ypsilanti Central
High Schol where he was two years
a state champion and All-Ameri-
can.
* * *
MIKE DELANEY is the team's
leading prospect in the breast-
stroke events lHe comes from De-
troit's Southeastern High School,
and is one of the most improved
members of the team.
Bobby Knox is a freestyle
sprinter who, although some-
what small of physical stature to
fill Don Hill's large shoes, is
counted on to duplicate the big
boy's swimming feats. He, like
Bates, was a member of the All-
American high school team. His
records at Saginaw's Arthur Hill
High School include three na-
tional records. He was a member

* of his team's 400and 160 yard
freestyle relays which set na-
tional schoolboy records.
He also held the national 100
yard freestyle record which was
held by a present teammate Ron
Gora before him, and before that
by Captain Don Hill.
JIM KRUTHERS, F o r d s o n-
Dearborn star, is a present Wol-
verine backstroker, hoping to step
in when John Chase graduates in
June. In his senior year of high
school he was the mythical Na-
tional champion, having turned in
the nation's best time for the 100
yard backstroke. He broke the
state record for that event the
same year and was another mem-
ber of the All-American team.
John O'Reilly is last, but not
least of the second year men on
the team. John's accomplishments
at Mount Carmel High School in
Park Ridge, Ill, were negligible due
mainly to an appendectomy in his
senior year. In spite of that fact
he was so highly thought of that
his teammates elected him cap-
tain.
Since coming to Michigan he
has worked steadily until now he
has been acclaimed, along with
Delaney, one of the most improv-
ed members of the squad.
NHL HOCKEY
Boston 5, New York 3
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Albion 73, Kalamazoo 62
Calvin College 68, Ferris 66
Holy Cross 76, Dartmouth 60
Brown 75, Harvard 61
NBA BASKETBALL
Rochester 79, Baltimore 64
PURCHASE
" fron
"P'URCHASE"

1g ybuuull LA gjJ *A~5AA V, yl r ll nlbm , py' CWll flA J ' Sfl y t al
busiest man on the scene tonight-but not as an administrator.
The energetic Riskey is scheduled to compete himself in no less
than five different sports: volleyball, handball, squash, badminton,
and paddleball.

The Wardrop twins, Olympic
representatives from Great Brit-
ain, have had their names and

GEORGE CHIN DOUG MULLEN
.. . right-wing ,... center

PAT COONEY
. . . left-wing

Chin, Mullen, Cooney Revitalize Hockey Squad

KEN COPP
Night Editor

I

,.

,,,,I.

6,h

THE LOGIC MAJOR.
WHO HATED
ROLLS

By DAVE BAAD
In a critical moment in last
year's hockey season, Michigan
coach Vic Heyliger evolved a line-
up change which sparked the Wol-
verines to their third straight
NCAA hockey title.
Following a humiliating 5-2 loss
to league leading Minnesota,
which threatened to put the Maize
and Blue out of the Midwest Hock-
ey League race, Heyliger moved
Doug Mullen into the center slot
on the second line in between Pat
Cooney and George Chin.
THE MANEUVER worked al-
most immediate wonders and al-
though Michigan lost again to
Minnesota the next night, it
bounced back to win the final five
regular season league games and

two playoff contests to take its
third straight National crown.
The contribution of Mullen,
Chin and Cooney to this resurg-
ence can be measured in cold,
hard point totals. Working to-
gether for the first time in their
careers, the trio accounted for
20 of the Wolverines' 41 goals
and finished one, three, four in
the Michigan scoring race.
Chin had 42 points. Mullen 35
and Cooney 29. However despite
its success last season, it has been
the line's superb play in 1953-54
that has merited Heyliger's praise
as one of the real great lined in
Michigan hockey history.
* * '.
DUE to ineligibilities and crip-
pling injuries, the NCAA cham-
pions have been forced to play all
season with only ten men.

Mullen, enjoying his greatest
season in college hockey, has
played as many as 45 minutes
in some games and tops all Wol-
verine scorers with 48 points.
Chin, with 18 goals and 22 as-
sists has 40 points and Cooney's
12 goals and 23 assists give him
35 points for the year.
The 47 goals the line has de-
posited in opposition nets is six
more than all the rest of the team
has scored together.
ALL THREE are fast skaters
and as Colorado College coach
Cheddy Thompson said last week
following his team's double loss
to Michigan, "They know what to
do with the puck when. they get it
in front of the net."
However, it isn't only offense
that makes this line top-notch in
collegiate hockey. It is an excel-
lent fore-checking and . back-
checking line as is evidenced by
their being utilized continuously
against the opposition's No. 1 lines.
In this weekend's big two game
series with Minnesota, the last
on Coliseum ice for the senior trio,
Chin, Cooney and Mullen will be
used against John Mayesich, Dick
Dougherty, and Gene Campbell,
considered by Minnesota fans as
the best college combination in
the game today.

The right side-if you pick the right busi-
ness. Michigan Bell Telephone Company
will help you, through its men's manage-
ment training program.
You start right oftwith good pay, pre-
paring for a job at management level.

Representatives of Michigan Bell will tell
you all about it when they come here for
personal interviews
MARCH 18
Business Administration, Placement Office

Which side of the desk will
you be on ten years from now?

Recently a young mid-westerner enrolled at a
university as a Logic major. His father had told him,
with some understatement, that he was illogical. He refused
to squire a pretty girl to a dance because her name was
June Betz and he was against gambling.
He wouldn't eat avocados because they were also called
"alligator pears" and he didn't like alligators.
In addition, he was a'slob.
Some of the men in his dorm tried to talk to him.
"Look at that shirt," they said. "The material's cheesy.
Why don't you hop down and get a Van Heusen
Oxfordian ... it's soft, fine oxford cloth."
"I'm not attending Oxford. I'm attending Old Siwash,"
answered our boy.
"But, look, Buster. This oxford cloth is woven tighter
so it'll last longer. It's a smart investment.
And it only costs 4.50."
"So who needs it? I might get hit by a truck. Then what
good would it be?" quoth Buster.
"What about your collar? Flat as a pancake! Don't you
want a good-looking button-down with that famous
Van Heusen relaxed-roll?" one asked.
"I got nothing against pancakes. I hate rolls."
Note: Our man flunked Logic post haste, and was drafted.
The Army has him classified under "Secret Weapons."

IX

I

4.

1
\ t
.\
for all that's fine in
SLACKS
If you want slacks that are
more than just a pair of
pants, be sure the label
says SEVEN SEAS. With
over 50 years of experience,
they know how to achieve
the perfect combination of.
fabric excellence,

Meanwhile, here are answers to a few of your questions:
WHAT IS MANAGEMENT TRAINING? A training pro- accounting, education, liberal arts, statistics,
gram with pay, and regular increases, leading physics or other subjects.
to a solid future as a member of management. WHERE WILL I WORK? Probably with Michigan
IS ANY SPECIALIZED BACKGROUND REQUIRED? No. Bell, although a few may work with other
Not if you're a college graduate. There's a Bell Telephone Companies, such as Illinois,
position for you whether you studied science, Indiana, Ohio, and Wisconsin.
Opportunities are unlimited in the fast-growing Bell System
MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY

A Michigan Favorite For 64 Years'

C T n r L_ r' !t M [ A s t X/. - .-. .

f >' saigs

t .'°". =

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