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February 09, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-09

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LY, FEBRUARY 9, 1954

TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

V. FEERrARY R. 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

TWO VIEWS ON IKE:
Politicos To Hear Scholle, Pollock-

August (Gus) Scholle, and Prof.
James K. Pollock will examine the
Eisenhower administration from
two viewpoints this week as part of
the opening meetings of the cam-
pus political clubs.
Both the Young Democrats and
Young Republicans will begin se-
mester activity Thursday night.
The Students for Democratic Ac-
tion have made tentative plans for
a meeting either - Tuesday or
Thursday of next week.
* * *
THE YD'S, headed by Charles

Sleicher, Grad, will feature Michi-
gan CIO Council leader Gus
Scholle at their first meeting 7:30
Thursday in the Union.
Scholle will speak on "Labor
Looks at Eisenhower," covering
the relation of the present ad-
ministration to labor. Some elec-
tion forecasts for this year and
1956 will also be included in the
labor leader's talk.
After earlier experience with the
AFofL, Scholle became one of the
organizers of the CIO. He is now

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also a regional director for the
union.' .
The YD's, according to Sleicher,
are optimistic of a "good semes-
ter," with hopes of topping 50 in
membership. Various positions are
currently vacant, including the of-
fice of Vice President. One of the
orders of the meeting Thursday
will be to fill them.
* *. *
FOREIGN policy expert Prof.
James K. Pollock will highlight
the Young Republican's opening
session at 7:15 p.m. Thursday, also
at the Union.
Prof. Pollock will tell the
group "Why I Still Like Ike,
reviewing the President's first
year in office.
YR President Malcomn Schlus-
berg, '55, is again noping to ex-
ceed 104 members in the club, a
figure which was reached last fall.
A portion of the meeting will be
organizational in nature, including
a discussion of plans for the se-
mester.
* S S
SDA WILL BEGIN their semes-
ter activity next week. Early plans
called for a speaker and discus-
sion on "The Role of the Liberal
on the Contemporary Scene."
Club President Dave Kornbluh,
'54, stressed that plans for the se-
mester will include an effort to
show the present need for a lib-
eral movement. Expectations now
are for a membership of "at least
30."

Calendar of Events
TODAY-
"How Does a Community See Its Needs?" will be discussed by
Richard Posten of the University of Southern Illinois at 4 p.m. in the
School of Public Health Auditorium. Under the auspices of the School
of Public Health, this is the John Sundwall Memorial Lecture.
The Michigan-Denver University hockey game will be held
at 8 p.m. in the Coliseum.
Hanson Baldwin, military analyst of the New York Times, will
discuss "Where Do We Go From Here" during an Oratorical Associa-
tion Lecture at 8:30 p.m. in Hill Auditorium.
* * . *
TOMORROW--
Daniel R. Fitzpatrick, editorial cartoonist for the St. Louis Post-
Dispatch, will speak at 3 p.m. in Auditorium A, Angell Hall, as part
of "The Press and Civil Liberties in Crisis" series, under the auspices
of the Department of Journalism.
The Toronto Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Sir
Ernest MacMillan, will perform at 8:30 p.m. in Hill Auditorium as
part of the Choral Union Series, under the uspices of the University
Musical Society.
* * * * '
THURSDAY-
Sponsored by the Association of Church-Related Colleges, the
Conference of Church-Related Colleges will convene here. Registration
will be held at 9:30 a.m. in the East Alcove of the Rackham Bldg. A
general session will be held including a panel discussion of "Student
Counseling in Relation to College Admissions" at 10 a.m. in the East
Conference Rm. of the Rackham Bldg.
"Human Ecology on a Pacific Atoll" will be discussed by Prof.
Marston Bates of the zoology department during a luncheon at noon
in the Union. "The Extension Services of the University," a panel
discussion, will be held during .a general session at 1:30 p.m. in the
East Conference Rm. of the Rackham Bldg.
Sir Herbert Read, literary and art critic, will discuss "The
Fundamental Conflict in Modern Art" at -4:15 p.m. in Audi-
torium A. Angell Hall.
Prof. Dow V. Baxter of the botany department will speak on
"Pathology in the Future Forest Practice in Alaska" at 8 p.m. in
Rackham Amphitheater. This Phi Sigma lecture is under the auspices
of the Department of Forestry.
FRIDAY-
The Fifth Annual Institute on Advocacy, under the auspices of
the Law School with the co-operation of the Michigan Law Insti-
tute, will begin with registration at noon in the Rackham Building.
Program sessions will be held on "The Office Side of Trial Practice"
at 2 and 8 p.m. in the Rackham Bldg.
The Michigan-Colorado College hockey games will be played at
8 p.m. in the Coliseum.

SL Confab
The Student Legislature con-
stitution and structure commit-
tee will meet at 7:30 p.m. today
in Strauss-Anderson dining rm.
of East Quadrangle to discuss
methods of recall for SL mem-
bers, a student government tax
and qualifications for candi-
dates.
The discussion is open to the
public.
New Courses
Offered in AA
Extension Plan
The University is offering 13
new courses in its Ann Arbor ex-
tension program for adults, Mrs.
Charles A. Fisher, supervisor of the
program for the Ann Arbor area,
announced yesterday.,
Most of the 40 classes scheduled
for the second semester open this
week. Registration may be made
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Monday
through Thursday until February
18 in Rm. 164 of the School of
Business Administration.
Early registration is advised for
art classes and others in which en-
rollment is limited, however, and
may be made in 4501 Administra-
tion Bldg. during regular office
hours.
Classes offered for the first
time in the Ann Arbor exten-
sion program include Electric
Welding, Electrical Engineering
Principles, Engineering Mater-
ials, Human Heredity; Myths,
Stories, and Legends; The Film
in America; The Gospel Behind
the Gospel Narrative; Modern
European and American Paint-
ing; Design Workshop; Secretar-
ial Procedures; Family Health;;
Germany Since 1870; and The
Madrigal Singers.
A total of six courses in engi-
neering are scheduled this semes-
ter.
Bulletins describing the courses
and giving details as to the time
and place of meeting may be ob-
tained by calling or writing the
University Extension Service. The
Ann Arbor office is at 4501 Ad-
ministration Building; telephone
NO 3-1511, Ext. 2887.
FARMERS
PRODUCE
MARKET
SALES FROM FARMER
DIRECTLY TO CONSUMER
Open Every Saturday
8 A.M. to 3 P.M.
DETROIT STREET
between Catherine & Kingsleyw

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THE CITY BEAT

Revision of Ann Arbor's city
charter, plans for the site of a new
city hall and the annual March of
Dimes were in the local spotlight
during the three week student
vacation.
Hitting at a charge made re-
cently by City Council President
George W. Sallade. who said that
the present government system of
an elected council and mayor re-
sulted in "confusion, divided auth-
ority and buck-passing," Mayor
William E. Brown, Jr.. urged a
charter study group not to tamper
with the city charter unless the
benefit of any 'changes is certain.
* * *
MAYOR BROWN testified at a
meeting of the members of the
Charter Study Commission and 150
local citizens, and stated that Ain
Arbor's present system of govern
ment here is "as nearly perfect
and democratic as any that can
be devised."
The mayor did, however, sug-
gest changes in the charter. In-
cluded in his proposed amend- .
ments were a four-year term for

the mayor (the present term is
for two years) and to give the
mayor authority to hire a "sub-
ordinate" to the mayor wh&
would coordinate the work of
the several departments.
The point Mayor Brown stress-
ed throughout his discussion be-
fore the group was that whatever
charter changes the Commission
produces should be put on the bal-
lot at regular election time.
FOLLOWING criticism by a
group of citizens on the proposed
site of the new city hall, two mem-
bers of the City Council suggested
a different site for the future
structure.
A proposed Ann St. site would
have caused the destruction or re-
moval of several business estab-
lishments according to a group of
citizens. The latest possible site
is located in the 700 block on N.
Main.
Washtenaw County staged the
annual Mother's March for the
polio fund last week and solicited
$3,000 more for the March of
Dimes than last year.

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