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April 22, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-04-22

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T" iT RSDAY, APM It 1934

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAGE THREE

~11TUUSDAY, APRIL 12, 1254 TEE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

CLINIC TRAINING OFFERED:
Fresh Air Camp Seeks Counselors

by JANE HOWARD
Help urgently needed-by the'
240 boys, between seven and four-
teen years old, who'll occupy the
University's Fresh Air Camp this
summer. ,
On June 21 fifty selected gradu-
ate students in psychology, socio-
logy. education, social work and
physical education will begin eight
weeks of intensive clinical train-
ing with the boys as counselors
for the camp Summer Session.
LOCATED twenty-four miles
west of Ann Arbor, the camp is
directed by Edward J. Slezak and
is a part of the University's Insti-
tute for Human Relations. Its ex-
penses are met jointly by Univer-
sity funds and the camp's support-
ing social agencies.
It is these agencies who refer
the names of campers, of whom
240 are chosen for the two
month-long sessions. Nearly all
of them, according to Slezak,
"have already developed symp-
toms of maladjustment, some-
times severe and deeply rooted."
Some come from institutional
homes, while others, also pro-
ducts of unfortunate environ-
ments, have records of delin-
queficy.
The fifty counselors selected
will be regularly .enrolled in tl..
University's Summer Session, pay-
ing customary tuition fees. From
the camp they'll receive room,j
board and a small salary.
Eligible to apply for admission
to the summer program are Uni-
versity graduate studentsrseniors
here or. at other institutions whok
want this kind of experience and1
former counselors. Those selected
may choose from among four
categories of work.

Advisors
A meeting of all of those
who have been contacted to
serve as student counselors for
next week will be held at 4
p.m. today in Rm. 1025 Angell
Hall.
Dean James H. Robertson of
the literary college, and Arthur
Van Duren, chairman of liter-
ary college faculty counselors
for Freshmen and Sophomores
will meet with the student ad-
visors.
Reisman Tells
Survey Data
On Middle Agre
"Planning Research on Our Ag-
ing Population" was the subject
of a lecture by Prof. David Reis-
man of Chicago University, yester-
day, sponsored by the sociology
department.
Using survey findings of middle
age attitudes conducted by Chi-
cago University in Kansas City as
the basis of his talk, Prof. Reisman
discussed some of the problems
confronted and results , of that
study.
* * *
"WHILE TV is the greatest ri-
val and a problem for interview-
ers," said Prof. Reisman, "it is of
tremendous importance to older
people. It is the baby sitter for
Grandma."
There is an unusual empha-
sis on family ties in Kansas City,
Prof. Reisman said the survey
of people over 4 years of ago
revealed.

Students
.Of P

Learn Facts

'lay

HELP FOR THE MALADJUSTED-Studies, field work and vaca-
tion ale combined at the Fresh Air Camp for student counselors
who guide 240 boys, nearly all "problem children," through two
months' camping experience under individual and group super-
vision.

TUSSY
CREAM DEODORANT*
big $1 jar...
now only
plus tax

CABIN COUNSELORS, the first
classification, each have charge
over eight boys, supervising their
individual and group activities
from the vantage point of actually
living with them. They keep ex-
tensive records on each camper's
progress, which are later referred
back to the agencies recommend-
ing the boys.
Through particular mediums
such as art, nature study, sport,
dramatics or music, the special-
ized counslors deal in the sum-
mer's course with nearly all the
campers, giving them assistance
in their interest fields.
Case workers, from the School
of Social Work, are assigned to in-
dividual campers whose problems
have not been solved by group
therapy. Students in this category
interview the children regularly.
Other counselors are accepted
for work as psychology or educa-
tion interns a n d are offered
further supervised experience in
helping campers with their emo-
tional problems or by remedial
tutoring.
ALTHOUGH the Fresh Air
Camp work is strenuous, demand-
ing careful scheduling, students
are given a day and a half off
every week as well as extra time
for personal interests.
Each week a major social
event for the entire staff is
planned, usually centering a-
round the lakes near the camp,
which offer opportunities for
water sports. Occasional trips
to the University campus are
arranged.
Male counselors share cabins
with the campers, and women are
housed in separate dormitories.
"Nobody," Sleazk said, "is ex-
pected to reform the children or
to effect any dramatic changes,
but they all must be tireless in

their efforts to build a program
which serves the needs of the
boys."
Applicants for this summer work
should write immediately for in-
formation to Edward J. Slezak,
Fresh Air Camp Director, 504D
University Elementary School, Ann
Arbor.

Survey Reveals No Decline
In Employment for Graduates.

roduc tion
re is a saying that goes: "Everyone at one time or another
o be on the stage or in the movies."
ients in the University speech department have the opportu-
not only acting in a play, but of learning behind-the-scenes
zch as costuming, directing, and set designing. Effective prep-
for a performance is a must for a successful production.
E FIRST STEP in play production is taken by directing speech
ient classes. Here the different possibilities of plays that may
n are discussed. The student learns that the final selection
e adaptable to the accommodations available for its produc-
L variety of scripts must be used and the one chosen should
with the well-rounded program the department is striving
'he number of people who will be available for parts in the
.ction is tallied and this also may affect the final selection
e play.
er careful consideration of these factors, the play is finallr
. Immediately try-outs are held not only for acting parts
costuming and set designing crews as well. This backstage
an important and vital part of the final production.
RING TRY-OUTS juggling of parts takes place to obtain the
vorable results. The final cast is announced, and the costumers
designers begin concentrated work.
'he actors first read their scripts to get a general idea of
part in the play. The director blocks out the stage action
discusses each actor's motivation while on stage with him.
enables him to know just where he is supposed to be at every
ant during the production.
es are memorized and the actors are fitted for their costumes.
stumers have worked to. make the costumes as authentic as
. They must also be in keeping with the atmosphere of the
* be easy for the actors to move around in.
* * * *
E ACTORS MUST also get used to the scenery and the lighting
n stage. Scene designers work to produce settings that fit the
theme of the play and coose their
colors to blend with those of the
costumes.
First rehearsals are held in
Temporary Classroom Building,
.'- but about a week before the pro-
duction the cast moves into Ly-
' dia Mendelssohn Theater where
the performances are held.
Final polishing is done on the
play, costumes, and set in the dress
' rehearsals which are held to per-
fect the performance.
The production is now ready for
opening night to show the results
of weeks of rehearsals, costume-
making, and set construction to
the public.
The Speech department has
f: sponsored "Ariadne of Naxos"
"Taming of the Shrew" and a La
boratory Bill Including Aristo-
phenes' "The Frogs," Rupert
Brook's "Lithuania," and "The
k Tenor" by Frank Wedekind.
The current production is Eu-
gene Hochman's 1953 Hopwood
award winning play, "Veranda
Tickets are on sale at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Box Office at $1.20-
90c-60c with a special student rate
of 50c in effect opening night.

LINES MUST BE MEMORIZED

Business recessions are not be-
ing reflected in the demand for
graduates of the nation's profes-
sional schools, according to a re-
cent United Press survey.
Polling campus placement bu-
reaus at 12 schools across the
country from Stanford to Harvard;
the survey found no decline in total
placements and a rise of five to
ten per cent in starting business
salaries since last year.
. * .*
AT ONE university, the young
scientist with a bachelor's degree
can now expect a salary of $320 a
month compared to $300 of, a year
ago. A master's degree in the tech-
nical fields is drawing $420 a
month to start as against $397 of
last year.
Graduates with engineering
degrees are in great demand,
with Georgia Tech, an engineer-
ing college, reporting that all its
450 graduates will have jobs by
commencement time. Prospec-
tive teachers are also reported to
be finding jobs without difficul-
ty. Positions are scarce, however,
for college instructors.
TECHNICAL graduates with a
PhD can usually get the most at-
tractive salaries, ranging around
$600 a month. The holder of an
M.S. can draw up to $450, but sal-
aries drop to $300 and $400 for
M.A. degrees.
The college graduate with a
Final Law Debates
Scheduled Today
Highlighting the year in the
Law School, Case Club will prV-
sent the final oral arguments of
the Henry M. Campbell Compe-
tition at 2 p.m. today in Rm. 100
Hutchins Hall.
Four Law School juniors reach-
ing the finals after two years of
practice and elimination are Rich-
ard C. Hostetler and W. Gerald
Warren representing the petition-
ers and Davis M. Roach and Don-
ald G. Black who will defend the
respondent.

B.A. will usually find that his
degree is worth $250 to $350
a month, the survey reports, but
the B.S. graduate averages $400.
* * *
AT HARVARD, government jobs
stood at the bottom of employer
lists, according to Louis Newby,
assistant director of placements
there. Less Harvard men are seek-
ing government employment and
the government has made fewer
requests, he reported.
In the job opportunity for
women, the survey indicates that
many women college graduates
could attract salaries no greater
than $45 a week. Barnard Col-
lege, however, listed good pros-
pects for its graduates. All
schools stated that graduates
were doing less "shopping
around" for jobs and accepting
first offers.
* * *
WELLESLEY COLLEGE esti-
mates that 70 per cent of its 1954
graduating class, composed of 375
women, will go to work. Out of
this number, "practically all" were
finding jobs. Columbia said that
it had more jobs listed for stu-
dents this year than ever before.
Student Potentials
Aired by Anspach
"Professors are continually
searching for the student who
shows future promise," stated
Charles L. Anspach, president of
Central Michigan College, at the
speech assembly yesterday at 4
p.m. in Rackham Lecture Hall.
Anspach's topic was "Pearls of
Great Price" which he related to
the individual. He listed the three
essential characteristics of a
promising student as: A creative
mind, a wholesome personality,
and energising faith.
The speaker said that the source
of wealth of the individual is the
mind and that this mind must be
a live, inquisitive, and sensitive
mind. A person's personality
should include adaptability, con-
sideration for others, and coop-
eration.

THE SET DESIGNER STUDIES A MODEL SET

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On the Campus
Students from the Speech 32
classes will take part in a public
speaking demonstration today at
4 p.m. in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.
* * *
Newly elected officers for the
School of Business Administration,
class of '55, are: David Kennedy,
president; Don Chisholm, vice-
,president; Connie Hilton, secretary
and Majorie Price, treasurer.
Because the Michifish swim-
iers will not use the women's
pool today, any woman student
may swim from.7:30 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. today.

CALKINS-
FLETCHER
324 S. State
818 S. State

COSTUMERS WORK AS HARD AS THE ACTORS INSTRUCTOR OBSERVES PLAY REHEARSAL

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DIAMOND

The Ann Arbor Art Association
:Announces~
AN EXHIBITION
OF PHOTOGRAPHY
Ma y 5-19, 1954
RACKHAM GALLERIES
ANN ARBOR

DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Story by
Gail Goldstein

WEDDING SET
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