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May 04, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-04

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TUESDAY, MAY 4, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, MAY 4, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

scoreboard
. ..by alan eisenberg
It has been said, by baseball experts and fans alike, that if Stan
Musial could bat above .300 for the first two months of the season,
he would have practically no trouble in winning the National League
hitting crown and might threaten the coveted and almost unattain-
able .400 batting average.
This theory became popular when the national pastime followers
noticed that Musial would hover around the .200 mark for the first
third of the season. After that, the fans noted, the St. Louis Cardi-
nal outfielder would 'go on a batting spree, hit close to .400 for theI
rest of the campaign, and usually cop the batting crown.
The man with the crouching unorthodox batting stance had 4
one of the greatest days in his spectacular baseball career on.
Sunday against the New York Giants. Musial blasted five home
runs, breaking one record and tying another, as the Cards split
a twin bill with the Polo Ground crew. The veteran outfielder's
prolific output gave him a total of eight home runs and the league
in that department.
While on the subject of the Cardinals one other factor must be;
noted if an adequate explanation as to why the Red Birds, are at the
moment, 12 game out of first place.
And that is the high stolen-base ---
total for the Stanky men.
* * *
IT ALL started this Spring,
when Manager Eddie Stanky,
alarmed at the inability of his
charges to pilfer bases, offered a
suit of clothes for any and all of
his players who stole 10 sacks dur-
ing the season. At this early date
in the season the Red Birds have
come close to equalizing their 1953
output of 18 stolen bases.
Two of the biggest surprises in
this infant campaign has been
the inability of the world cham-
pions New York Yankees and
the Boston Red Sox to play ballf
as pennant contenders should,
At the moment the Yankees are STAN MUSIAL
lodged in fifth place two games
below the .500 mark, while the Red Sox are in the cellar 5 games
behind the league-leading Chicago White Sox.
Much of the blame for the ineptness of the Bosox must be placed!
on the killer of many teams, the injury jinx. Two of the Red Sox
stars, men who were to make them a tough club to beat, are out of the
lineup indefinitely. They are Ted Williams, who suffered a bone break
10 minutes after spring practice had begun, and Mel Parnell, out with
a fractured bone on his pitching arm.
LOU BOUDREAU, manager of the Boston team, had high hopes
that his club would be in the thick of the pennant race this year. But
with the misfortunes that his club has suffered in the first two weeks,
the Bosox' flag chances have been reduced considerably.
Casey Stengal is equally worried about the chances of his
team, the New York Yankees, to repeat for a sixth consecutive
year. Growling about the inefficicies of his infield the "Old Pro-j
i fessor" has promised some changes unless things perk up. He has
been experimenting with rookie Bill Skowron at third and may
insert him at the "hot corner" any day.
A combination of youth and age have jelled well for the Detroit
Tigers so far this year. Rookie outfielder Bill Tuttle, batting a re-
sounding .405 is presently leading the junior circuit in hitting, while
veteran Steve Gromek is the league's top pitcher, with four victories
and no losses. Harvey Kuenn, in his sophomore season in the Ameri-
can League, has thrown off an early season batting slump and has
risen to the .300 mark.

To Meet Irish Golf Scor
Intricacies
On Diamond TodayExlid
Explained

eU

Netmen Meet Western Michigan Today

By DAVE GREY

lkR-AY BEE- ~ .l. ~ ~ B.BC U1..I LE-4~t V ULZB k-3 "I'4-i J ' 901111
In. Warm-Vp Prior to Northern Trip

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By STEVE HEILPE
4Wolverine Golfers Defe
24'/f-liW"'z
While this headline wo
tainly be pleasing to the A

After a successful weekend with
victories over Notre Dame and
Northwestern, Michigan's tennis
squad faces an undefeated West-
ern Michigan team this afternoon
RN at 2:30 on the Varsity tennis
at MSC.courts.
Last Friday saw the Wolverines
uld cer- rally to hand the Irish a 6-3 de-

By PHIL DOUGLIS
Michigan's league-leading Wol-
verines take a break from Con-
ference baseball action this after-
noon as they take on a rugged No-
tre Dame nine in an exhibition
tilt on Ferry Field at 3:30 this aft-
ernoon.
The Irish barely bowed to the
Wolverines' national championship
team last season by a close 3-2
score at South Bend.
* * *
JACK KLINE'S nine will un-
doubtedlyprove very troublesome
to Michigan, having won a. good
many of their early season games.
Michigan will start fireballing,
lefty Dick Peterjohn on the mound,
and will follow up later in the
game with senior Ralph Fagge.
There is also a chance the "big
three" of Jack Ritter, Jack Cor-
bett, and Marv Wisniewski may
get an inning workout apiece.
The Wolverines are now on top
of the Big Ten standings with a
5-1 Conference record and a
15-4 overall season mark. Three
victories were added to the
Michigan scalp belt last weekend
as Ray Fisher's nine smashed
Purdue, 6-0, and' swept a twin
bill from Illinois, 6-I, and 3-2.
Michigan pitching was by far
the season's best last weekend, as
Jack Ritter whiffed 16 Purdue bat-
ters, Mary Wisniewski struck 10
Illini, and Jack Corbett chucked
a four-hitter against Illinois.
WHEN A TEAM allows only 14
hits and three runs in three Big
Ten games, its pitching certainly
is far from disappointing. Such is
Michigan's case, as the Wolverines
head into the stretch drive for
the Big Ten flag.
Hitting/also played a big part

in carrying the defending NCAA
champs to the top of the confer-
ence. The big bats of Don Ead-
dy, Dick Leach, Paul Lepley and
Tony Branoff boomed homeruns
over the weekend, while Eaddy
and Lepley also contributed sub-
stantially to their batting aver-
ages. Eaddy netted five hits in
eight trips while Lepley bangedj
out four hits in six trips to pace
the Wolverines at the plate.
This Friday, Michigan moves to'
the Northland, where they meet
ace nemesis Paul Giel and the
Minnesota Gophers. On Saturday
There will be an important{
meeting tonight of the 'M' Club
at 7:30 in Yost Fieldhouse. New
officers will be elected for the
coming year.
-Gene Knutson
the Maize and Blue move on to
Iowa City, to meet the rugged;
Hawkeyes of Iowa, in a twin bill.
Iowa derailed the pennant bound
Wolverine express twice last sea-
son.
In all probability, Ritter will face
Giel at Minneapolis on Friday,j
while Corbett and Wisniewski take
on the Hawks on Saturday. This!
will be the last extended road trip
of the season for the Wolverines.
BIG TEN STANDINGS

Michigan1

sports enthusiast, the chances are
that the score mentioned would'
leave him mystified. Since the cur-
rent links season is in full swing,
it might be helpful to the reader
if some explanation of the scoring
system now used were included in
these pages.
TO BEGIN WITH, the total
number of strokes (medal play)I
is always used in Michigan's
matches, Big Ten or otherwise.1
Under the system a player may
contribute a maximum of three
points to his team's total in an
18-hole ,round.
If a Wolverine golfer were
leading his opponent in strokes
at the end of the first nine holes,
he would pick up one point. If
they both finish with the same
score they receive one half point
each.
The same procedure is adhered4
to for the second nine. In addi-
tion, another' point is awarded theI
player holding the edge for the
total 18 holes. Again, one half
point is given to each in case of a
deadlock.
IT SHOULD be noted at this
point that a one-stroke edge en-
joyed by an individual golfer holds
as much importance in the team
scoring totals as a five-stroke lead.
Six players from each team
participate. The first-ranking
players of each team vie against
each other, but play in a four-
some with the number two golf-
ers. The same holds true for the
other two foursomes.
A team can garner a maximum
of 1.8 points for the 18 holes if
all its players sweep each nine
hole round. However, all Big Ten
matches now consist of 36 holes,
hence the present maximum of 36.

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feat on the South Bend courts.
Two of the losses came in the first
and second singles matches when -
captain Al Mann, who had just
been excused from the University!
Health Service the night before,
lost to Notre tame star Wally;
Clark, 3-6, 6-3, 6-0. Number two
man, Pete Paulus, bowed before!
Maury Reidy, 6-3. 1-6, 6-1.
THE REST of the squad faired
better, however, with the "Bob
quartet" of Bob Paley, Bob Neder-
lander, Bob Mitchell. and Bob
Sassone taking their singles
matches easily in straight sets.
tIn the doubles matches Clark
and Reidy edged Paulus and
Paley as the number one combi-
nation, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, but Mann
and Nederlander fought back to
clinch the match with a 6-3,
5-7, 6-3 win over the Irish num-
ber two doubles team. Mitchell
and Sassone "put the iceing on
the cake" with a final victory,
7-5 and 6-3 over the opponent's
number four and six netters,
Chuck Gallagher and John.
Stuldreher.
On Saturday, Michigan laced
into Northwestern to gain an easy
7-2 triumph at Evanston. Al Mann

again ran into some stiff competi-
tion this time losing to Al Kuhn.
6-4, 6-2. In gruelling matches,
Pete Paulus outlasted Wildcatter
Paul Bennent, 8-6, 3-6, and 6-1,
while Bob Paley whipped Gerry
Stager by a 6-3, 3-6, 6-1 count.
Nederlander, Mitchell, and Sas-
Buttlletin,
The University of Indiana
turned back the University of
Michigan golf team, 20-16, yes-
terday, on the Hoosier's home
course.
The Wolverines' record in Big
Ten play now stands at 2-5,
with a 3-7 overall mark.
The result of the meet came
as a surprise to many of the
Maize and Blue golf fans as
Michigan had previously beat-
en the Hoosiers in a quadrang-
ular meet with Purdue and Ohio
State.

possessing depth rather than
outstanding individual stars.
Number one man for Western is
Ed Foster, a 6' 1", 20-year old jun-
ior from Niles, Michigan, who with
returning letterman and number
three man, Jack Vredevelt, will
also make up the number two
doubles team. Jim Farrell from
St. Augustine High in"Kalamazoo
will play second singles and com-
bine with sophomore Charles Don-
nelly in the number one doubles.
Vern Johnson and either George
Carpenter or Max Allen will round
out the squad in singles play,
while Johnson and Carpenter, Al-
len, or Dick Norton will face Mich-
igan's Mitchell and Sassone in
doubles.
I-M SCORES
HORSESHOE PITCHING
Lambda Chi Alpha 2, Delta Tau
Delta 1

sone continued to impress Coach
Bill Murphy, taking the fourth,
fifth, and sixth singles.
THE ONLY other 'M' loss came
when Paulus and Paley dropped
their doubles match to Stager andj
John Clendenin. Mann and Ned- -
erlander had to rally to nip sopho-
mores Kuhn and Bennent, 5-7,
6-3, 6-2, but Mitchell and Sas-
sone had it easy as they completely
aced their opposition, 6-0 and 6-0.
Today's match with Western
Michigan is a contest between
two well-balanced teams, both

WATER POLO
Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, Sigma Al-
pha Mu 0

READV
AND
USE

CLASS I FIEDS
DAILY

MICHIGAN....
Michigan State .
Ohio State,......
Minnesota ......
Iowa ........,..
Northwestern ..
Wisconsin .....
Purdue........
Illinois.......
Indiana........

W
5
.3
4
4
3
2
2
2
0

L
1
1
2
2
2
4
5
4

Pet.
.833
.750
.667
.667
.500
.500
.500
.333
.167
.000

I-M SOFTBALL RESULTS:
Greene House Crushes Williams, 16-0

i9
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is n aclass by itself
It's as simple as this! Raleigh is the true royalty of English bicycles)
Uphill or down, whether you're rushing to class, or simply joyrding,
you'll really get around on your Raleigh. And Raleigh's sleek lines
and traditional English craftsmanship make it the royalty of th.
j campus tool
Look at these Raleigh specials)
e Sturmey-Archer 3-speed gear # lightweight and easy-to-handle
J " sleek, streamlined construction " practical hand brakes
It's smart to ride a Raleigh, the royalty of English bicycles-Raleigh-
in a class by itselfI
See your local dealer or write for more miformation.

Your telegram
on Mother's Day
y.
says all the things
you want to say

Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

W L
Chicago ....12 6
Detroit ......9 5
Cleveland .. .9 6
Philadelphia .8 7
New York .....7 9
Washington .6 9
Baltimore ....5 9
Boston.......4 9

Pct.
.667
.643
.600
.533
.438
.400
.357
.308

GB
1
1% 4
2%
4%
5
51- i

NATIONAL LEAGUE

W
Philadelphia .9
St. Louis ....10
Brooklyn ....9
Cincinnati ..10
New York ....9
Chicago .....6
Pittsburgh ...7
Milwaukee ...5

L
6
7
7
8
9
7
12
9

Pct.
.600
.588
.563
.556
.500
.462
.368
.357

GB
-
1.4
2
4
3%

f
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J
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By SOL ROSEN
Behind the masterful hurling of
Frank Balle, Greene House had no
trouble in drubbing Williams
House, 16-0, in a men's residence
halls I-M softball game yesterday
at Ferry Field.
Balle allowed only one hit and
one walk to the West Quad squad
and struck out 12 of the 15 bat-
ters thathe faced in his five-inn-
ing stint. The winners pushed
across eight tallies in the last
frame on five hits and seven walks.
* *
TAYLOR HOUSE and Wenley
House played a 0-0 tie, as Bob De-
lude, Wenley hurler, tossed a one-
hitter and Doug Lootens, Taylor
chucker, permitted only two safe-
ties. Delude struck out nine bat-
ters, and was never in trouble. The
Wenley team produced only one
scoring threat against the slants
of Lootens, when it loaded the
bases in the third with none out.
However, Lootens struck out the
next three batters, and was never
threatened again.
Gomberg House scored three
quick tallies in the initial frame,
and was never headed, as it de-
feated Scott House, 11-0. Lew
Meygesi, who hit a two-run
homer, and Bob Gardner, who
clouted a solo homer, were the
offensive stars for Gomberg. Bob
Mann received credit for the
win.
A seven-run second inning broke
open a close game and Michigan
House went on to defeat Cooley
House, 12-4. Jim Kmekaa's grand
slam home-run was the big blow
in that frame. Byron Sabin, win-
ning pitcher, allowed only six
hits and permitted the East Quad-
ers to tally in the late innings.
IN OTHER residence hall games,

Special to The Daily
MADISON - Minnesota's bowl-
ing squad replaced Purdue as Big
Ten champions here Saturday aft-
ernoon as the five man team roll-
ed 2675 tor three games to win the
annual tournament held this year
at the Wisconsin Union.

The doubles title went to Don
Siegan and Ray Sittig of Michi-
gan State who bowled a com-
bined total of 1111. Siegan was
the pacemaker for the winning
duo with a three game total of
637 to go along with his team-

Winchell House washdefeated by
Hayden House by the count of
9-5. John Potter hit a three-run
homer for the winners, and Gary
Boe was credited with the win. Van'
Tyne and Adams House battled to
a 2-2 deadlock. Bob Ollier's sin-
gle in the first inning gave Van
Tyne its two markers. Chuck Ca-
sey, Adams Hurler, struck out 1
eight batters and worked his wayl
out of numerous jams.+
Anderson House capitalized on7
six errors made by the Strausst
House infield in the third inn-

ing and tallied four times to win
8-1. Gil Lovey, winning hurler,
was tagged for only three hits
by the losers.
The Law Club rallied for 12 runs
in the first inning, and defeated
Alpha Kappa Psi, 18-5, in a pro-
fessional fraternity softball game.
Faculty of the Astronomy De-
partment defeated the Pschology
Department's "A" team by an 11-4
count, while WRRC defeated the
Physics department 11-5. Pschol-
ogy "B" defeated the Zoology De-
partment 5-2.

Minnesota Bowlers Capture
Big Ten Crown; 'M' Fourth

A .-
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Michigan's delegation, consisting mates' mediocre series.I
of Chuck Barnhart, Nonny Wein- Winner of the jall-vents trophy
stock, Hanley Gurwin, Gene Dutil for the best combined scores in
and Mickey Lewiston, finished doubles, singles, and team play was
fourth in the team event behind also Purdue's O'Hara, who threw
Michigan State, and Illinois. 1738 to become a double winner.
BARNHART finished third in At the banquet following the
the singles event with a 554 while tournament, it was announced that
Gurwin held down fifth place with next year's tournament, sponsored
548. John O'Hara of Purdue won annually by the Unions of the Big
the singles crown with an excep- Ten schools, would be held at the
tionally fine total of 633. University of Indiana.

514 E. William

Call NO 2-0035

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It's Crew Cut Tuner-*.
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our Specialty
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WHO WILL BE
AT UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

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in such a warm
and loving way

Whatever else you do,
send her a telegram, too.
ck.,a' wis

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