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February 09, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-09

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UME t 104

THE MICHIGAN DAI-LY

PAGE FIVE

I I,

M

I

FILE BANKRUPTCY PETITION:
Debts Force Arts Theater To Close

15-

IHC Plans
Orientation
Programs

.1

I'

ENTERTAI ING?

By RONA FRIEDMAN
Limited seating capacity, de-
clining attendence and high oper-
ating costs were the reasons given
for the closing of Arts Theater
Sun., Jan. 17.
"We were operating at a loss
and were getting further and fur-
ther into debt" commented Prof.
MarviJn Felheim of the English De-
partment who was on the theater's
Board of Directors.
* . .
"NOBODY bothered to make an
adequate check of finances," he
continued "and even if we had
sold out every night we couldn't
have kept going because of the
BLENDED
HAIR STYLING
for LADIES
by EXPERTS
i*. 9* t &ipb
715 N. University

huge operating costs. Salaries for
the actors alone was $650 a week.
"At the end our assets were
$2000 while our liabilities were
$6700." A bankruptcy petition
was filed in Detroit the day aft-
er we closed."
"Though there are no tangible
plans for reopening in the fall,"
Prof. Felheim said, "the three
years Arts Theater functioned has
proved that if such a group was
profitably and carefully run it
could succeed."
Bill Wiegand of the English de-
partment who was promotions
manager of Arts Theater also
commented that the theater
should have been more prudent in
managing their funds.
"A TOWN of this size," he said,
"will not support this large a pro-
fessional company. In order for a
theater like this to succeed the sec-
ondary actors can not be profes-
sionals. They could possibly be vol-
unteers from the University.
"Arts Theater never caught
on with the townspeople very
well," Wiegand continued, "But

SEE US FOR

even though some of the plays
they put on are admittedly hard
to sell the production of more
familiar plays would have made
Arts Theater like the rest of the
theater groups in Ann Arbor. If
they are able to reopen I hope
they will continue producing
this kind of theater.

e/eionta1{zeI

"Creditors and membership
holders expressed more sorrow
than indignation when they learn-
ed that Arts Theater was unable
to continue," Wiegand said. "And
it was awfully good while it last-
ed," he concluded.
Sixth Concert.
Offers Group
From Canada
The Toronto Symphony Orches-
tra, under the direction of Sir Er-
nest MacMillan, will present the
sixth concert in the Choral Union
Series at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Hill Auditorium.
Betty-Jean Hagen, 22 year old
Canadian winner of several covet-
ed international violin awards, will
appear with the orchestra in Lalo's
"Symphonie Espagnole, Op. 21."

MATCHES
NAPKINS

PLAYING CARDS

The Inter-house Council is
sponsoring a housing orientation
program for men students from 3
to 4:30 p.m. tomorrow which will
be the first to provide information
about fraternity, co-operative as
well as university housing.
Representatives from the Inter-
co-operative Council and the In-
ter-fraternity Council will attend
informal meetings in the main
lounges of the three men's resi-
dence halls. This type of contact
will allow the men to consider all
types of housing arrangements be-
fore future contracts are drawn up.
IHC IS sending letters to each
quad resident, explaining the pro-
gram and including statements by
ICC and IFC. Details on financial
and social obligations will go to
each student and further informa-
tion may be obtained at the meet-
ings.
Rodger Kidston, president of
IHC, urges all men in the resi-
dencehalls to attend these
housing programs. "We want the
men to see the pros and cons of
each system, he said, so that
they can live where they want to
live."
The housing infor'mation pro-
gram is on a two-year trail basis
and will only be held the second
semester. Women are not includ-
ed in the Wednesday meetings but
a similar program may be arrang-
ed for them later in the semester.

Gifts Accepted
By Regents
(Continued from Page 1)
The DuPont Corporation has
renewed its offer of a postgrad-
uate fellowship in chemical engi-
neering and a postgraduate teach-
ing fellowship in chemistry. Du-
Pont also contributed a $10,000
grant-in-aid to make fundamental
research in chemistry as effective
as possible.
The Dow Chemical Company
renewed for 1954-55 three $2,500
fellowships in chemical engineer-
ing, physics ana organic chem-
istry.
Two appropriations totalling
$24,650 were also approved by the
regents.
Twenty thousand dollars has
been appropriated for adding
seating on the stage of Hill Audi-
torium for such events as the May
Festival and Messiah perform-
ances.
The other appropriation, for
$4,650, will cover staff needed to
operate the swimming pool unit
of the Women's Athletic Bldg.
starting Feb. 1 and continuing
through June.
Sabbatical leaves for the fall
semester of 1954-55 were granted
to Prof. Ralph Carr Fletcher of
the School of Social Work and
Prof. John W. Riegel of the busi-
ness administration school.
Prof. J. H. Muyskens of the
speech department had his leave
extended. Micheal A. Church, su-
pervisor, of special projects for
the Extension Service, and Prof.
Robert A. McCleary of the psy-
chology department were also
granted leaves.

NEW
AND'
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I

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;.-I

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ii

- Building Plan
(Study Okayed

(Continued from Page 1)

Our

Shelves.

are.

stocked

with

E

and

USED

.4

SL delegate to the Student Affairs
Committee; Lee Fiber, '54, Joint
Judiciary Council chairman, and
Barbara Bos, '54Ed., Women's
Judiciary Council chairman.
Also serving on the committee
are Martha Hill, '54, Panhellenic
Association president; Dolores
Messinger, '55Ed., Assembly pres-
ident; C. A. Mitts, '54, Interfra-
ternity Council president; Roger
Kidston, '56L, Inter-House Coun-
cil president; Pete Lardner, '54E,
former Judiciary delegate to SAC,
and Eric Vetter, '54, Daily city
editor.
Bill Libby, ' 4NR,. is non-par-
ticipating secretary of the group.
Lunn, Daily Managing editor, was
named impartial chairman since
The Daily has no facility interest
in a new student activities struc-
ture.
During its preliminary study, the
group submitted a report last No-
vember to University President
Harlan H. Hatcher and Vice-Pres-
ident Wilbur K. Pierpont.
0
IVORY Q
JEWELRY
O CIGARETTE
BOXES
'K _
a =Y 0
I o cc oP

a

for Every Course in Every Department

SLATER'S
Your College
Bookstore
336 S. State St.

ENGINEERS MEDISLAWYERS
Consult our New and Enlarged Professional Department for your Requirements
Make use of our years of experience in bookselling to ensure

I

yourself of the Best Buy in Town.

[III 1 71

i'i

STUDE

T

SUPPLI ES

TEST YOUR POTENTIAL FOR
A SUCCESSFUL CAREER
IN ADVERTISING!
The 8th Annual Examination for Advertising, sponsored
by the American Association of Advertising Agencies,
will be held on Saturday, February 20, 1954. Examina-
tions will take place in Detroit, Ann Arbor and East
Lansing-exact time and place to be announced soon.
Plan now to take this test of your aptitudes in the follow-
ing types of advertising work:
r Advertising'Planning and Merchandising
* Merchandising ' * Advertising Research
9 Copy Writing a Art and Layout e Media Selection
* Mechanical Production 0 Radio & TV Production
This aptitude test is not a job competition, but it should
help you appraise your own potentialities for advertising
work. In addition, if you do well, the American Associ-
ation of Advertising Agencies will circulate your exam-

of

ALL

KINDS

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r ,

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