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February 12, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-12

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THIMEE

I _____ I

P AGE TH!iitEE V

- ,

MODERN CONCEPT:

Read Explains Art Conflict

A

The basis for today's conflict in
art comes from a difference in
moral sensibility and aesthetic
values Sir Herbert Read declared
in yesterday's English department
lecture.
Speaking on "The Fundamental
Conflict in Modern Art before a
standing - room - only audience,
Read gave some differences as to
what morals and aesthetics are
based on: aesthetics on intuition
and moral-values on sentiment;
aesthetics on truth, morals on the
good; aesthetics as a way of life,
morals as a particular way of life.
** *
"ART NEVER changes under
aesthetics," Sir Herbert continued,
"while art does change under mor-
als. And art seeks to define all
values."
The eminent essayist and crit-
ic, remarking on Tolstoy's views
of all art and artists expressed
his inability to believe Tolstoy's
opinion that art can establish a .
brotherhood of man. "Art begins
with states of feeling and gives
them concrete reality, material-
izes them. This is the opposite of
Tolstoy's statements.
"Love has given rise to the
greatest works of art. But Tolstoy
would say that some of it is bad,
a sign of a decadent society. But
is Sappho a bad poet, or Proust a
bad novelist? Tolstoy would think
so."
Speaking on art and politics
Sir Herbert said "All works of
art are doomed to be weapons in
the social system, art becomes
not only a propaganda instru-
ment but a social function for
the ideology."
Sir Herbert warned against
making modern art conform for
this would be ignoring "all tech-
niques which have made the mod-
ern world possible. Great art pro-
ceeds from fundamental charac-
teristics of human nature. It is
neither the art nor the people that
is wrong, but the civilization..
"Art Can change the chemical
forces of the world, the physi-
cal, material entities. Spiritual
changes will follow."

SL Films
Features on the Student Leg-
islature-Cinema Guild screen
this weekend include "The
Mudlark" at 7 and 9 p.m. today
and "It Happened One Night"
at 7 and 9 p.m. tomorrow and
8 p.m. Sunday in Architecture
Auditorium.
Irene Dunn and Alec Guin-
ness will play in the film set
in Queen Victoria's England.
Claudette Colbert and Clark
Gable will star in the second
movie selection.
Admission is 50 cents.
Law Institute
To Convene 1
At Rackhan
Prominent American trial law-
yers will address the fifth annual
Institute on Advocacy program
sponsored by the Law School with
the cooperation of the Michigan
Law Institute today and tomorrow
in the Rackham Bldg.
Beginning with registration at
noon today the program will in-
struct an expected assembly of 600
lawyers on important aspects of
the office side of trial practice and
on principles of court-room argu-
ment.
Included in the program arrang-
ed by Prof. Charles W. Joiner of
the Law School are Werner W.
Schroeder of Chicago, Clifford W.
Gardner of St. Paul, Minnesota,
Judge James R. Breakey, Jr. of
Michigan's 22nd Judicial Circuit,

108,000 tOO MANY:
Survey Shows State
Schools Overcrowded
By FREDDI LOEWENBERG
BygFREDD s L ErENBer Another survey also recently re-
Michigan's schools are ove - leased notes salary conditions in
crowded by approximately 108,000 the state for the 1952-53 school
students at present, according to e The median salary fo
a shoo failiiessurey elesedyear. The median salary for the
a school facilities survey released state's teachers falls in the range
this week. between $2,500 and $2,600, with
The survey, conducted in 1952 Wayne county paying its "middle"
by the Michigan Department of tec o t$3,200.
Public Instruction for the State teAlhoughelosaa$e, are. o
Legislature, points out substand- Although low salaries are not
ard santiary conditions, obsolete limited to any one section of the
facilities and construction data in state, on the whole, rural teachers
the state's nearly 5,000 school dis- in the southeastern and central
tricts. parts of the state drew larger sal-
aries than their colleagues in the
AC(RDITNG t r;north.

ml

SIR HERBERT READ
.. "the civilization is wrong"
ROBERT FLAHERTY:-
Noted Flm Producers
Life Reviewed b Critic

uunjui~a Vto the survey, it
will cost Michigan taxpayers
$400,000,000 to provide for essen-
tial new school construction and
improvements in existing plants.
The overcrowded classrooms
and obsolete facilities have
caused survey takers to recom-
mend that 935 school plants be
abandoned immediately. Crowd-
ing has been such that almost
50,000 students are attending
school on multiple session plans
or some other form of a shorten-
ed school day. Another 40,000
must learn their 3 R's in make-
shift or rented quarters.
Cited as potential fire-traps are
the 53 percent of the state's
schools constructed of combustible
materials. Out of these, 405 do
not meet minimum fire standards.
. STUDIES of one-room schools
find 64,000 students in attendance.
Almost 1,000 school districts have
closed their school buildings,
transporting their children to oth-
er districts.
Buildings are rapidly wearing
out, with 40 per cent of the
state's schools being built before
1900 with only 6.4 per cent con-
structed since 1945.
Noting poor sanitary conditions,
the survey says 1,206 schools have

G&S Society
ToAudition
Try-outs for the spring produc-
tion of the Gilbert and Sullivan
Society will be held today from
7 to 9 p.m. and Sunday, from 7 to
10 p.m. in the League.
The group is planning to present
two short operas: "Thespis" and
"The Sorcerer." "Thespis" was the
first fruit of the Gilbert and Sulli-
van collaboration and it was in
this work that the famous Gilbert
chorus came into being.
THE SCORE was not published
and there is only one song re-
maining from it.
Jerald Bilik, Spec., has written
and orchestrated the score for
the opera. Bilik, Michigan
Marching Band arranger, has
attempted to write the music as,
he feels Gilbert would have.
Bilik and Clarence Stephenson,
Grad., will direct the production
to be presented in Ann Arbor, April
15 to 17, and in Detroit April 23.

SRA Enjoys
Long History
On Campus
By CAROL NORTH
Celebrating its 97th anniversary
this year, the Student Religious
Association, formerly the Student
Christian Association, was the first
organization of its kind to be
formed in America.
Founded in the fall of 1857 on
the then all-male campus, SCA
(later SRA) was a coed organiza-
tion, with both female staff mem-
bers and faculty members' wives
forming the group until student
coeds arrived on campus.
IN THE PAST sixteen years
there has been a large development
in the conception -of a religious
program on campus. According to
Dewitt C. Baldwin, director of
Lane Hall, "We are getting away
from the idea of simply an inter-
religious organization on campus.
Lane Hall is the name of an inter-
religious program, which includes
both students and staff in its func-
tioning."
Lane Hall has often been con-
fused with SRA, while in actual-
ity, SRA is merely a part of the
over-all inter-faith program
that Lane Hall offers
Concerning itself with coordi-
nating student and professional
religious activities on campus,
sponsoring inter - religious pro-
grams, working on religious coun-
seling, and developing the relig-
ious perspective of the community
in respect to the state, nation and
world, Lane Hall is an important
part of campus life.
Through SRA, in conjunction
with Lane Hall, the student may
learn of the different types of re-
ligious faiths in the world today,
together with discovering new as-
pects of his own and other relig-
ions. ,

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)
Summer Employment. Camp Charle-
voix, Charlevoix. Michigan will have a
representative on campus Wednesday
and Thursday, Feb. 17 and 18 in inter-
view men for all types of counselor
positions common to a boy's camp.
Contact Bureau of Appointments, NOr-
mandy 3-1511. Extension 2614 to make
an appointment.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS-
Tuesday, Feb. 16:
Proctor & Gamble Co., of Cincinnati.
Ohio, will have representatives at thc
Bureau on Feb. 16 to talk with' men
June graduates, Bus. Ad. or LS&.
about positions in the.Buying andTra-
fic Departments or in the Comptrol-
ler's Division.
Tues. and Wed., Feb. 16 and 17:
United Air Lines, Chicago, Ill., wiP
interview June and August women
graduates in all fields on Feb. 16 anc,
17 for positions as Airlines Stewardesses.
Single women between the ages of 21
and 27 or those who will be 21 uo
graduation are eligible to schedulea--
pointments.
Wednesday, Feb. 17:
Pillsbury Mills, Inc., Minneapcis
Minn., will have a representative c
the campus on Feb. 17 to talk wi,
June men graduates in Bus. Ad.
LS&A about Management Tratni,
Programs in accounting, sales, procic-
tion, office management, advertisii
traffic, grain merchandising, econoni
research, and marketing research.
Students wishing to schedule 9p
pointments to see any of the compar
listed above may contact the Bure ,
of Appointments, 3528 Administration
Bldg., Ext. 371.
(Continued on Page 4)

"Robert Flaherty was the kind
of movie producer everyone met
who held an interest in films," ac-
cording to Saturday Review of Lit-
erature movie reviewer Arthur
Knight.
The reviewer explained noted
film man created his documen-
taries with the "intention of giv-
ing information." In order to find
out the traditions and manner of
living of a people, Kight pointed
out, Flaherty might live with them
for months before he started shoot-
ing a film.
S * *
KNIGHT serves on the advisory
board of the Flaherty Foundation,
a group founded after the produc-
er's death to encourage young
film-makers to follow the Flaher-
ty tradition.
A series of four of the late
movieman's films will be shown
Feb. 22 and 25 and March 1 and
3 during the Flaherty Film Fes-
tival.
Sponsored by the English de-
partment and the Gothic Film So-
ciety, the festival will include
"Nanook of the North," "Moana,"
"Man of Aran" and "Louisiana
Story."

KNOWN as "the father of the and Ralph M. Carson of New York
doc'umentary," Flaherty develop- City.
ed plots for his films from peopleCt
Knight said. He sought stories
conveying their traditions and'evelops
folklore, the reviewer noted. "If
Flaherty distorted the face of re-IA
ality, he did so to show the truth L
of the original people."
Flaherty spent much time just A microscope, utilizing radioac-
talking to the people of Samoa tive particles to determine the na-
before beginning production of ture of combinations of atoms in
"Moana." He discovered the living tissue or metal structures,
"ritual of the tattoo" symbolized has been developed by University
the character of native Samoans researchers.
and used it as key scene in the Major work on the project, spon-
film. * sored by the Atomic Energy Com-I
Pain connected with the process mission, was done by Prof. William
of tattooing tested the fibre of the Kerr of the engineering college as
people, according to Knight, since the subject of his doctoral thesis
there were no immediate problems 'which was under the supervision of
of survival involved in the South Prof. Henry J. Gomberg of the en-
Sea island paradise. gineering college, assistant direc-
tor of the Phoenix Project.
When reviewers criticized the

{

ions.

I

only outdoor toilet facilities with ANN ARBOR'S MOST LISTENED-TO
others having no sanitary facili-
ties at all. Several hundred have

0
ORCH ESTRA~2~

Read what the New York
papers say about the
new edition of

no fixed washing facilities.
GOP To H'ear
Walter Williams

5

THE STUDENT PLAYERS
present

I1

I

i

I

Feb. 17-20 -2 8 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater
227 S. Ingalls
NO 8-6300
Box Office opens Feb. 15
MAIL ORDERS NOW
Adm. $1.20 and 90c

FARMERS
PRODUCE
MARKET

SALES FROM FARMER
DIRECTLY TO CONSUMER
Open Every Saturday
8 A.M. to 3 P.M.
DETROIT STREET
between Catherine & Kingsley.

picture because some film scenes
did not depict life in the Samoa
of that day, Flaherty replied
that what the whites in the is-
lands had done was of no im-
portance.
The producer was telling the
story of Samoa and these scenes
were found in its folklore, even
though white influence had chas-
ed the customs out of the islands.
Civil Liberties
Lectures Planned
Prof. Wesley A. Mauer, chair-
man of the journalism depart-
ment, and Prof. Kenneth E. Boul-
ding of the economics department
are included among speakers who
will discuss "Present Threats to
Our Civil Liberties" at 8 p.m.,
Tuesday, in the Wesley Lounge of
the First Methodist Church.
Blackenburg Leads
County Democrats
New chairman of the Washte-
naw County Democratic Committee
is Viola B. Blackenburg of Ypsi-
lanti.
Mrs. Blackenburg succeeds Hen-
ry Owens as head of the county
group. Owens has announced his
candidacy for Congressman from
the Second District.

'Ensian Welcomes
Photographers
The 'Ensian offers opportunities
and experience to photographers
interested in joining the yearbook's
tryout staff.
Prospective 'Ensian photogra-
phers will meet at 4:15 p.m. today
in the conference room of the Stu-
dent Publications' Bldg.
The 'Ensian is beginning a new
system of shorter training for its
photography tryouts. Immediate;
job placement and advancement to
paying assignments will be given
as soon as tryouts have the requir-
ed ability.
Francis To Study
New Polio Vaccine
The National Foundation for In-
fantile Paralysis announced yes-
terday the appointment of Dr.
Thomas Francis, professor of the
epidemiology department, as head
of an evaluation study of a new
polio vaccine.
The vaccine will be given to over
a half million children in selected
parts of the nation. The evaluation
center will be set up at the Univer-
sity with the Survey Research
Center assisting in collection and
analyses of statistical data.

Undersecretary of Commerce
Walter Williams will be the fea-
tured speaker at Washtenaw
county's Lincoln Day dinner,
which will be held at 6 p.m. today
at the Union.
Want to travel
and study
abroad?
Take a university-sponsored
tour via TWA this summer
and earn full college credit
while you travel
Visit the countries of your choice
.. . study from 2 to 6 weeks at a
foreign university.-You can do both
on one trip when you arrange a uni-
versity-sponsored tour via TWA.
Itineraries include countries in
Europe, the Middle East, Asia and
Arica. Special study tours available.
Low all-inclusive prices with TWA's
economical Sky Tourist service.
For information, write: John H.
Furbay, Ph. D., Director, Air World
Tours, Dept. CN, 380 Madison Ave.;
New York 17, N. Y. Be sure to men-
tion countries you wish to visit.

The Rainbow Combo
Featuring V V! *

Members
and Guests only.
You must be 21.

lovely Mary Lou
HALL

RENTALS 8 BANQUETS_ _

-:.

When you eat out . *
ENJOY THE FINEST
in atmosphere
The Golden Apples
RESTAU RANT
Located in
THE TOWER HOTEL
(across from Burton Tower)
FULL COURSE SUNDAY DINNER
OUR SPECIALTY
(Phone NO 2-4531 for reservations)

r

CL1U II

H ERALD-RIBOE/ " . .dis.
tinctive and refreshing stylo."
W iRL E R ". . a
bang-up job."
IMESA"... written for pleas.
ant reading and easy learning,
and ably fulfills both aims."
0-"...the finestinvest.
ment in photographic instruction
around today."
Got your copy here. Mthly
COMPLETE
CAMERA SERVICE
'he 0rm ,9*1c.
320 S. State St.
NO 3-4121
Open Every Night to 9:30 P.M

STUDENTS!!
Enjoy fine food - excellent service
TAMERLANE TERRACE
Clinton's Outstanding Restaurant
Two blocks from stoplight
Closed Thursdays Phone 325F2
222 W. Michigan -- Clinton, Mich.

TRANS WORLD AlRLI'1

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THE (Uh' 1e4 t
VALENTINES
IN TOWN
also the most sentimental

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CHESTER ROBERTS
312 S. State St.

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