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March 28, 1954 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-28

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SUNDAY", MARCH 29, 1954

THE MICHIGA'! DAILY

1"AGI& TIV19

.S..N..A... .MA R C H. . ..2..... . .... ... ............................................

Panel Outlines Job Opportunities

U' Carnival

ROUND OF CONCERTS:

To Be Visited Music Organizations Plan

Group Notes
Wide Choice

0of

Careers

Job opportunities for women
with a liberal arts background
were outlined yesterday at the
League Career Conference by a
faculty panel made up of Prof.
Marvin Felheim of the English de-
partment, Prof. Otto Graf of the
language department, Prof. Edgar
Willis of the speech department,
Prof. Howard Ehrmann of the
history department and Miss Mil-
dred Webber of the Bureau of Oc-
cupation and Appointments.
Prof. Felheim, moderator of the
panel, opened the informal discus-
sion with a few general remarks,
and then guided the panel into a
discussion of opportunities in the
field of teaching.
* * *
SKETCHING briefly the var-
ious stages through which the
teaching of German has passed,'
Prof. Graf noted that prior tp
World War I, German was an im-
portant subject in both primary
and secondary schools, but that in
the post-war period, German al-
most disappeared from school cur-
ricula.
However, since World War II
there has been a resurgence of
interest in German, largely be-
cause of the strategic import-
ance of Germany in the world-
today. The prospects for sec-
ondary school teachers in this
field are good and the prospects
for elementary school teachers
are getting better.
Prof. Willis then mentioned
some of the opportunities for
Pool Schedule Set
For This Week
Women's swimming pool facili-
ties will be available to special
groups this week.
Michifish will practice from 2
to 4 p.m. tomorrow, 3 to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday and 4:15 to 5:30 p.m.
Thursday. The only women's rec-
reational swimming will take place
from 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. tomorrow.
The Michigan Marching Band
and TV staff have been invited to
use the pool from 7:30 to 9:30
p.m. tomorrow, while 4:15 to 5:0
p.m. Tuesday has been set aside
for the Dean of Women's staff, res-
idence hall directors and staffs,
sorority house heads and league
house heads.
Girl Scouts may swim ,from 4:15
to 5:30 Friday, and secretaries and
office staffs in the University are
invited from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
and Friday.

. --Daily-Dean Morton
CAREER GUIDANCE-Prof. Howard Ehrmann, Miss Mildred
Webber, Prof. Otto Graf, Prof. Marvin Felheim and Prof. Edgar
Willis open the first League Career Conference with a panel
discussion on "Value of Humanities in Regard to Earning a
Living."

By Governor
Dignitaries To Serve
As Judges of Booths,
Parade at Michigras
Hats tossed into the political
ring will be replaced by Michigras
April 23 and 24.
Current Secretary of State Owen
J. Cleary wrote the parade com-
mitee, "I'll be delighted to be a
judge for your parade, and you'
may be sure I am looking forward
to this occasion with a great deal
of pleasure."
GOVERNOR G. Mennen (Soapy)
Williams will arrive on campus at
11 a.m. Friday, April 23. He will
be greeted by Hal Abrams and
Gretchen Meier, general co-chair-
man, decked out in the Michigras
hat wich will invade campus soon,
and will be driven about town in
the Michigras car.
Serving as a patron and a
judge for the booths in the car-
nival, Governor Williams, who
visited the campus Wednesday,
said he was pleased to receive
an invitation to Michigras.
Two other dignitaries, Regent
Vera Baits, and Marshall Freder-
icksahead sculptor, at Cranbrook
art academy, Bloomfield Hills have
consented to serve as parade
judges.
Ju es ** *
LEADERS of six high school
bands have already indicated that
their groups will march in the
Michigras parade, Friday, April 23,
They are the Ann Arbor, Coldwa-
ter, Plymouth, Saline, South Field
and Chelsea High School Bands.
A special trophy will be
awarded to the best band in this
division. Making one of its rare
spring appearances, the Michi-
gan Marching Band under the
direction of Prof. William Revel-
li will lead the parade, which
will start out at the Farmers
Market, wind down Main to
Liberty, up Liberty to State,
and will then proceed down
State to Yost Field house.

'Three campus ui a tli.
the University Symph ony,,Band,
the Michigan Singersand the'.
Men's Glee Club. have s eduled
tours during spring vacation.
The 110-piece Symphony Band
will present eight concerts in five
Michigan cities.
'2 * *
UNDER the direction of William
D. Revelli, the band will give its
first concert on Thursday at Owos-
so. Other appearances will include
two performances Friday at Bay
City, two concerts on Saturday at
Muskegon, an afternoon perform-
ance on Sunday April 4 at Trav-
erse City, and two concerts on
Monday, April 5 at Midland.
Winning praise from band
conductors and composers such
as Edwin Frauko Goldman.
Henry Cowell, Leroy Anderson
and others, the band varies both
in instrumentation and person-
al from the Marching Band,
which performs during the foot-
ball season. Both men and wom-
en students are included in the
Symphony Hand, in contrast to
the all-male tradition maintain-,
ed by the March Band,
Michigan Singers, a 40-v oice

April 7 at Binghampton, April 8
SSenectady and April 9 at
Composed of Robert McGrath,
Constantin Ginakaris, Thomas'
Schill and Reid Wagstaff, the
Novelaires Quartet will be featured
during the tour.
The Club is composed of gradu-
ate and undergraduate members
from every c6llege in the Univers-
ity. Organized in 1859, it is the sec-
ond oldest college glee club in
America.

Tours for Spring Vacation

,

Suit"

I F4cp,4 Calnpu4

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FATHER RICHARD CENTER-
A Communion Breakfast will be
held after 9:30 a.m. Mass today
at the Father Richard Center.
Mrs. Justine Murphy, co-director
of the Catholic Worker Organiza-
tion of Detroit, will speak on "Ap-
plications of Christian Social Prin-
ciples.'
MICI NGRAS- There will be
a meeting for all the subehairman

COLLEGE SHOP
"I'd rather have a
LIFE SAVERS*

speech teachers, who are mostly in
correction work on the elementary
level and may also be called uppn
to do dramatic work with the chil-'

LCr

sure of their future plans as men
who have to decide early in life
what they will do to support them-
selves and a family,
4', * *
HE ALSO discussed the preju-

choral unit under the direction of of the Michigras ticket committee
Maynard Klein, will take to the at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow, in the
road for eight concerts in Ken- Michigras Office. Reports should
tucky, North Carolina and Tennes- be turned in at that time.
see,

dren.

* * *r
ON THE HIGH SCHOOL level,
speech is usually part of the Eng-
lish department and the speech
teacher will often teach some
courses in English, coach the de-
bating team and handle any speech
correction problems.
At this point in the discussion,
Miss Webber remarked that
there are always lots of oppor-
tunities for elementary school
teachers and that there is a
growing demand for high school
and college teachers in every
field.
* I
PROF. Ehrmann said that in the'
past 20 years there have been 13
Ph. D. degrees granted to women
at the University and that of
these 13, eight women are teaching
on the college level.
This point brought up the
question as to the relative de-
mand for men and women in
various fields, and why men are
often preferred to women.
On this question, Prof. Felheim
noted that although there b s
been a growing demand for women
in many fields, women themselves
often spoil their own chances. He
pointed out that many women
don't want to be taught by women'
and that many women aren't as

dices in some businesses againstj
women particularly in phases of
a job that requires a period of
training and apprenticeship. Oft-'
en women will start out in a job
and then get married and leave
before they have completed their
orientation to the work.
Looking into other career op-
portunities, Prof. Graf men-
tioned jobs available in the ex-
port businessbfor students with
training in business and lan-
guages, Ile also outlined the ca-
reers with government agencies
open for linguists, historians and
economists with proficiency in
a strategic language,
Winding up the conference, Prof,
Felheim stressed the need for peo-
ple with a broad cultural back-
ground and added that it was
"the general consensus of the pan-
el to congratulate you on being
women"
Pictures
Senior Night pictures will be
available until Saturday in the
Undergraduate Office of the
League. The price is 60 cents.

THIS IS the first out-of <aIe
tour made since the group was or--j
ganized in 1948, 20 women students
and 20 men make up the Singers'!
tour group.
Centre College on Friday in
Danville, Ky., will be the first
stopping place. Then the organ-
ization will go into North Caro-
lina for concerts on Saturday
at Montreal, on April 4 and 5 att
Charlotte, on April 6 at Salisbury
and on April 7 at Asheville.
A concert on April 8 at Knox-
ville Tenn. and on April 9 at Lex-
ington, Ky. will conclude the tour.
NINE CONCERTS in four states
are on the schedule for the Men's
Glee Club during spring vaca-
tion.
Directed by Philip A. Duey, the
45-voice group will open the tour
on Friday, at Wilmington, and
conclude on Saturday, April 10,
at Buffalo, N.Y.
Other cities included in the tour
are Bollmington, Ind., on Satur-

BOWLING CLUB - Announce-
ments will be made of the awards
to bowling tournament winners
and high scorers at a get-together
party at 5:15 tomorrow in the
Main Lounge of the WAB. Every-
one who has bowled is welcome,
One representative from each team
is requested to be present.
* * *
FROSH WEEKEND - There
will be a meeting of the Blue Team
floorshow cast for Frosh Weekend
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in the
League Ballroom. All members
are requested to attend the meet-
ig.
DE IV E RYSE RV ICE
9-10-11 EVERY EVENING.
Hamburgers, Sandwiches
Home-baked Pies and Cookies
DAIRY QUEEN PRODUCTS
J EAN'S
SNACK SERVICE
Phone NO 8-6076

Other special attractions slated
to appear in the parade are four
sport cars currently under produc-

tion, the Detroit Edison calliope, day, Rocky River, 0., on Sunday,
the Plymouth Kiltie Band accom- April 4, Canton, 0., on April 5 and
panied by the Dancing Lassies, and Warren, Pa., on April 6.
the Dexter Fire Engine, a relic of Traveling into New York State,
by-gone days, the Glee Club will perform on

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Group of SPRING SUITS of Fine Wools

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11

Sacony esses
and play clothes

.#

If you're the girl in the middle of every-
thing, good easily-cared-for clothes are your
cup of fashion tea. And Sacony dresses and

I

$35.00

$45.00

$65.00

playclothes are for you!

They keep you

tailored b
KIRKLAND HALL
---- ----- --199
America's sweetest suit value at 1~
You saiv it advertised in Charm-the little nipped
cutaway suit that's scissored and shaped to
keep the compliments coming. Cropped collar,
ruler-slim skirt. Sweet surprise: Burlington's spot
and crease resistant shandura, new textured rayon
with the shimmer of silk. Navy, charred grey,
pecan. Sizes 10 to 18.
*(LIFE SAVERS CORPORATION FOR CANDIES,
SUITS --- SECOND FLOOR
D}y. tit
z..' 4r.**2' }q
p N
Definitely
newsworthy,
The Short-Cuff
Sleeve
3 blouse

originally were $39.95 to $98.95

cooly turned out for every occasion
vithout a care.

At $25.00
10 Wool Suits originally $49.95
to $65.00. Group of better ray-
on suits and faille suite. 2-piece
Knit Suits. Better dresses of all
kinds for day and evening wear.
Sizes 9-15, 10-44, 121/2-241/2.
At $5 and $7
2 closeout groups of dresses-.
skirts-blouses-spring hats,
At $3.95
Group of blouses -- ®kirts -
sweaters - hats - nylon slips
--- handbags

At $18.00
BETTER DRESSES
Shantungs - prints laces -
Failes - evening and dinner
wear dresses. Also cotton sweat-
er dresses-all $19.95 values.
Many to $35.00,
At $10.00
Special group of darker crepes
-taffetas-including evening
and cocktail dresses. Many orig-
inally to $29.95,

I

V ~~..--"""

DRESSES

from $10.95

I

1111

Misses-Petites
PLAYCLOTHES , $1.95 to $7.95
Misses

At 49c

At l7c
CLOSEOUT
79c group of simulated pearl
necklaces, 1-2-3 strands-also
costume jewelry pins, earrings,
bracelets, and necklaces,

scan . -
GOOpatt SaK4Yk. MK Yly G [<Ots ,- advertised in LIFE

Closeout
JeweIrv.

group Of costume

I

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1111!

IiUavrie inL fE Va 1#1

MI

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