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February 23, 1954 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-23

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1954

.........

;

ORIGINAL CHOREOGRAPHY:
AMunt-Brooks Dance Grouj
By DON HARRIS
An unusual but stimulating in- Mr. Brooks is as versatile in the
ovation in dance recitals will be field of music as dance. Holding
eatured when Maxine Hunt and a Master's degree in musical com-
lfred Brooks bring their dance position from the Juilliard School
ompany into Pattengill Auditor- of Music, he has studied with
im for their first Ann Arbor ap- such important musical figures as
earance, at 8 p.m. Saturday. Nadia Boulanger. The "Web" for
In addition to the regular pro- Which he choreographed the dance
rom of dance compositions, the and composed the music will be
roup will begin the recital with performed here.
lecture-demonstration explain- Considered by the dance critic
Ig how they choreograph a and authority, Louis Horst, as
ance. one of our forward-looking and
* * * versatile companies," the group
BOTH DANCERS have had was formed in1948 when both
onsiderable training in choreo- were co-directors of the Dance
raphy, having received the ma- Workshop at Adelphi College.
3r part of their dance training * * * .
rith Hanya Holm. Miss Munt has SINCE 1948 they have organ-
Aso studied at Bennington Col- ized the Munt-Brooks School of
ege, Colorado College, the Univer- Dance in New York and have given
ity of Wisconsin, and with Mary many recitals and concerts
Vigman in Switzerland. throughout the country.
Through Miss Munt's efforts Last summer the group was
while head of the dance depart- in residence at the National
ment at Adelphi College, a Ba- Music Camp, at Interlochen, Mi-
chelor of Arts degree with a ma- chigan. While at the Camp, they
jor in dance was instituted, commissioned a work from Fre-
derick Coulter, '56SM, a student
composer in the School of Mu-
sic. Entitled "There is a Sea-
son," this work will also be per-
formed Saturday.
Tickets for the recital are one
TOA Y / dollar, and can be purchased be-
ginning February 15 at the Main
Office, Barbour Gym, or at the
door on the night of the perform-
ance. The program is co-spon-
sored by the National Music Camp
and the Department of Physical
"" - * Education for Women.

p To Perform

City Health
Inspection
Disclosed
(Continued from Page 1)
tails food being procured from
"approved sources" and that it be
"clean, wholesome, free of spoilage,
and so prepared as to be same for
human consumption." The viola-
tions in this area were mostly
minor ones.
* * *
VIOLATIONS also occurred in
the proper disposal of waste in.45
per cent of the establishments ex-
amined and a total of 51 per cent
either had defects in their toilet
facilities for employes or none at
all.
Handwashing facilities were
not up to par in 63 per cent of
those establishments investigat-
ed.
Under a regulation stating that
"all food shall be prepared, stored,
and served so as to be protected
from dust, flies, vermin, depreda-
tion and pollution by rodents, un-
necessary handling, droplet inspec-
tion, overhead leakage, and all
other forms of contamination," the
survey judged 40 per cent of the
restaurants violated this ordinance
in storing their food.
Minor violationsroccurred in the
cleaning and construction of floors
in 64 per cent of the restaurants
and there was present ventila-
tion deficencies of 31 per cent of
the restaurants tallied.
Although the percentages have
a tendency to run high in most of
these areas health department
spokesman point out that these
figures may have been changed
durin gthe past four months.

'U' Research
On Catalase
Receives Aid
Study Supported
By Cancer Group
University research into a na-
tural enzyme of the body known
as catalase, which may function
to delay cancer growth, will be
supported by the American Can-
cer Society, Society officials an-
nounced yesterday.
Dr. Albert H. Wheeler of the
Medical School is currently in-
vestigating the relationship be-
tween cancer and the reduction of
catalase in the liver. He and oth-
er scientists have found that tu-
mors produce some substance
which neutralizes or destroys ca-
talese.
* * *
DR. WHEELER has isolated the
tumor substance which destroys
the enzyme and has injected it
into cancerous animals. Injections
slowed down tumor growth slight-
ly, but the product was so im-
pure that scientists are still un-
certain what effect a potent "ca-
talese inhibitor" would have on
cancerous animals.
From results observed so far,
however, Dr. Wheeler is consid-
ering the possibility that the
production of catalase inhibitor
is a part of the body's defense
against cancer.
The only known action of cata-
lase is on hydrogen peroxide,
which can affect poisonous con-
centrations in the body, breaking
them into salt and water.

ALFRED BROOKS

Today thru 6:30 & 8:50
Sunday O 60C
"Shakespeare at his greatest." -TIME Magazine

Survey Discloses Decreasing
Number of Science Teachers

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Gold International watch with
black suede band. Reward. Call Jean
Cooper, NO 3-5974. )100A
FOR SALE
1949 FORD (CUSTOM), 2-door; good
tires, good running order. Body needs
some attention-cheap for cash. Cal
at 416 S. 5th Ave., Apt. No. 2 any
time after 6 p.m. or ali day Sunday.
)324B
1947 CHEVROLET-4-door, radio and
heater. Needs motor work. Make us
an offer. 222 W. Washington, Phone
2-4588. )317B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
1941 CHEVROLET-4-door, radio and
heater. Runs very well, 222 W. Wash-
ington, Phone 2-4588. )318B
1937 CHRYSLER-2-door, well cared for.
Greased regularly, good motor, bat-
tery, and tires; reliable transportation,
only $75. Phone NO 2-9020. )286B
APPLIANCES, cameras, radios, toys,
typewriters, watches, etc. Large coded
wholesale catalogue 25c. David B.
Vogt, 2214 Iroquois, Flint. )304B
A MEDIUM blue-grey gabardine suit.
Single breasted, sport style. Like new,
size 40 regular. Very reasonably pric-
ed. Call NO 3-1904 after 8 p.m. on
weekdays only. Ask for Steve. )299B
1941 FORD CLUB COUPE-New motor,
radio and heater. Make us an offer.
222 W. Washington, Phone 2-4588.
)320B
A REAL BUY !-1950 Chevrolet, radio,
heater, new tires. NO 2-7761. After
5 p.m. or weekend. )312B
CANARIES-Singers and females. Para-
keets or Budgies. $5 and up. Price de-
pends on sex and color. Bird cages
and supplies. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. 7th.
)311B
1946 MERCURY CLUB COUPE-Radio
and heater. Loaded with extras. 222
W. Washington, Phone 2-4588. )321B
FOR SALE-Apt. size monitor automatic
washing machine, 1 yr. old. NO 3-8809.
)314B
1940 FORD-2-door, heater, and new
tires. Sharp car. 222 W. Washington,
Phone 2-4588. )319B
TAN REGISTERED MALE BOXER-Call
Ken Pierce, NO 2-3143. )323B
BATTERIES $5 EXCHANGE
Guaranteed - Free Installation
BATTERY STORES ASSOCIATION
Liberty and Ashley )329B
RECLINING, UPHOLSTERED, tapestry
chair with wooden arms and footstool
-fair condition, $10. Two large side-
boards, $8 each. Coal hot water heat-
er with two stovepipes, $7.50. Muntz
table model 14" TV set with antennae
hardly used, $65. Majestic portable
radio with inside and outside aerial,
$50. Pocket size radio without batter-
ies, $15. Six compartment rabbit
hutch, well built, $15. Phone NO
2-9020. )328B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Argus C-3 with case and flash like
new $48. Purchase Camera Shop, 1116
So. University. NO 8-6972. )327B
PLYMOUTH COUPE - 1940. Excellent
rubber and motor. Radio and heater.
$125. Phone 8-9826 after 6. )326B
'39 NASH-Overdrive, extras. Name a
real low price. Call NO 3-1846. )325B

ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Rooms by Day or Week
Campus Tourist Homes. Ph. NO 3-8454
518 E. Williams St. (near State)
)25D;
ROOMS for Male Students near Union,
Cooking privileges. Call NO 3-8454.
)40D
SINGLE AND DOUBLE ROOM -- Girls,
close to campus. 427 Hamilton P1.
Phone 2-3086. )47D

RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1214 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
3i blocks east of East Eng.
314 State St., Phone NO 8-7177

IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE-Excellent
living quarters for male student in
house five minutes from campus.
Hot plates allowed, ice box furnished.
Call NO 3-0849. )48D
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED 4 room flat for rent,
adults only. Heat and water furn-
ished, 8985 Island Lake Rd. I mile
west of Dexter. HA 6-9411. )23C
SIAMESE CAT-Stud service, call NO
2-9060. )33C
FOR RENT-Nice room, equipped for
light housekeeping with hot and cold
running water, electric plate, all utili-
ties. Must have a car. Phone NO
2-9020. ) 34C
NEAR CAMPUS!-Single room for stu-
dent. 945 Greenwood, Ph. NO 8-6450.
)31C
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments. Ph.
NO 2-2678. 510 Catherine FStreet near
State. Alta Graves.
PERSONAL
TALL, UPPER-CLASS CO-ED, wanted as
partner for League Advanced Dance
Class every Thurs., 7:15 p.m. for eight
weeks. Write Box 6. )64F
ARE YOU up on your studies but down
on life? Then try Life-c a copy.
Phone Student Periodical, NO 5-1843.
HELP WANTED
WANTED - Couple to care for elderly
man, will have very comfortable home
6 blocks from campus. Call 3-5606
days, 3-4047 evenings. )66H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TEACHER OF SINGING and speaking.
Dr. Kenneth N. Westerman, 715 Gran-
ger, NO 8-6584. )291
TYPING SERVICES. Experienced in
manuscripts, theses, and term papers.
Call NO 2-7605, Mrs. Conner. )281
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales, and service.
MORRILLS

WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Buff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Ph, NO 2-9020. )21
PIANO SERVICE -- Tuning, repairing.
Work guaranteed. Call University Mu-
sic House, NO 8-7515. )27I

FERRY FIELD BARBER SHOP-806 So.
State. Men, Women and Children.
For appointments, phone NO 8-9507.
"Expert Service and Courtesy" our
motto. j291
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Phone NO 8-7590. 830
So. Main. )3I
GRAD STUDENT available for baby-sit-
ting. Call 3-0471. )301
TYPING expertly done and guaranteed.
3YP-5877, )321
TYPING SERVICE-Experienced. Call
NO 8-8844. )311

I

BUSINESS SERVICES

.

51

Sm

I

The motion picture of aI ime...
for lH timel...WINNER OF
5 ACADEMY AWARDS!

'A Work
of Genius"
--LIFE Magaine

r*
LOOKING
FOR
SOMETHING?
This classified ad was
answered after only one day.
LOST-Keys in dark red keytain-
er Saturday morning between
Newberry Hall parking lot and
Angell Hall. Call 3-2101. )10L

<,

M
t

by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
SalEAN SIMMONS-FELIX AYLMER-NORMAN WOOLAND
A J. Arthur Rank Organization Presentation

qw

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'

Only

5

Shopping

Days

Left

7The IJ ic Cehte"

LP SALE

COLUMBIA-VICTOR- MERCURY
SALE ENDS FEBRUARY 28th

By FREDDI LOEWENBERG
While school enrollments soar,
the number of high school science
teachers is decreasing, according
to a survey taken by Scientific
American Magazine.
Locally, Ann Arbor and Univer-
sity High Schools have not felt
the pinch, but education school
officials noted that there was a
decrease in the number of stu-
dents majoring in science.
SOME 7,000 science teachers are
Public Relations
Experts To Speak
Three public relations experts,
from the fields of industry, fi-
nance and utilities will take part
in the Public Relations Forum
scheduled for 3 p.m. tomorrow in
the Architecture Auditorium.
Participants and their topics in-
clude Fred Black, "History and
Growth of Public Relations in Am-
erica;" W. Calvin Patterson,
"Public Relations in Action" and
Noble D. Travis, "Public Relations
on the Community Level."
Hayes To Discuss
Isotope Problems
"Problems and Discoveries in the
Metabolism of Lakes As Disclosed
by the Use of Radioactive Iso-
topes" is the subject of a lecture
to be given by Prof. F. Ronald
Hayes of Dalhousie University,
Halifax, Nova Scotia, at 8 p.m.
tomorrow in the Natural Science
Auditorium.
Sponsored by the Department of
Fisheries, the lecture is open to the
public.
Enrollment Soars
Foreign student enrollment at
the University for the spring se-
mester has increased ten and one-
half percent over last year.
Statistics released yesterday
show 925 students from 67 poli-
tical areas attending classes here,
as compared with 837 from 70
areas last spring.

already needed to fill replacements
each year. Based on birth rate
statistics, this demand is expected
to rise soon to 10,000 a year. Al-
together, 33,000 more teachers will
be required in 1966.
In the face of this increase,
sources of teachers are drying
up. Recent studies in Minnesota
showed that only 41 per cent
of potential teachers are actual-
ly employed as teachers in the
year after their graduation, with
science having the lowest per-
centage.
The University education school
reflects the national trend accord-
ing to Dean Willard C. Olson.
However, he pointed out, the de-
crease is part of an overall short-
age of teachers, and the educa-
tion school is concentrating on the
problem as a whole.
. *
NO SHORTAGE in teachers of
biology was reported by the Bureau
of Appointments, which handles
placement for Education School
graduates. However, in the physi-
cal sciences, Bureau officials could
place "2 or 3 times as many stu-
dents as are available."
Just as serious as the shortage
of quantity is the shortage of qual-
ity, nationally, the magazine
points out. Requirements in many
states are far from exacting, with
a large number of those teaching
science not certified to do so.
Many schools requiredscience
teachers to instruct in other sub-
jects as well.
Weriette To Talk
Prof. J. Philip Wernette of the
business administration school will
speak on "What Future Economic
Progress Means to You" at the
first speech department assembly
of the semester at 5 p.m. tomor-
row in Rackham Lecture Hall.

For Your

MUNT - BROOKS
MODERN DANCE CONCERT

4'

300 South Thayer

PATTI NGI L
AUDITORIUM

CHORAL UNION CONCERT

ROOM AND BOARD

MISS THAT HOME COOKING? Try the
next best thing for only $1.80/day.
Price includes lunch and supper. Call
or see House Mgr., NO 2-8312; 1319
Cambridge. )18E
ROOMS FOR RENT
ONE LARGE SINGLE room near campus
-maid service, refrigerator privileges.
Call NO 2-7108. )41D

Ann Arbor High School
Admission
$1.00

,r;

HAL WALL1S
CEASE
FIRE'
Never A Motion Picture Story Like
This...You'll Live It With Them!

SUNDAY, FEB. 28, 8:30
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets $1.50, $2.50, $3.00
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burton Memorial Tower
I BOSTON "POPS" MARCH 4

=

-
.soar.rre

"9

l HELD OVER!

The Department of Speech Announces
BOX OFFICE OPENS WEDNESDAY, 10 A.M.
1954 SPRING PLAYBILL
Richard Strauss' Comic Opera
March 2,3,4,5,6 ARIADNE OF NAXOS
With the School of Music
Josef Blatt's English Translation
Shakespeare's Comedy
March "25, 20, 2'4
THE TAMING OF THE SHREW
ID Eugene Hochman's 1953 Hopwood Winner
Apri 22,23,24 VERANDA ON THE HIGHWAY
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS OPENING NIGHTS - $1.50

""."

Matinees Sc, Eves.
Shows at 1,3, 5, 7,9I

80c
P.M.

I

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...... wb

NOW. .They're In The Movies!
...and in COLOR!
BAL
and
DESI .
A RNAZ
to M-G-M's hilarous comedy

Only One Dance Like The-...
PAUL BUNYAN DANCE

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