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March 10, 1954 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-10

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 1954

TILE MI(C IIGAN DAILY

PACE THREE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

n
1 r

Pucksters

Leave

To day

for

NCAA

Playoffs

< -

ATO Beats Sig Eps, 36-35,
In IM Basketball Playoffs

Ice Squad Opens Crown
Defense Friday Evening
Battle RPI in First of Two Game Playoff ;
Michigan Picked as Tournament Favorite

MOST VALUABLE CAGER:
Wolverines Honor Teammate Barron

By MARV SIEGEL
Alpha Tau Omega parlayed the
deadly marksmanship of gridder
Lou Baldacci and some crucial re-
bounding-into a 36-35 victory over
Sigma Phi Epsilon in a second
place "A" Fraternity basketball
contest held at the I-M building
last night.
Paced by big Jay Schattley, who
r netted 12 points, the Sig Eps
jumped to an early lead, but with
Baldacci pumping goals in from
the outside and Bill Booth tally-
ing from inside ATO led 20-17 at
the half.
IN THE SECOND stanza ATO
blew its lead once, regained it,
and staved off a desperate Sigma
Phi Epsilon rally to prevail. Bal-
dacci was high man for the win-
ners with 15 points while Al Fey's
13 markers topped the Sig Ep out-
put.
In another' "A" playoff en-
counter, Phi Gamma Delta over-
came a 14-13 half time deficit
to smash Pi Lambda Phi 36-27.
Varsity tennis star Pete Paulus
proved he was equally adept at
another net game as his 13
points, spear-headed the Phi
Gain attack.
Mary' Cherrin was the big gun
for Pi Lam with five field goals
for ten points. Paulus and Howie
Liverance, who deuced four shots,
were the top sharpshooters for the
victors.
SIGMA Alpha Mu advanced a
notch in its bid to, gain a third
place playoff crown by humbling
Tau Delta Phi, 39 to 10. The Sam-
mies defense was so effective that
the Tau Delts swished nary a
field goal through the twines un-
til after the second half had com-
menced.
Tom Kovan, who netted 13,
and Warren Wertheimer, with
COLLEGE HOCKEY
Michigan State 6, Michigan
Tech 1

six goals scored from the floor,
were the men in double figures
for the Lincoln Avenue five.
Chuck Baruf countered with 9
of Tau Delt's final total of ten.
Theta Delta Chi moved out to a
12-8 half time edge over Delta
Sigma Chi and were never headed
as it eked out a 28-23 triumph in
a third place tussle. Ed Sichler's
ten markers and George Benisek's
all-important eight points sparked
the winners. Bill Pollock racked
up ten tallys in a losing cause.
* * *
BARRY KROLL, a lithe ball
hawk of Alpha Epsilon Pi, led his
fraternity to a 30 to 22 conquest
of Phi Sigma Delta. Kroll, who
scored six field goals and cooly
made four charity tosses offset
the Phi Sig scoring punch of Stu
Sperling and Warren Singer.
Nu Sigma Nu won the only game
on the Professional Fraternity bas-
ketball front last night when it
drubbed Alpha Sigma Nu in easy
fashion, 50-17.

VIC HEYLIGER
.**.seeks fourth straight
Follows Icers
In keeping with The Daily's
policy of "on-the-spot" cover-
age, Hockey Editor Hanley Gur-
win catches a plane this after-
noon for Colorado Springs in
order to send back a first hand
report of the NCAA hockey
tournament.

By PHIL DOUGLIS
Michigan's hockey team takes
off from Willow Run Airport at
12:15 this afternoon for Colorado
Springs, where it will bid for its
fourth consecutive National Col-
legiate Athletic Association title.
The small but physically sound
12 man squad will leave the Mich-
igan Union at 11:45 a.m. for the
airport.
COACH VIC Heyliger's squad
will open its title defense on Fri-
day night, when it tangles with
the Engineers of Rensselaer Poly-
technic Institute in a semi-final
contest at the Broadmoor Hotel
Ice Palace.
The winner of this contest will
meet the winner of Thursday's
Minnesota-Boston College tilt
for the National championship
on Saturday night.
The Wolverines are slight fav-

HoosiernTrackmen Show Unexpected Power
In ConferenceMeet; Knock cM' Out of Second

By DAVE LIVINGSTON
Indiana served notice this past
weekend that Illinois and Michi-
gan no longer hold a monopoly on
Big Ten track glory.
The hustling Hoosiers won the
two mile run and the mile relay,
took four seconds, and placed men
in five other events to snare the.
Conference indoor runner-up tro-
phy that has been in the exclu-
sive possession of Michigan for
four straight years.
INDIANA'S amazing perform-
ance was an especially bitter pill
for the Wolverines to swallow, for,
while Coach Don Canham and his
lads had entered the meet with at
least faint hopes of unseating the
Illini, as it turned out the Maize

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and Blue was relegated to the
third spot.
Only Michigan's two peren-
nial champions, Fritz Nilsson
and John Ross, came through'
with the peak performances it
takes to win Conference crowns.
Each captured his third straight
title, Nilsson with a 52' 7%" toss in
the shot put and Ross with a
4:11.2 mile, the second fastest of
his life indoors.
* * *3
NOTHING CAN be taken away
from such Wolverines as Pete
Gray, Grant Scruggs, and Mark
Booth, who finished right on thel
heels of three of Illinois' most bril-
liant performers, or Roger Maugh
who hit 13' 6" to tie for second in
the pole vault.
There were others who turned
in top efforts, too, but for the
most part Michigan's widely
heralded depth was significant-
ly lacking.
In three events the Wolverines
didn't place a man, in four events
the best they could take was a
fifth, and in just four events did
more than one man finish among
the point scorers.
* * *
SIMILARLY, Illinois paced more
than one man in only four events,
but the Fighting Illini, as had
been expected, hit the jackpt with
six individual championships.
Of particular note was Mich-
igan's poor showing in the three
new events, which had previous-
ly been figured as a boon to its
title chances.
The Wolverines didn't even qual-
ify a man for the 300, took a fifth
in the 600, and managed to take
seconds in the 1,000 for a com-
bined total of only five points in
the three races.
* * *
WITH A LEAD that couldn't
possibly be overcome Illinois
scratching its relay team in the
concluding event, leaving a pair
I-M9Scores
VOLLEYBALL
AFROTC defeated Museum (forfeit)
Psychology 'B' 5, Mineralogy 1
Social Research 4, WRRC 2
DIVING
1) Coleman (Sigma Chi) 57.8 points
2) Shannon (Phi Delta Theta) 46.8
points
3) Lutz (Pi Lambda Phi) 46.0 points
3) Fox (Pi Lambda Phi) 46.0 points
5) Wesinstock (Sigma Alpha Mu) 42.1
points
6) Watson (Sigma Chi) 36.0 points
7) Woodruff (Sigma Chi) 32.4 points
8) Rown (Theta Chi) 29.9 points
I _____

of star-studded Indiana and Mich-
igan quartets to fight it out for
the points that would clinch sec-
ond place in the meet.
The Wolverine foursome of
Pete Sutton, Bob Brown, Jack
Carroll, and Grant Scruggs sped
the mile distance in record-
breaking time, yet Hoosier Len
Robinson fought off Scruggs in
the stretch to win by half a step,
giving his team credit for the
new Big Ten mark of 3:17.6 and
at the same time edging Michi-
gan 423/ to 422 for the runner-
up position.
Amid' the host of Coach Leoj
Johnson's Illini stars Gene May-
nard stood out as one of the finest
middle distance men ever to com-
pete in the Big Ten.
* * *
from behind on the final turn in
first the 1,000 ,and then, 40 min-
utes later, in the 880 to win both
races going away.
As it turned out, though, May-
nard got credit for only one title
as, almost an hour after the
event, the judges announced
that he was being disqualified
in the 880 for changing lanes
too quickly and for "shoving.,
His time of 2:10.7 in the 1,000
shattered the Armory record by 5.3
seconds and was less than two
seconds off the American standard
for the distance. Only a week ago
he ran a 1:52.3 half mile which is
four tenths of a second better than
the Big Ten record.
* * *
THE CALIBER of the over-all
competition in the Championships
can readily be shown when it is
considered that Michigan's Car-
roll ran the second fastest 600 of
his career, yet finished fifth in
the event
Cage Scores
NAIB
Lawrence Tech 75, Carrol (Wis.)
70 ,
Pasadena 79, Bridgeport 60
NCAA
Notre Dame, 80, Loyola (NO) 70
Bradley 61, Oklahoma City 55
NIT
Holy Cross 93, St. Francis
(Kan.) 69
SOUTHEAST
Kentucky 63, Louisiana State 56
NATIONAL JC TOURNAMENT
NE Mississippi 84, Ft. Lewis
A&M 61

orites to win the big one again,
mainly as a result of the twin
victory over Minnesota here lastl
month. Michigan, not counting a
12-8 exhibition loss to the Grand
Rapids Rockets last Saturday
night, steamrolled all opposition
during the second half of the sea-
son.
THE MAIZE and Blue sextet
went 11 straight games without a
defeat, and finished in second
place in the Western- Hockey
League sporting a 14-4-2 mark
R.P.I. is led by diminuitive Ab-
bie Moore, who challenged Min-
nesota's John Mayasich most of
the season for the national scor-
ing lead. The Engineers piled up
a respectable 16-5 mark during
the season's play.
Rensselaer has knocked off such
teams as McGill, Yale, Boston Uni-
versity, Brown, and Princeton to
name a few, while bowing to Den-
ver, Colorado College, Xavier. andj
St. Lawrence.j
* * *
R.P.I.'s UNHAPPY mid-season
Colorado swing, was summed up
by Engineer Coach Ned Harkness,
when he said, "Man, they play real
tough hockey out there." However
these same teams that gave Rens-
selaer nightmares, crumbled before
Michigan by a combined score of
30-10.
Heyliger, however, isn't too
confident over the up-coming
tourney, for he only has two real
lines to make use of. The tour-
ney draw, which has the Wol-
verines playing twice in two
days, is also none too helpful
to the Michigan cause, especial-
ly in Colorado Spring's rarified
atmosphere.
Still, the Wolverines are favored
to cop their fourth straight title.
Pacing Michigan is the crack first
line of Doug Mullen, George Chin,
and Pat Cooney. Mullen was Mich-
igan's top scorer during, the league
season, tallying 18 goals and 34 as-
sists for a 52 point total.
Flashy winger Chin was second
in the scoring column with 20
goals and 25 assists for 45 points.
Slick skating Bill MacFarland, bul-
wark of Heyligers second line, was
third in the scoring department
with 43 points. MacFarland led the
team in goals with 26, and as-
sisted on 17 others.
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By WARREN WERTHEIMER
Jim Barron, Michigan's flashy
sophomore cager, was accorded
two honors yesterday-it was an-
nounced that teammates had vot-
ed him the Wolverines most valu-
able player during the past season
and he was chosen on the second
All-Big Ten team in a poll taken
by sports editors of the conference
newspapers.
It marks the second year in a
row that a soph has been named
Michigan's most valuable, Paul{
Groffsky, the new captain having
been so designated after the 1952-
53 season.
BARRON led the Wolverine cag-
ers in scoring this year tallying
374 points for a 17-per-game aver-
age. His 14-game Big Ten total of
244 was good enough to rank him
among the top ten scorers in the
conference ahead of such veteran
stars as Bob Leonard, Chuck Men-
cel, Ed Kalafat, and Al Ferfari to
name a few.
The Chicago product, posesser1
of a deadly set and driving jump

JIM BARRON
. sophomore sparkplug
shot, plays one of the most ag-
gressive games in the Western
Conference.
However his aggressiveness also
results in his drawing a lot of
charging fouls and because of this
he spent a lot of time on the bench
with four or five personals. This

not only cut into his scoring totals,
but probably cost him a chance of
breaking the Michigan single game
record.
AFTER a 20-point first half
against Washington of St. Louis,
Barron quickly drew his third and
fourth fouls and wasbenched.
When he returned to the contest
in the middle of the last quarter,
he could only bring his total to 26
and missed the record by two
points. Those who watched him
perform this year accord the six
footer a good chance of eventually
cracking the mark.
The all-star quintet that Bar-
ron made is annually voted on
by the Big Ten sports editors.
Paul Ebert, Ohio State, John
Kerr, Illinois, Chuck Mencel of
Minnesota, and Don Schlundt
and Leonard, both of Indiana
make up the first team,
Barron's teammates on the sec-
ond five are Dick Garmaker, Min-
nesota, Julius McCoy, Michigan
State, Carl Cain, Iowa, and Robin
Freemanof Ohio State.

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