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May 05, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

> W'EDNESDAY, MAY 5, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

SAEl Stops A lpha Delts, 5-0,

on Engel's No-Hitter

SAM Rips Lambda Chi, 8-1,
As Playoffs Get Under Way

By ART EVEN
Cold winds swept South Ferry
Field yesterday, but Earl Engel
was hot as he pitched a no-hit ball
game to lead his Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon teammates to a 5-0 victory
over Alpha Delta Phi in a first
y place playoff tilt.
Engel was in complete command
all the way, whiffing ten and
walking only one bater. SAE sewed
up the game with three runs in the
fifth on Fred Richmond's single,
a walk, and three errors.,
IN ANOTHER first place playoff
encounter .Sigma Alpha Mu ram-
bled past Lambda Chi Alpha, 8-1.
, The Sammies scored at least-one
run in every inning with three
coming in the third. The rally was
highlighted by singles of the bats
of Harold Berritt and Warren
4 Wertheimer, a walk, and an error.
Paul Groffsky turned in a cred-
itable mound performance for
t SAM, fanning seven and giving up
only two safties.
Gill Rodger and the men from
Chi Phi were breezing along 4-1,
in their game with Theta Delta
Chi, when the Theta Delts sud-
denly found the range and be-
gan to blast a few of Rodger's
i choice offerings.
As the final inning opened, Er-
nest Nigg drew a pass, and Gor-
don Coates was safe on an error.

Bob Loucks strode to the plate,
picked the pitch he wanted and
smashed a round tripper.
* * *
THE NEXT batter, Ken Rice,
found another gopher ball wait-
ing, swung, and the Theta Delt left
the field victorious, 5-4.
Duane Schultz allowed but two
hits as Sigma Nu took Phi Kap-
pa Psi in stride, 6-3. Both hits
*ere banged out in the top of
the third inning to give Phi
Kappa Psi a 3-0 lead, but Sigma
Nu roared back with three runs
in the last of the third, then
scored two in fourth to salt the
game away.
One big swish of Kent Shoemak-
er's booming bat provided the win-
ning margin in Alpha Sigma Phi's
6-5 victory over Acacia. Shoe-
maker's circuit clout came off of
starter, and loser, Ted Plough-
man. Tom Biggs went all the way
to pick up the win.
Chi Psi laced Kappa Alpha Psi,
10-2, as losing pitcher Joe Clark
was raked over the coals for 10
hits and four walks. The men
from Chi Psi bated around in both
the first and second inningt. They
scored only three runs in the first,
leaving the sacks lqaded, but five
hits, including a double, produced
seven runs in the second. Sam Wil-
son gave up four hits to record the
win.

Brrrr!
The 40 degree cold wave that
roared into Ann Arbor today
not only brought out winter
overcoats again but ruined the
Michigan sports calendar as
well.
For the second time in two
years, the Notre Dame baseball
team made a trip to Ann Arbor
in vain, while the Western
Michigan-Michigan tennis meet
was also postponed.
Notre Dame had already ar-
rived when its game with Mich-
igan, set for Ferry Field yester-
day, was cancelled, such as was
the case last year when they
came all the way from South
Bend only to run into a typical
Ann Arbor rainy day.
Luckily, Western Michigan
had not left Kalamazoo when
Michigan net coach Bill Mur-
phy called off the match. The
tennis match will be played,
however on May 12.
The baseball game with Notre
Dame will probably not be
played, for Michigan's league
leading nine swings back into
conference action this weekend
with a western trip, and is book-
ed solidly from here on in.
College Roundup
BASEBALL
Purdue 4, Butler 3
Illinois 7, Southern 111. 4
TRACK
Albion 8211, Hillsdale 43!.
GOLF
Wayne 14',, Michigan Normal 31

<i

By PHIL DOUGLIS
The man who brought to Michi-
gan such sports as basketball,
swimming, and ice hockey, died
Sunday.
The passing of Phillip G. Bar-
telme, athletic director of the Uni-;
versity of Michigan from 1909 to
1921, was marked by only a tiny
one inch story in a Detroit news-
paper, quite a come-down for a
man who contributed so muth to
the Michigan sports scene.
* * *
PERHAPS the reason why Bar-
telme was forgotten was that he
was succeeded in 1921 by the im-
mortal Fielding H. Yost, and the
mighty "Mr. Michigan" soon all1
but obscured the accomplishmentsi
of Bartelme.
Bartelme. who was the second
full-time athletic director of the
University, succeeding Charles
Baird. was formerly a member of a
banking firm in Chicago. Follow-
ing his tenure here he served as
president of the Sacremento team
in the Pacific Coast Baseball
League.
* * *
HOWEVER Bartelme did not
devote all his efforts to athletic
contests. He was a builder, and he
was ashamed of Michigan's ram-
shackle football stadium at Fer-
ry Field. In 1914 he ordered an
entirely new structure built, and
soon the huge concrete and steel

S
C

PACED ATHLETIC EXPANSION:
Former Michigan Athletic Director Dies

stands dominated the Michigan four Big Ten titles in the same
campus. day back in 1919.
Bartelme also wanted a new However Bartelme will be re-
locker room building construct- membered most for the three
ed for Michigan's great teams, sports which became varsity activ-
so he built the Ferry Field Club- ities during his tenure here. In
house, now the Athletic Admin- 1917 Bartelme inaugurated basket-
istration building. Once com ball here, and four years later in-
plete with locker rooms and stalled hockey and swimming as
showers, this building still stands varsity sports.
as a testimony to Bartelme, Last Sunday afternoon Bartelme
though offices have replaced the passed away in his Carmel, Cali-
showers. fornia home at the age of 78, a
* * * man who may not be remembered
GREAT Coaches worked under as long as his successor Yost will
Bartelme, from Fielding Yost him- be, but who did his part neverthe-,
self to the famed Branch Rickey, less in forging the great Michigan
baseball's "Mahatma." who coach- athletic tradition that followed
ed the Wolverine nine for two sea-
I i B t

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Chicago .........13 6 .684
Detroit ...,...... 9 5 .643
Cleveland ........ 9 7 .563
Philadelphia ... 9 7 .563
New York ........ 7 9 .438
Washington ... 6 10 .375
Baltimore ........ 5 9 .357
Boston........... 4 9 .308

NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
19
41
5
6

W L
Philadelphia .....10 6
Brooklyn......... 9 7
St. Louis........10 8
Cincinnati .......10 , S
New York........ 9 9
Chicago ......... 6 7
Milwaukee....... 6 9
Pittsburgh....... 7 13

Major League Standings

Pct.
.625
.563
.556
.556
.500
.462
.400
.350

GB
1
1
3%
31,
5

s
k
E
c

1

sons urng aremes regime.
Athletes too, made names for
themselves under Bartelme's
reign. George Sisler later to
make baseball's hall of fame
played here. Dave Allerdice led
many Yost grid squads, and the
immortal "King" Carl Johnson
established himself as America's
top track star when he won

For the
Maser's Tonch
. .. in ...
HAIR DESIGNING
715 N. University

I

I

FANS RIPE FOR MAJORS:
Big League Baseball on Pacific Coast Termed Feasible

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the final
of a series of articles concerned with
the possibility of establishing major
league baseball on the West Coast.)
By BILL STONE
When the discussion of the West
Coast as a potential battleground
for Big League baseball reaches
the action stage, the topic of f a-
ciluties available for such a project
must be covered in an objective
fashion.
The principal arguement in fa-
vor of extending the big time to
California from the facility stand-
point, is actually one of nature and
not metal and concrete. PCL sup-
porters claim that the weather in
California is just right for base-
ball.
THE CONSISTENTLY mild cli-
mate, according to many Cali-
fornians, would shorten the list
of postponements, and lengthen
the playing careers of many ath-
letes. Tommy Bridges, Max West,
and Bill Shuster are just a few
of the former big league stars who'
continued at a decent playing level
in the PCL, after they concluded
their respective major league ca-
reers.
Roy Corliss of the Palm
Springs California Chamber of
Commerce is of the opinion that
excluding the damp night air
of San Francisco and Oakland,
California weather is perfect for
day or night games.

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Running a classified ad
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Timely customers and
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v

As far as the player is concern-
ed, Pacific Coast air is like vita-
mins before breakfast. However
when off the track of weather, and
on the subject of ball park capa-
city, the'advocates of major league
ball on the west coast run into
their paramount opposition.
Outside of Los Angeles' Wrigley
Field, there isn't a park on the
coast that has the size to house
'M' Officers
Andy Kaul was named as the
new president of the "M" Club#
last night at Yost Fieldhouse.
Kaul, captain-elect of the
wrestling squad will be assisted
by vice-president Danny Cline
of the baseball and football
teams, secretary Pete Dow, and
treasurer Fred Bahr.
major league crowds. Even the LA!
park, which is flirting with the
thirty thousand mark, may not be
large enough.
The San Francisco Seals, and
the Oakland Acorns have been
thinking of re-building their re-
spective stadiums to meet major
league specifications. However
this will be done only if there
is a definite indication that the
big time is seriously considering
setting up one or two additional
clubs on the West Coast.

One plan that has been submit-
ted deals with using mammoth
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum as
a major league ball park. It would
take some minor revision of the
great sports palace, such a moving
some of the stands closer to the
playing field, to convert the big
bowl into an outstanding place for
a ball game.
ANOTHER BLOCK in the way
of the ambitions of the West Coast
is the question of transportation.
Many baseball players have super-
stitions against flying. Unless a
third major league were to be or-
ganized, travel would have to be
restricted to air.
Some big league teams have a
club policy against traveling by
plane, so this transportation ele-
ment takes on unusual impor-
tance. However most coast writ-
ers feel that these clubs are in
the minority and would consent
to flying if a big time team were
zet up on the coast.
We have now reviewed all angles
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Philadelphia 3, Cleveland 2 (night)
Chicago 8, Washington 6( night)
* * *
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh I (night)
Philadelphia 14, St. Louis 10 (Night-
11 innings)

of the hypothesis of having major
league baseball on the Pacific
Coast. After viewing the situation
first hand, there can be no other
conclusion but this one. From an
economic, and material position,
big league baseball cannot miss;
being a rousing success in Cali-
fornia. The fans are ready to out-
shine even Milwaukee in ticket
sales.
With all that money floating
around in Los Angeles and other
coast cities, the Big League mag-
nates are a cinch to migrate to
the Pacific, and like the famousI
explorer Balboa, they'll discover
that California is a pretty decent!
place.
"MR. FORMAL"
GUARANTEED
EVERYTHING
BUT A DATE WITH
1HIS FAVORITE
ACTRESS
A Hollywood screen test .. .
500 bucks worth of govern-
ment bonds . . . a complete
summer formal outfit by
"After Six" . . . A Ronson
lighter. . . A Kaywoodie pipe
and a set of Pioneer formal ac-
cessories . . . everything but a
date with his favorite actress,
and entries ,in the "MR. FOR-
MAL" contest are still coming
in. So far, 18 candidates: Bob
Kany, Tom Conlin, Rod Ef-
finger, Paul Hubbell, Steve
Hill, Dick Radway, Bob Thor-
son, Tom Sexworth, Bob
Pehlke, Stan Levenson, John
Olson, Dug Monro, Dean
Sabiston, John Farkas, Dean
Morley, Fred Walker, Frank
Gregory, Jim Rowland have
been nominated by their or-
ganizations for "MR. FOR-
MAL" at the University of
Michigan. There is still time
for your organization to enter
the contest if they have not
already done so. Simply call
Dick Alstrom at the MICHI-
GAN DAILY, NO 23-24-1
or come to Wild's on Wed-
nesday, May 5, or Saffell and
Bush on Thursday, May 6, be-
tween 3 and 5 p.m. to have

Phone Flint
Collect 4-168
For Lower
Interstate Rats

12.73Brodway
Flint, Michigan#
6
tes.

Bill
Stevens
Lit. '40
Manager

We own, operate and schedule our own fleet of vans
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..............."

W..hat makes
a Lucky
to. ste better?

": "i!

* . * * .r

ji

Sdmmm

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to taste better!'

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your picture
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taken in an
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jacket.
SAFFELL & BUSH
WAGNER & CO.
WILU & Co.
JUDGES for the local con-
test are going to pick the win-
ner Thursday, May 6, and
"MR. FORMAL" will be an-
nounced at IFC Ball Friday
night. "MR. FORMAL" will
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S7R i{ -xi
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