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February 17, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-17

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TWo

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 195+

Rental Supervisor Replaces
Old Fashioned 'U' Landlord

By ARLENE LISS
Unlike the landlords of old-
fashioned melodrama, the Univer-
sity landlord does not carry a
black bag for rents.
Instead- he operates from a nlo-
dern office in the Administration
Bldg. and carries the title of Su-
pervisor of Rental Properties.
* * *
THIS POSITION was created
four years ago when it seemed
necessary to have a specific au-
thority to handle the management
of the 90 odd housing units own-
ed by the University. Gordon Han-
sen, a civil engineer, was given
the newly created post after he re-
ceived his masters' degree in busi-
ness administration from the Uni-
versity.
University-owned properties
are generally located in the
campus area-and are on ground
which might, in the future, be
used for expansion. The largest
of these properties is "Jeffer-
ALL-CAMPUS
SNACK
Delivery Service
Delivery on the hour
9-10-11 every evening.
Minimum order of $1.00
per residence.
Ask about our daily special.
SNACK SERVICE
Phone NO 8-6076

son Apartments" on Maynard
St. which is divided into 26
units, the most impressive of
these is Gordon Hall, the home
of President-Emeritus Ruthven.
Applications for housing units
are submitted to the faculty hous-
ing service and it is Hansen's job
to review these applications and
assign homes. Some of the units
are rented by "non-academic staff
members," but the majority are
occupied by faculty members. The
housing service also receives list-
ings from townspeople and uses
these lists to help ease the hous-
ing problem.
* * *
ROUTINE JOBS handled by
Hansen include collecting rents
and "seeing that dripping faucets
are mended." All repair requests
go through his office. Another of
his problems is buying furniture
for the properties. When remodel-
ing is called for Hansen works
with the tenants in drawing up
preliminary plans.
Besides the supervising of the
rental properties, Hansen has
other assignments. During the
construction of Mason and Hav-
en Halls he worked with faculty
representatives to compile a list
of needed materials and was
subsequently responsible for re-
ceiving the furniture and di-
recting its installation.
Hansen works with faculty
members in drawing up prelimi-
nary specifications for University
remodeling jobs which are done
by outside contractors. He then
inspects the remodeling, checking
the quality of materials and work-
manship.
He is currently occupied with a
survey investigating the space dis-
tribution in the biological science
buildings.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive anotice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1954
VOL. LXIV, No. 91
Notices
LS&A Students: No courses may be
added to your original elections after
Fri., Feb. 19.
Change in Student Addresses. Please
report immediately to your school of-
fice any change of address during the
semester.
All veterans who expect to receive
education and training allowanceunder
Public Law 550 (Korea G. I. Bill) must
bring tuition receipt to Office of Vet-
erans' Affairs, 555 Administtation Build-
ing, between Feb. 15 and Feb. 19, 8:30
a.m. to 3:00 p.m., if they have not
already done so.
Art Print Loan Collection pictures
which have not been picked up by
those who signed up for them at the
recent exhibition will be made avail-
able to students in the Art Print Loan
Office, 510 Administration Bldg. be-
tween the hours of 10-5 (noon inclu-
sive) during the week of February 22.
Also on display will be a group of
prints which were not hung at the ex-
hibit due to space limitations. All stu-
dents are eligible to rent one of these
prints. Rental fees range from 25c to
75c per picture. ID cards must be pre-
sented.
On February 25th the collection will
be made available to University staff
on a similar rental basis on presenta-
tion of the University Identification
card.
a The National Council of Alpha Lam-
bda Delta announces that the Alice
Crocker Lloyd Fellowship for Graduate
Study for $750, to be used for graduate
study in any college or university where
there is a chapter of Alpha Lambda
Delta will be awarded again this June.
Any member of Alpha Lambda Delta
graduating in 1952, 1953, or 1954 who
has maintained the Alpha Lambda Delta
scholastic average of 3.5 throughout
her college career is eligible. This year's
seniors may apply if they have main-
tained this average to the end of the
first semester of this year.
The committee of award will judge
on (1) scholastic record, (2) the recom-
mendations submitted, (3) the sound-
ness of the applicant's project and pur-
pose, and (4) to some extent on need.
Interested women should obtain ap-
plications from Dean Bacon and dis-
cuss the matter with her.
Teaching Candidates. There will be a
General Meeting from 11-12 a.m. on
Thurs., Feb. 18, in 4051 Administration
Bldg. for all those who are interested
in receiving information about the
Long Beach, California Public Schools.
There will be colored slides shown.
Those people who are having personal
interviews with the representatives from
Long Beach are also urged to attend
this meeting.
Teaching Candidates. Mr. Pylam, As-
sistant Superintendent from Grand
Rapids, Mich., will be on campus Thurs.,
Feb. 18, to interview teaching candi-
dates. He is interested in seeing both
elementary teaching candidates and
vocal and instrumental music teach-
ers. He will be here in March to inter-
view candidates in other fields. Any-
one who is interested in making an ap-
pointment to see Mr. Pylam should
contact The Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration Bldg., NO 3-1511,
Ext. 489.
Summer Employment. The Bureau of
Appointments will have a meeting from
1 to 5 p.m. Wed., Feb. 17, at the Mich-
igan Union, Room 3-A All students in-
terested in camping, resort, business
or industrial positions for the summer
are invited to attend.
Male Camp Counselors. Mr. Douglas
Salisbury, Director of the Detroit YMCA
Camp, will be interviewing prospective
counselors in the Kalamazoo Room of
the Michigan League on Thurs., Feb. 18,
from 4:30 to 7:30. Interested persons

may call the Bureau of Appointments,
NOrmandy 3-1511, Ext. 2614.
Camp Personnel. Mr. Aaron Gornbein
of Camp Tanuga, Kalkaska, Michigan,
will be interviewing prospective coun-
selors and specialties, such as arts and
crafts, program directors, and horse-
back riding instructors, at the Bureau
of Appointments on Thurs., Feb. 18. He
is interested in both male and female
personnel. Interested persons may con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments. NOr-
mandy 3-1511. Ext. 2614, for appoint-
ments.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS-
WEEK OF FEB. 22
Tues., Feb. 23:
The National City Bank of Cleveland
will have a representative on the cam-
pus on Feb. 23 to interview June men
graduates in Bus. Ad. or LS&A about
its Management Training Program lead-
ingto executive positions in banking.
Wed., Feb. 24:
The Ohio Boxboard Co., of Rittman,
Ohio, will visit the Bureau of Appoint-
ments on Feb. 24 to talk with June
men graduates in Bus. Ad. or LS&A
about Industrial Sales positions.
The Employers Mutual Liability In-
surance Co. of Wisconsin will inter-
view Bus. Ad. or LS&A June graduates,
particularly economics majors, on Feb.
24, for positions as Claims Adjusters,
Underwriters, Group Sales Representa-

the home office Advertising Depart-
ment.
Thurs., Feb. 25:
The Household Finance Corp., Chi-
cago, Ill., will visit the Bureau on Feb.
25 to talk with men June graduates,
Bus. Ad. or LS&A, about the firm's
Accelerated Training Program.
The State Mutual Life Assurance Co.,
of Worcester, Mass., 'will have a repre-
sentative on the campus on Feb. 25 to
interview June and August men grad-
uates, Bus. Ad. or LS&A, for positions
as Home Office Group Sales Representa-
tives, Underwriters, prefer students with
math courses), as Accountants.
Swift & Co., Chicago, Ill., will visit
the campus on Feb. 25 to interview
June men graduates, Bus. Ad. or LS&A,
interested in Sales, Accounting, Office
Administration, and Production. The
company would also like to talk with
June graduates in Mechanical, Archi-
tectural, or Civil Engineering as well as
women June graduates for employment
in Chicago as stenographers or clerks in
the company's Commercial Research
Dept.
The Operations Evaluation Group
(Washington, D.C.) of the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology will have
a representative at the Bureau on Feb.
26 to interview mathematicians, physi-
cal chemists, and physicists at the Mast-
ers and PhD level for positions on its
research staff.
Thurs., Feb. 18:
Inland Steel Co., in Chicago, Ill., will
be at the ]Bureau of Appointments on
Feb. 18 to interview June men for the
company's Management Training Pro-
gram. Bus. Ad. and LS&A graduates are
eligible to make appointments.
Travelers Insurance Co., of Hartford,
Conn., will interview June men grad-
uates, Bus. Ad. or LS&A, on Feb. 18
about the company's Group Field Ser-
vice Training Program, as well as posi-
tions in Agency, Claim and Branch Of-
fice Administration. The representative
will also be interested in talking with
Math majors for actuarial positions. In
addition the company is offering a sum-
mer training program in actuarial
science for which the interviewer will
see undergraduate students.
Fri., Feb. 19:
Northern Trust Co., in Chicago, Ill.,
will have a representative at the Bureau
on Feb. 19 to interview June men grad-
uates, Bus. Ad. or LS&A, for Manage-
ment Training Programs in banking,
operations, personnel, accounting, ad-
vertising, market research, statistics,
and public relations.
Students wishing to schedule appoint-
ments to see any of the companies
listed above may contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Administration
Bldg., Ext. 371.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
Museum of Art, the Department of An-
thropology, and the Department of Fine
Arts, "African Sculpture," Ladislas
Segy, Director of the Segy Gallery, New
York, Thurs., Feb. 18, 4:15 p.m., Audi-
torium B. Angell Hall.
Mrs. Lydia Kirk, wife of Admiral
Kirk, recent Ambassador to Russia, will
be presented tomorrow, 8:30 p.m., at
Hill Auditorium, as the fifth number
on the 1953-54 Lecture Course. Author
of "Postmarked, Moscow," Mrs. Kirk's
lecture, "Life in Russia Today," will
give an intimate picture of life be-
hind the Iron Curtain. Tickets go on
sale today at the Auditorium box office
which is open today 10-1, 2-5 and to-
morrow from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Academic Notices
Make-up Examinations in History.
Sat., Feb. 27, 9:00-12:00 a.m. See your
instructor for permission and then sign
list in History Office.
Topology Seminar. Organizational
meeting on Wed., Feb. 17, at 11 a.m.,
3017 Angell Hall.
Geometry Seminar, Wed., Feb. 17, 7
p.m., 3001 Angell Hall. Mr. W.Al-Dhahir
will talk on The natural extensions of
configurations.
Seminar in Applied Mathematics will
meet Thurs, Feb. 18, at 4 in 247 West
Engineering. Dr. R. K. Ritt will con-
tinue his lectures on Theory of Dis-
tribution.
Course 402, the Interdisciplinary Sem-
inar in the Application of Mathematics
to the Social Sciences, will meet on
Thurs., Feb. 18, in 3409 Mason, at 4
p.m. Dr. A. Bruce Clarke of the Depart-
ment of Mathematics will speak on
"The Theory of Waiting Lines and De-
lays."
Orientation Seminar in Mathematics.
Organizational meeting will be held Fri.,
Feb. 19, at 3 o'clock in 3001 Angell
Hall.
The University Extension Service an-
nounces openings in the following
classes: (Registration for these classes
may be made in 164 School of Bus-

ness Administration, on Monroe St.,
6:30-9:30 p.m., or in 4501 Administra-,
tion Building, 8 to 5 through the day.)
General Semantics (Scientific Living)
. Applications of general semantics to
personal and social problems and to
international relations; review of the
literature of general semantics. Al-
though this course is a continuation of
Course I, the lecture and discussions

will be adjusted also to those who have
had no previous instruction in the
subject. Eight weeks. $8.
Instructor, Clarence L. Meader, Pro-
fessor Emeritus of General Linguistics.
Wed., Feb. 17, 7 p.m., 170 Business
Administration Building.
Myths, Stories, and Legends. Gods and
heroes in the Western tradition. An
examination of classical mythologies
and their remnants in use today with
a survey of other mythologies: Norse,
Persian, American. Meets on alternate
Wednesdays. Eight weeks. $8.
Instructor, John E. Bingley, Instru-
tor in History.
Wed., Feb. 17, 7:30 p.m., 69 Admin-
istration Building.
Engineering Materials. An introduc-
tory course in metals, alloys, cement,
clay products, protective coatings, fuels
and water. A basic course in all fields
of engineering. (Production Engineer-
ing 1, two hours of undergraduate
credit.) $18.
Instructor, William C. Truckenmiller,
Associate Professor of Production En-
gineering.
Wed., Feb. 17, 7 p.m., 3313 East En-
gineering Building.
Electrical Engineering Principles. De-
signed to cover the following subjects:
fundamental units, circuit parameters,
single and three phase circuits, trans-
formers, motor control and applica-
tions, and electric wiring. Lecture and
discussion periods. Offered in co-opera-
tion wiibxthe Ann Arbor Engineers'
Club. Sixteen weeks. $18.
Instructor, John J. Carey, Associate
Professor of Electrical Engineering.
Wed., Feb. 17, 7 p.m., 2080 East E-
gineering Building.
Concerts
Paul Badura-Skoda, distinguished
young Viennese pianist, will make his
Ann Arbor debut in the seventh con-
cert of the current Choral Union Series,
Wednesday evening, Feb. 17, at 8:30, in
Hill Auditorium. He will play the fol-
lowing program: Bach Partita No. 2
in C minor; Beethoven Sonata in C
minor; Bartok Suite, Opus 14; and the
Brahms Sonata in F minor, Op. 5.
Tickets are available at the offices
of the University Musical Society in
Burton Tower, at $3.00, $2.50, $2.00, and
$1.50 each; and will also be on sale
at the Hill Auditorium box office after
7 o'clock on the night of the perform-
ance.
Events Today
The Research Club of the University
of Michigan. The fifth meeting of the
Research Club will be held in the Am-
phitheater of the Rackham Building
this evening at 8 p.m. The following
papers will be given: Professor Horace
Miner (Sociology): "A Quasi-experi-
mental Study of Culture Change in
Algeria;" Professor William H. Burt
(Zoology): "A Month with Some Hud-
son Bay Eskimos," (illustrated). Open
to members only.
Lydia Mendelssohn Box Office is ac-
cepting mail orders now for season
tickets for the Department of Speech
1954 SPRING PLAYBILL for $3.25 -
$2.60 - $1.90. Student season tickets
are available for opening nights at $1.50.
Included on the season tickets are Rich-
ard Strauss' comic opera, ARIADNE OF
NAXOS, produced with the School of
Music, March 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6; Shakes-
peare's THE TAMING OF THE SHREW,
March 25, 26 and 27; and Eugene Hoch-
man's 1953 Hopwood award play, VER-
ANDA ON THE HIGHWAY, April 22,
23 and 24.
Le Cercle Francais will hold its first
meeting of the semester this even-
ing at 8 p.m. in the Michigan League.
Mr. Meyerstein will speak on Renais-
sance Music in France, with examples to
demonstrate. A coffee-hour will follow.
Everyone welcome!
Students for Democratic Action. First
meeting of the Spring Semester to-
night at 7:30 p.m., at the Michigan
Union. Speaker: James Farmer of the
Student League for Industrial Democ-
racy. Subject: The Unfinished Tasks of
Democracy. This topic will include a
discussion of the pending Supreme
Court decision on the "separate but
equal" school issue.
The Literary College Conference Steer-
ing Committee will hold an important
meeting this afternoon at 5 p.m. in
Dean Robertson's office in Angell Hall.
JGP Central Committee. There will
be a meeting of the Central Commit-
tee of JGP at 8:30 p.m. tonight, at the
League, All Committee members must
be present.
American Chemical Society Lecture,
.this evening, 7:30 p.m., 1300 Chem-
istry Building. Customary dinner for
the speaker prior to the talk will be
held at 5:45 p.m. Dr. Herman F. Mark
of the Polytechnic Institute of Brook-
lyn will speak on "Block and Graft

Copolymers."
Wesley Foundation. Wednesday morn-
ing matin at 7:30. Regular Mid-Week
Refresher Tea in the lounge, 4-5:30.
Smoker Tonight for all freshmen and
sophomore Army and Air Force cadets
interested in pledging the National Hon-
orary Military Society of PERSHING
RIFLES. The smoker will be held on
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78' 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a fine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Ladies Blue Shaeffer Snorkel pen
Thurs. Marie, 4033 Alice Lloyd. )101A
LOST-Gold International watch with
black suede band. Reward. Call Jean
Cooper, NO 3-5974. ) 100A
LOST-Green and Blue Plaid Scarf in
Angell Auditorium B. Call Sue Blau,
NO 2-3225. )104A
RED SHOES-Lost in Angell Hall Feb.
12. Call Barbara Goldblum. 2-3119.
Reward. )103A
LOST-Black wallet lost in vicinity of
Orpheum Theater. $2 reward. Call
Charles Mitts, Nd 2-4591. )102A
A, FOR SALE
1940 PLYMOUTH CLUB COUPE-Blue,
radio and heater, new rubber. Excel-
lent condition throughout; 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )292B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sx,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
1941 CHRYSLER-4-door, blue; radio,
heater, new tires, '54 license. Lots of
miles! 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)293B
1939 PLYMOUTH COUPE-Black; mech-
anically perfect. 222 W. Washington,
NO 2-4588. )294B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Keystone Model A7 16mm movie
camera with F2.7 lens, $55. Purchase
Camera Shop, 1116 So. University,
NO 8-6972. )281B
1941 FORD CLUB COUPE-Blue. Heater
and radio. Mechanically perfect. 222
W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )295B
RECLINING, UPHOLSTERED tapestry
chair with wooden arms and footstool
-fair condition, $10. Two large side-
boards, $8 each, coal hot water heater
with two stovepipes, $7.50-Phone NO
2-9020. Muntz table model 14" TV
set, hardly used, $60. Six compart-
ment Rabbitt Hutch, well built, $15.
)284B
1949 CHEVROLET-4-door, green. Radio,
heater, low mileage. 222 W. Wash-
ington, NO 2-4588. )296B
STAMPS-U.S. or foreign sent on ap-
proval. Price list free. Sharrott, 1039
Grassmere, Far Rockaway 91, N.Y'
)288B
1q37 CHRYSLER-2-door, well cared for.
Greased regularly, good motor, bat-
tery, and tires; reliable transportation,
only $75. Phone NO 2-9020. )286B
1950 PLYMOUTH-Radio and heater, 4-
door. New license and all taxes paid!
$595. 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)297B
WEBSTER- CHICAGO wire recorder in-
cluding foot controls. Unused-rea-
sonable. Phone Manchester, Garden
8-3221. )298B

FOR SALE
ENLARGER 35mm excellent,$10 also new
LEICA type camera just imported.
NO 2-2107 after 5 p.m. Schafitz. )305B
FOR SALE-Olds 88 1950 4 door, radio,
heater, seat covers, white sidewalls.
17,000 "actual miles, $950. 1420 Pear
St., NO 3-8775. )301B
1951 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION-2-door,
radio, heater, and hydramatic. 2600
miles; one owner. Real nicel Phone
NO 2-4588, Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. )306B
EXTREMELY reliable 1940 Plymouth at
117 Warden Ave., after 5. )300B
A MEDIUM blue-grey gaberdine suit,
Single breasted, sport style. Like new,
size 40 regular. Very reasonably pric-
ed. Call NO 3-1904 after 8 p.m. on
weekdays only. Ask for Steve. )299B
FOR SALE-English bike. Excellent con-
dition, $36. Call after 6 p.m. - NO
2-3288. )302B
1946 FORD-2-door, black; radio and
heater. For quick sale-taxes and li-
cense. $219. Phone NO 2-4588, Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington. )307B
BATTERI ES $5 EXCH.
Guaranteed Free Installation
BATTERY STORES ASSOCIATED
Liberty and Ashley
A REAL BUY!-1950 Chevrolet, radio,
heater, new tires. NO 2-7761. After
5 p.m. or weekend. )312B
CANARIES-Singers and females. Para-
keets or Budgies. $5 and up. Price de-
pends on sex and color. Bird cages
and supplies. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. 7th.
)311B
SCHWINN World Traveler man's bicycle.
Excellent condition. Call S. Quad Ex.
643. )310B
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED 4 room flat for rent,
adults only. Heat and water furn-
ished, 8985 Island Lake Rd. 1 mile
west of Dexter. HA 6-9411. )23C
GIRL, PREFERABLY STUDENT wanted
to share 3-room apartment. Excellent
location. Call NO 3-3258 after 5. )29C
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Rooms by Day or Week
Campus Tourist Homes. Ph. NO 3-8454
518 E. Williams St. (near State)
)25D
ONE LARGE SINGLE room near campus
-maid service, refrigerator privileges.
Call NO 2-7108. )41D
NEWLY FURNISHED Double Room -
Four blocks from campus. Foreign
students welcome. Phone NO 2-9625,
1111 White St. )46D
ROOMS for Male Students near Union.
Cooking privileges. Call NO 3-8454.
)40D
SINGLE AND DOUBLE ROOM - Girls,
close to campus. 427 Hamilton Pl.
Phone 2-3086. )47D

PERSONAL
COFFEE is up but our mags are' still
only 6c-8c each. Try a cup-ola and
get the reading habit. Time, Life,
Newsweek, SatEvePost, etc. Student
Periodical, NO 5-1843. )60F
ANY ENGINEER graduating in June Or
August, 1954, with a BS or MS degree
in Chemical, Mechanical, Electrical,
or Civil Engineering or Naval Archi-
tecture who might be interested in
the opportunities offered by the Pro-
duction Department of Shell Oil Co.
can contact Mr. W. J. Fairbanks any
time from 9:00 a.m, to 5:00 p.m on
Thursday, Feb. 18 in Room 4 (Lobby)
East Engr. Bldg. This meeting would
not be an interview, but an opportun-
ity to talk to a graduate of Michigan
now employed by Shell Oil Company.
)61r
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING SERVICES. Experienced in
manuscripts, theses, and term papers.
Call NO 2-7605, Mrs. Conner. )281
TYPEWRITERSI Portable and Standard
for rent; sales, and service.
MORRILLS

RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home -- Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1214 So. Univ., Ph.. NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of iast Efg,
314 State St., Phone NO 8-7177

ii

)51

WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Buff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. )21
PIANO SERVICE - Tuning, repairing.
Work guaranteed. Call University Mu-
sic House, NO 8-7515. )27t
TYPING -- Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Phone NO 8-7590. 830
So. Main. )3I
REAL ESTATE
FACULTY FAMILIES wanted to build
homes in natural area near forth
Campus. Frontage on Vorhies and
Warren Roads. No lots less than one
acre. Box 5. )40
BLU E irD

READ
DAILY
CLASSI F.IEDS

:....

ENDING THURSDAY
No Man's Mats.-50c
Eves. 80c
ever had
it so
good!
Y* w 1ALEC GUINNEWr
YVONNE D.CAMP
CELIA JOHNSON ,
A Lw."M ~ w9s
ALSO
A Creative Animation
by U. P. A.
of Edgar Allen Poe's
"The Tell Tale Heart"
Starting Friday
"Riot In Cell Block 11"

-4

Starts pT:
TOD

MATS. 5Cc
Eves. 80c

FOR SALE by original owner-Smith-
Corona portable typewriter. Standard
keyboard, tabulator, in excellent con-
dition. Maroon finish, black carry-
ing case, $40.00. Phone NO 2-8586 af-
ter 7 p.m. )303B
1941 CHEVROLET-4-door, radio, heat-
er, and good rubber. Excellent trans-
portation.' $95. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington. Phone NO 2-4588.
)308B
APPLIANCES, cameras, radios, toys,
typewriters, watches, etc. Large coded
wholesale catalogue 25c. David B.
Vogt, 2214 Iroquois, Flint. )304B

1'*

JU

GRILLER STRING QUARTET

SIDNEY GRILLER, 1st Violin
JACK O'BRIEN, 2nd Violin

PHILIP BURTON, Viola
COL IN HAMPTON, Cello

and the

THE STUDENT PLAYERS
who have in the past presented
such outstanding dramatic
successes as:

REGINALD KELL PLAYERS
REGINALD KELL, Clarinet MELVIN RITTER, Viola
JOEL ROSEN, Piano AURORA NATOLA, Cello
in CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
Friday and Saturday, 8:30; Sunday, 2:30 - February 19, 20, 21
RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
Tickets (3 concerts) $2.50, $3.50; single $1.25, $1.75
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY - BURTON TOWER

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BRIGADOON
PHILADELPHIA STORY

JOAN OF LORRAINE
FINNIANS RAINBOW

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NOW PROUDLY PRESENT

TOMORROW- 8:30 P.M.

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Also Woody Woodpecker *

Sport * Headline News

tives, or beginning Salesmen. The com-
pany is also interested in talking with
Journalism graduates for a position in

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PAUL BADURA-SKODA
Viennese Pianist
ANN ARBOR DEBUT

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LYDIA

KIRK

Wife of Adm. Kirk, recent
Ambassador to Russia

Author of
"Postmarked, Moscow"

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