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March 09, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-09

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TUESDA'Y', MARCH 9, 1954

SITE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE THREE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9,1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY WAGE THREE

by Ivan N. Kaye

Reeves,

Strauss

Win

-l

Hoop

Tilts.

WE HEARD A LOT of student comment over the past weekend
concerning the fact that Michigan's-track, swimming and wrestl-
ing teams had failed to capture Western Conference titles.
To hear a great many otherwise intelligent people talk, one
might get the idea that finishing second or third in the toughest
ten-team league in the nation was some sort of a disgrace.
Let us state once again our attitude on questions of this
sort. In the first place, we do not subscribe to the idea that finish-
ing second or third when there are ten teams competing in a meet
constitutes grounds for anyone to berate the personnel of the
squads or their coaches. And furthermore, as long as Michigan's
teams continue to give their all, we can see absolutely no reason
for criticism of their accomplishments, even if they should finish
at the bottom of the league.
During four years here we have never yet come across one
instance of an athlete deliberately laying down in competition, and
we, say that with the full knowledge of all the vicious rumors which
have surrounded certain athletic events in which Michigan men
have been defeated.
The Real Value ...
WE CAN SAY WITH all certainty that our athletes go out to win
in their competition-any good athlete at any school will be
guided by an intense desire to win, and the same is true of loyal fans.
But while victory is to be desired and preferred, it must never achieve
a predominance in our thinking which overshadows the real value
of intercollegiate athletics-the value of spirited competition. We
have said this before too, but some things need re-stating every so
often just to keep them in mind.
Michigan has this season three of the most powerful athletic
organizations to appear on the American sports scene in recent years.
In track, swimming and wrestling the University has teams which
are worthy representatives of the school's athletic tradition.
We can see no reason to bemoan the fact that these Wolverine
teams trailed some even more outstanding aggregations at the
Conference meets this past weekend. We can see, however, that
it is time to recognize a genuine, all-out effort, put forth In
keeping with the highest traditions of our competitive standards,
on the part of the personnel and coaches of all three Michigan
teams.
Let Us say in summation that we are justly proud of the accom-
plishments of the Michigan track, swimming' and wrestling squads.
We think their coaches and members deserve commendation for their
spirited performances, and we hope that this University will become
dedicated to the sound principles of intercollegiate athletic compe-
tition and leave the vilification of players and firing of coaches to
those schools much less enlightened.

Teammates Name Groffsky
New Michigan Cage Captain

Paul Groffsky was named cap-
tain of Michigan's 1954-55 basket-
ball team following a vote taken
yesterday by letterwinners from
this season's squad.
Groff sky, a 6-4 junior, was the
team's most valuable player in his
sophomore year when he led the
squad in scoring with 301 points.
While he operated from the pivot
during the 1952-53 season, this
year Coach Bill Perigo used him
as a forward in an effort to give
Michigan more rebounding
strength.
* * *
THUS EXCEPT for the last
three contests on the schedule,
Groffsky worked' almost solely
from the unfamiliar corner spot.
Despite a late season slump, the
Maplewood, New Jersey, dribbler
tallied 247 points, good for an
average of 11.2 per game.
While in high school, Groffsky
was not much more than an
average basketball player. He
came to Michigan during the
season that freshmen were eli-
gile and played on the varsity in
the second semester of his ini-
tial year.
He was not endowed with the
natural ability that others had
and Perigo later said that, "Were
it not for the fact that he always
hustled and scrapped, I would
have dropped him from the
squad."

gg"

PAUL GROFFSKY
... to lead 'M' cagers

HOWEVER Groffsky put in
many extra hours of practice and
not only became good enough to
start, but he also became the most
valuable cager in the eyes of his
teammates and now the leader of
next year's quintet.
Besides the captain, the players
winning a maize 'M' were also an-
nounced yesterday and they are
as follows: seniors John Codwell,
Milt Mead, and Ray Pavichevich;
juniors Don Eaddy, Groffsky, and
Bruce Allen; sophomores Jim Bar-
ron, Tom Jorgensen, Jay Vawter,
and Harvey Williams.

31azin Nets
3 1 Markers
In '13 Game
Six teams advanced into the
second round of the residence hall
intramural basketball "A" divi-
sion playoffs with victories in con-
tests played at the I-M Building
last night.
Strauss whipped Van Tyne, 60-
42, in the highest scoring tilt of
the evening. The Strauss cagers
led 29-20 at halftimerand coasted
in to win. Bob Mills paced the
East Qaud men with 19 points,
while Chuck Steinberg netted 14
counters for the losing Van Tyne
squad.
GOMBERG HOUSE, last year's
champions, had no trouble dis-
posing of Cooley,owinning by a
46-18 score. The Gomberg five led
led at the end of a low scoring first
half, 19-8. Ed Godfrey and Don
Peterson, both of Gomberg, led
the scoring with 11 points each.
Reeves was forced to come
from behind to edge Lloyd, 35-
31. The West Quad men led 15-
12 at halftime, but Reeves fought
back during the last two periods
to gain the win.
After holding a slender 16-14
lead at halftime, Hinsdale turned
on the power to defeat Anderson,
45-29. Bob Hitchmough led the
Hinsdale win, netting 14 points.
'IB" . - *
IN A "B" division playoff con-
test,, Greene defeated Lloyd, 44-21.
Greene cager Pon Mazin was a
one-man team, netting 31 of his
squad's 44 points, 10 more than
were scored by the entire Lloyd
aggregation.
In another "A" game, Win-
chell advanced into the second
round playoffs by trouncing Al-
lan-Rumsey, 41-26. The win-
ners held an 18-14 lead at half-
time.
In other "A" contests, Taylor
defeated Wenley by forfeit, Michi-
gan defeated Adams by forfeit,
and Kelsey won from Hayden by
forfeit.
IN "B" TILTS, Reeves beat Coo-
ley, 26-22; Taylor defeated Wen-
ley, 36-27; Strauss trounced Wil-
liams, 36-17; Anderson won from
Hayden by forfeit; and the Adams
vs. Hinsdale was called a double
forfeit.

By HANLEY GURWIN
Boston College and Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute have been
selected to represent the East in
the NCAA hockey championships
to be played this Thursday, Fri-
day, and Saurday at Colorado
Springs, Colorado.
Michigan's defending champions
will meet RPI in a semi-final game
on Friday night. The winner of
There will be an important M
Club meeting tonight at 7:30.
Assignments for the basketball
tourney beginning tomorrow
will be handed out. There will
also be a short business meet-
ing.
-Dick Yirkosky
this game will meet the winner
of the Minnesota-Boston College
clash to be staged Thursday eve-
ning.
THE TWO eastern squads were
chosen Sunday by a panel consist-
ing of Murray Murdock, Yale's
hockey coach, Harry Cleverly,
coach at Boston University, and
Bill Harrison of Clarkson College.

The pairings for the semi-
final rounds were made yes-
terday morning in Colorado.
For the second *year in a row,
Michigan has drawn the Friday
night game. Last year, the Wol-
verines slaughtered Boston Uni-
versity, 14-2, to establish a new
tournament scoring record.
Coach Vic Heyliger will leave
with a 12-man squad, two less than
last year, from Willow Run Air-
port tomorrow shortly after noon.
A special plane carrying the two
eastern hockey clubs will pick up
the Wolverine icers and fly di-
rectly to Colorado Springs.
BOSTON COLLEGE was given
the nod for the playoffs on the
strength of a 17-2 season's rec-
ord. The Eagles won their last
nine games in a row to cap a high-
ly successful campaign.
The Engineers of RPI were
given the bid partly as a result
of their victory over St. Lawr-
ence last Friday. Rensselaer,
though possessing a 16-5 sea-
son's record, needed the 4-2 vic-
tory over the Larries to insure
the berth.
The Engineers, while losing only
one other game to Eastern compe-
tion, did not fare as well against
western opposition. Denver twice
defeated the Eastern invaders, 8-3
an 3-2, while Colorado College,
which knocked North Dakota right

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FACE RPI ON FRIDAY NIGHT:
'M' to Open Defense of Hockey Crown

out of the Western Hockey League
race, walloped them, 8-3.
MICHIGAN will enter the play-
offs as a pre-tournament favorite,
just as they have for the past six
years. On two occasions, the Maize
and Blue sextet could not get by
the first round, but the other four
times, including the last three in
succession, Heyliger's squad has
brought the coverted trophy back
to Ann Arbor.

Cage Coaches Pick All-Big Ten
Squad; Barron Gains Mention

FAST EFFICIENT * ECONOMICAL
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Do your own laundry in one hour. We will do it for
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I

CHICAGO - (A') - Indiana'sV
Big Ten champions landed two
places Monday on the All-Big Ten
1954 basketball team selected for
The Associated Press by confer-
ence coaches.
The Hoosiers, ready to open de-
fense of their NCAA crown, are
represented by 6-3 Bob Leonard,
FINAL BASKETBALL STANDINGS
IW P Pct.

Schlundt, Leonard and Ebert
are holdovers from the 1953 first
team. Kerr was on the second
team last season.
* * *
THE SECOND team had Carl
Cain of Iowa and Julius McCoy of
Michigan State at forwards;aFrank
Ehmann, Northwestern, at cen-
ter; and Robin Freeman, Ohio
State, and Charles Mencel, Min-
nesota, at guards.
Jim Barron was the on'y Mich-
igan player mentioned in the poll.
The Wolverine guard received
honorable mention.

Late Scores
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NIT Tournament
Western Kentucky 95, Bowling Green
81
Niagara 77, Dayton 74
St. Francis, Loretto, Pa. 81, Brigham
Young 68
NCAA Tournament
North Carolina State 75, George
Washington 73
Navy 85, Connecticut 80
LaSalle 76, Fordham 74
NAIA Tournament
East Texas State 72, Portland, Ore.
59
Springfield, Mo. State 77, East Ten-
nessee State 72
Rio Grande 90, Arizona State 74
NBA
Milwaukee 64, Baltimore 54
Miscellaneous
Tulsa 78, Creighton 69
Rice 72, Texas 71
Marquette 76, Bradley 68
COLLEGE HOCKEY
Michigan Tech 5, Michigan State 3
COLLEGE BOXING
Michigan State 6, Idaho State 3
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Baltimore 13, New York (N) 8
Cleveland 15, Chicago (N) S
Pittsburgh 7, Detroit 3
Cincinnati 10, Brooklyn 6

...... ...
6
6
6

Indiana .............t12
Iowa..............11
Illinois ..........1
Minnesota..........10
Wisconsin............ 6
Northwestern........6
Ohio State ...........5S
Michigan State ....... 4
MICHIGAN..........3
Purdue............. 3

2
3
4
4
8
8
9
10
11

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.786
.714
.714
.429
.429
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.286
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.214

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Team Depth Wins Swim Crow

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coaches, and 6-10 Don Schlundt,
the Big Ten's top scorer.
ROUNDING out one of the tall-
est, heftiest and best scoring units
ever named for the conference all-
star lineup are 6-9 Johnny Kerr
of Illinois, 6-4 Paul Ebert of Ohio
State and 6-3 Dick Garmaker of
Minnesota.
Schlundt, with an average
of 27.1 points for 14 league
games, Kerr with 25.9, Garmak-
er with 24.9 and Ebert with 22.9
were the conference's top four
scorers. The brilliant clutch-
shooting Leonard ranked ninth
with a 16.9 average.
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By DON LINDMAN
The Western Conference swim-1
ming .championships. this year
were supposed to be a contest be-
tween Ohio State's brilliant indi-
vidual stars and Michigan's great
team depth.
As it turned out, the Buckeyes
confounded many experts by un-
veiling team depth almost equal to
that of Matt Mann's squad, and
the result was a 125 point final to-
tal which won the meet.
AS WAS expected, Ohio State
grabbed a lion's share of the indi-
vidual titles, while the Michigan
men gained an almost equal num-
ber of second-place finishes. How-
ever, most of the men who finish-
ed third, fourth, and fifth were
Buckeyes, not Wolverines. Mike
Peppe's charges finished in those
positions 13 times, while the host
swimmers managed only seven
such finishes.
The Ohio State natators also
managed to qualify more men
than did the Wolverines. Coup-

led with the supremacy of such
Buckeye stars as Ford Konno,
Yoshi Oyakawa, Morley Shapiro,
and Dick Cleveland, the surpris-
ing depth of the OSU squad
doomed the Mann-men to the
runner-up position for the sec-
ond successive year.
The only individual winner for
the Wolverines was double-titlist
Bumpy Jones, who edged Illinois'
Bob Clemons in the 200-yard
breaststroke and had no trouble
defending his individual medley
crown.
* * *
MICHIGAN'S widely heralded
Wardrop twins, Bert and Jack,
contributed four runner-up posi-
tions, a fourth place, and a sixth
place to the Wolverine cause. Jack

n for OSU
finished second to the incompar-
able Konno in the 1500-yard, 440-
yard, and 220-yard freestyle races,
being edged out by only a foot in
the 220 and by three feet in the
440. After breaking the Big Ten
and NCAA standards for the. lat-
ter event, only to finish second, he
queried, "What do you have to do
to win in this league?"
Although OSU's Shapiro cap-
tured both diving titles, Jim Wal-
ters of Michigan proved to be the
top diver in the evening programs.
The Wolverine junior easily best-
ed Shapiro in the optional dives,
but couldn't gain the ground he
had lost in the required dives per-
formed during the morning pre-
liminaries.

M
B
A
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PERSONAL INTERVIEWS
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MARCH 11 and 12
Group Meeting will be held at
5:00 P.M. March 10
Boeing has many positions open for graduating
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mathematicians with advanced degrees.
Fields of activity include DESIGN, RESEARCH,
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A group meeting, first day of campus visit, will
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nature of assignments, company projects, etc.,
will be explained. Married students are invited
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Come and learn about these excellent oppor-
tunities with an outstandling engineering organiza-
tion-designers and builders of the B-47 and B-52
multi-iet hnmhrsA America's frst it transnrt

How are YoU
celebrating the arrival
of Spring?
In a brief survey conducted recently on campus,
this question was asked of two people. John T.,
noted campus dud and bore par excellence, when
questioned replied, "So who celebrates Spring?"
But, Bob C.,-campus celebrity, athlete and Calvert
Man of Distinction, when asked the same question
replied, "Silly, I'm going to the SLIDE RULE BALL!"
At precisely 10:45 P.M., March 20, Spring will
arrive and hundreds of happy people at the 25th
annual Slide Rule Ball "Spring Prelude" will be on
hand to welcome it.I
For a nominal sum ($2.50) YOU can be among

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