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May 18, 1954 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-18

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.t
TUESDAY, X 18, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THnEE

Michigan House Nips Wenley in Softball

layoffs

J

3-2 Triumph 'M' Netmen Sink Purdue Ball Team Virtually Out

Michigan Golfers Defeat MSC,_19-17

Nets Victor
Finals Berth
By HAP ATHERTON
Michigan House, trailing Wen-
ley House, 2-0, with two out in the
last half of the sixth inning, stag-
ed a dramatic comeback yesterday
to down Wenley, 3-2, copping a
playoff berth for first place in the
I-M residence hall softball league.
Setsuo Masaki drove in the two
winning runs on a Texas League
single to left, after one of his
teammates had driven in one run.
Bob Delude; on the mound for
Wenley, had pitched a tremend-
ous game up to the final inning.
He had struck out 12 men, while
walking none, and had allowed
only one hit, but the winners took
him for three runs on three hits
in the final inning to break his
strikeout streak.
IN AN EXCITING third-place
playoff, Green House edged An-
derson House, 6-5. This was an-
other game won in the last half
of the last inning. Green led, 5-1,
going into the last inning but
Anderson tied it up in the top
of that inning on one walk, one
single, two doubles, and one man
hit by a pitched ball.
With the score tied at 5-5,
Duane Dunlap smashed the
game-winning homerun down
the right field line In the bot-
tom of the inning. Frank Balle
was on the mound for the win-
ners, while Phil Des Lauriers
pitched for Anderson.
Allen-Rumsey dropped Reeves,
8-5, in a fourth-place playoff con-
test. Both teams exploded in the
) first inning, Reeves with five runs,
and Allen-Rumsey with seven.
** *
GEORGE HOAGLIN led the
pitching and hitting departments
for Van Tyne in its victory over
Winchell, 7-2, in another third
place playoff. Hoaglin allowed
only three hits, and four walks to
the West Quader's while blasting
a double and a triple in two times
at bat.
In the only second place play-
off, Hayden dumped Adams, 9-6.
Gary Boe's pitching was one of
the deciding factors in the win.
He allowed the losers only one
hit, and eight walks, striking
out three,
In other playoffs, Hinsdale for-
feited to Scott (fourth place), and
Williams forfeited to Strauss
(fifth place). In the faculty league,
Psychology A thrashed Bacteriol-
ogy 19-9, Psychology B crushed
Political Science 22-2, and Phy-
sics dumped Zoology 12-3. In an
I-M fraternity horseshoes match,
Sigma Phi Epsilon defeated P
Lambda Phi, 3-0.

j - - - _ -- j .

For Third Straight Win

Of Big Ten Penant Race

Special to The Daily
Outclassing its opponent for the
third consecutive meet in the past
four days, Michigan's tennis squad
trounced Purdue yesterday, 8-1,
on the Boilermakers' home courts
to raise the Wolverines' Big Ten'
record this season to four wins,
one loss, and a tie.
Following the two impressive
wins over Wisconsin and Ohio'
State last Friday and Saturday,
the Wolverine victory indicates-
the possibility of a high finish for

pair of 6-4 sets. The Boilermak-
ers' Supple was the tallest net-
ter to face the Wolverines this
season. However, his size was
not enough to halt the victors
in their near-sweep of matches.
Bob Nederlander added the
fourth Michigan point of the day
by drubbing Brad Ward, 6-1, 6-3.
Ray Betz became the first Purdue
man even to salvage a set from
the high-flying Wolverines when
he extended Bob Mitchell to three
sets before losing 6-0, 3-6, 6-1.
THE LONE Michigan loss came
in the number six singles match
between Ron Morgan and Boiler-
maker John Bartlett. Bartlet
swept the first set, 6-0, but Mor-
gan rallied to even the match with
a 6-4 victory in the second set.
The final set was closely contested'
with Bartlet finally triumphing,
7-5.
The three Wolverines doubles
combinations all were success-
ful in finishing the afternoon in
fine style for Michigan. Paulus
and Paley downed Cole and Kar-
abel, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4, despite the
fact that Paulus momentarily
sprained his ankle in the sec-
ond set. After a short time out,
play was resumed with Paulus
showing no lasting effects from
his injury.
Mann and Nederlander had lit-
tle trouble in copping the second
doubles match with 7-5 and 6-1
sets against Ward and Supple. The
meet concludel with a long doub-
les encounter between Wolverines
Mitchell and Morgan and Betz
and Bartlet of Purdue. The four
men accounted for all but one of
the four three-game sets of the
day as the Michigan netters scor-
ed a 3-6, 6-3, 13-11 victory to add
to their prolonged singles matches
with the same opponents.
Yesterday's win for the Wol-
verines, who meet Michigan State
in Ann Arbor tomorrow, marks
their eighth win in eleven meets
this year.

By PHIL DOUGLIS
Michigan State's shlgging Spar-
tans all but extinguifed the last
flickering hopes of Michigan's
baseball title chances last week-
end by taking two out of the three
games from the Wolverines.
The Wolverines consequently
drop' to fourth place in the stand-
ings, behind Michigan State, Ohio
State, and Wisconsin. Only a minor
miracle can give the Wolverines
the Conference pennant now,
along with a chance to represent
this region in the NCAA playoffs.
TO GAIN an undisputed title,
the Michigan squad would have
to bowl over Ohio State next Fri-
day and sweep two games from
Indiana here next Saturday. But
that's not all. Michigan would also
have to pray that Indiana beats
Michigan State in a single game
Friday (a minor miracle in itself)
and on top of that Ohio State and
Michigan State must split their
crucial double header Saturday at
Lansing. Wisconsin would also
have to lose at least one of ats
last three games.
Thus everything would have to
go according to schedule in ev-
ery one of seven games next
weekend in order for Michigan
to regain its title.
Logically then, the Big Ten'
champ will probably come out of
the big Spartan-OSU twin bill atj
Lansing. From the exhibition the
Spartans put on here Saturday, it
appears that the Conference flag
may well wave over Old College
Field in Lansing come next Sun-
day.
* * *
THE Kobsmen wrecked Michi-
gan's Jack Ritter, 6-4, Friday at
Lansing, and then stormed Ferry
Field the next day to rack up Marv
Wisniewski in the first game, 8-4.
It took a thrilling seventh inning
home run shot by Howie Tomme-
lein to salvage the second game for!
the Wolverines, 9-8.
One bright spot in the Wolver-
ine picture last weekend was the

sharpness of the big sopho-
more hurler, Dick Peterjohn.
Peterjohn's chucking at Lan-
sing in relief of Ritter was su-
perb, and he nabbed his first
Conference win in relief of Jack
Corbett in Saturday's second
game.
Platewise, Michigan's slump was
quite obvious. One of the league's
top hitters, third sacker Don
Eaddy, went up to bat eleven times
over the weekend, and came out
with only one hit, while usually
dependable hitter Paul Lepley
managedto notch only three hits
in thirteen appearances against
Spartan hurling.
Whether Michigan can sweep all
three games this weekend is also
a big question. If the Buckeyes
throw Paul Ebert, the leagues best
pitcher, at the Wolverines, Michi-
gan's chances will be slim. The
next day, Indiana, though very
weak may cause some trouble.
Despite what goes on in Ann
Arbor this weekend, all eyes will
be on Lansing whei'e the Confer-
ence titans will fight it out in a.
twin bill Saturday. It is there that
the next Conference champion will
in all odds be crowned, barring a
minor miracle which would see
the Wolverines triumphant for
the third straight year.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Great Lakes Navy 7, Northwest-
ern 3
Iowa 18, Notre Dame 1
Purdue 8, Miami (Ohio) 5

Special to The Daily
Playing with scores higher than
average, the Michigan golf squad
managed to edge out Michigan
State, 19-17 in a dual meet at
East Lansing yesteraday after-
noon.
Shooting two fine steady rounds,
Michigan's Captain Jack Stumpfig
carded 73-74-147 to tie for med-
alist honors with MSC's number
three man, Dave Mancour, who
had 71-76-147. Despite his fine
All groups must complete
their I-M golf entries by 6 p.m.
today.
-Earl Riskey
golfing, Stumpfig was unable to
do more than split with Bill Al-
bright.
THE WOLVERINES number two
man, Bob McMasters played very
fine golf for the first twenty-sev
en holes, but became tired on the
back nine of the second round.
However, he still managed to wind
up second low for Michigan and
gain 3% points from his opponent
with 76-77-153.
BIG TEN STANDINGS

Due to scholastic responsibili-
ties, Andy Andrews, who usually
plays in the third spot was un-
able to accompany the team. He
was replaced in the line-up by
Boyd Redner. Playing his first
game in - varsity competition,
Redner, a junior, had the mis-
fortune of being pitted against
Mancour, and though he shot
a very respectable pair of 80's,
he managed to garner only half
a point.
Chuck Blackett fired his habit-
ual one low, one high round in
splitting with his Green and
White opponent, Ken Rodewald,
in the fourth position.

SOPHOMORE Dick ¢ Harrison
scored a disappointing 82-81-163,
yet still managed to collect 4
points for the Maize and Blue as
his opposition in the form of Bill
Bietrich soared to a pair of 83's.
Tad Stanford, who moved to
the sixth position due to his
ailing shoulder, emerged as high
point man for the Wolverines as
he gathered five points on
rounds of 78-79-157.
The Wolverine linksters have
only a tentative meet scheduled
for sometime this week with the
University of Detroit before ad-
vancing to the Western Conference
meet at Minneapolis on May 28
and 29.

GOLFERS'
PRACTICE RANGE
4 miles east of Ann Arbor on U.S. 23 - Near Packard Rd.
We Furnish Clubs Free - Open 12 Noon till 11 P.M.
For the best buy on clubs and bags -SEE US.
Liberal trade-in allowance on clubs and bags.

w si

F,

BOB PALEY
. . . giant killer

Michigan State
Ohio State ...
Wisconsin ..
MICHIGAN
Northwestern
Minnesota ....
Indiana.......
Iowa.........
Purdue.......
Illinois .....

8
9
7
8
6
.5
4
4
3
2

2
3
3
4
4
7
6
8
9
10

.800
.756
.700
.667
.600
.417
.400
.333
.250
.167

I -
--
1
1
i a
2
4
4
6

the squad in the Conference
championship playoffs at Cham-
paign, Ill., at the end of the
month. Only four individual sets'
were lost in the nine matches with
Purdue and one of these was ex-
tended to a 7-5 score.
* * *
AL MANN began the day aus-
piciously for Michigan with an
easy 6-3, 6-0 victory over Pur-
due's number one man, Dick Cole.
Pete Paulus followed with two sets
of 6-4 to down Chuck Karabel for
the second Wolverine point.
In the third match of the day,
Bob Paley topped six-foot seven-
inch Dick Supple in another

r'_1

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ANOTHER BOB FELLER?

Turley StrengthensBaltimorePitching

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for finishing these articles

I

By AL EISENBERG
On of the most talked about
players in the American League
is the pitching sensation of the
Baltimore Orioles, Bob Turley.
A six-foot, two inch, 207-pound-
er from East St. Louis, Ill., Tur-
ley has been fanning the opposi-
tion with such regularity that Bal-
timore rooters are already compar-
ing him with such notables as Wal-
ter Johnson and Bob Feller.

liams, the "Splendid Splinter," American League in hitting with a
awed a crowd of over 40,000 at bloated .378 average. Cass Michaels"
Briggs Stadium on Sunday, as he with .362 is in second place. Al

11

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Probably hIs most notable
pitching performance in the
still infant 1954 campaign was
Fin a losing effort against the
Cleveland Indians. He whiffed
14 frustrated batters, pitched
no-hit ball for eight and one-
third innings, yet lost 2-1.
Playing as a regular for the
first time this season, Ted Wil-

gave a tremendous demonstra-
tion of batting proficiency.
F * * *
WILLIAMS hammered out three
singles in the first game, then came
back in the nightcap with five for
five. Among those five hits in the
second game were two towering
homeruns.
Leading the National League
in hitting at the momentis Ray
Jablonski with an average of
.373. Close on his heels is Phila-
delphia's Granny Hamner with
a matting mark of .370. Round-
ing out the top five in the senior
circuit are Duke Snider, .361,
Stan Musial with .360, and rookie
Cardinal outfielder, Wally Moon
with a .356 batting mark.
Bobby Avila, the Cleveland In-
dian's second basemen, leads the
Tajor LeagUe
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Rosen, with .359, Harry Agganis at
.359, and Ray Boone with a .349
mark round out the elite circle in
the junior circuit.
In the runs-batted-in depart-
ment, Rosen leads the American
League with 33, while Musial
stands atop the National League
with 32.

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L::

A

. THESE ARE-THE
(66rnpionehb

I-10A I rye

pp.. U.S.L.T.A, '
RALDINGA
CHAMPIONSHIP
CHAMPIONSHIP
# w

W
Cleveland ..... .18
Chicago.......19
New York ......17
Detroit ........14
Baltimore ......11
Philadelphia ...10
Washington.... 9
Boston ......... 7

L
10
11
11
10
14
17
17
15

Pct.
.643
.633
.607
.583
.440
.370
.346
.318

P

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a w 'r.. -w. -,, 'f i. y : [ ' + . , - fr
ll-.^ ,' Q

NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
1
2
5%
7%1
8
8
GB
«..,I
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1
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211
3
7 1

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W L
Philadelphia ...16 12
Brooklyn ......16 12
New York......16 13
St. Louis ... ...16 14
Cincinnati .....16 15
Milwaukee .....13 14
Chicago .. . . ...,12 14
Pittsburgh .....10 21

Pct.
.571
.571
.552
.533
.516
.481
.462
.323

4 .1

The Tennis Twins (Spalding-made)' are unmatched
in their record in top tournament play. And here is
the clinching proof: The Wright & Ditson is the only
official tennis ball used in all U.S.L.T.A. National
Championships (since 1887). Official, too, in all U.S.
Davis Cup Matches. Official adoptions of its twin,

L

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