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March 06, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-06

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Y, MARCH '6, : 954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.

~, MARCH 6, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. ..by Ivan N. Kaye

Wolverine Cagers
Meet MSC Tonight
Teams Meet at East Lansing in Bid
For Eighth Position in Conference

AN ERA ENDS tonight.
An era nearly three decades in length; an era of champions;
an era dominated by the magnetic personality and coaching genius
of one man-this is what passes into history tonight.
This is Matt Mann's valedictory. This is farewell to Ann Arbor
and the university he has carried to the pinnacle of the swimming
world.
The packed house at the Varsity Pool will see more than the
conclusion of a great conference meet tonight; the more than
one-thousand in the audience will witness the last performance
of Michigan swimmers under their peerless leader in the green-
walled natatorium which has been the scene of so many of the
athletic glories of the past.
Although they will hold the National 'Championships later this
month at the Syracuse pool where Matt Mann began his collegiate
coaching career back in 1908, we must consider tonight as his real
farewell, since the nationals even with their tremendous appeal will
present somewhat of an emotional anti-climax.
* * * *
r Statistics Tell the Story...
HIGH ON THE east wall of the Varsity Pool there is written the
statistical measure of Matt Mann's coaching genius-16 confer-
ence championships, 13 national titles, All-American and Olympic
swimmers by the dozen, records by the score and a dual meet per-
centage that defies description-215 victories, 26 defeats, for an aver-
age of .892.
Not included is the brilliant victory in the 1952 Olympic Games
of the Mann-coached United States swimming team.
More than just the numerical symbols of triumph, these fig-
ures reflect the accomplishments of a great and diversified group
of athletes-a group that spans nearly three decades and includes
among others, five top college coaches, two Rhodes scholars,
seven members of the Michigan faculty, the respected West Coast
heart surgkon Buck Simpson and the brilliant novelist and pro-
fessor of English, Allen Seager.
To all of his swimmers, both the great and the average, Matt
Mann has imparted his intense competitive spirit. His motto expresses
perfectly his philosophy of 'swimming: "When the chips are down and
the odds are against you, you don't just swim against time with your
body. You swim against the other fellow with your heart."
"HEART" has been Matt Mann's watchword since he won the boys'
swimming championship of his native England back in 1893.
Thirteen years later he came to America, landing with only two dol-'
lars in his pocket. He reached Buffalo, took a job as a clerk in a dry-
goods store, and continued swimming in his spare time.
He soon attracted the attention of local high school officials who
promptly signed him to coach the Central High School team. The
following year Central captured the Western New York title, with Paul
h Roberts, destined to become a star at Yale and the first of Mann's
great swimmers, leading the way.
The next step up the coaching ladder brought MIann to Syra-
cuse University, where he made a mockery of the old swimming
adage that the crawl stroke was too exhausting to be used for an
entire race. Mann taught his boys to "go hard all the way," and
with a more efficient crawl in operation his team left all opposi-
tion struggling far behind.
Mann went from Syracuse to Brookline, Massachusetts, where he
took charge of the first city-owned pool in the United States. In addi-
tion he coached Harvard and Navy during off hours.
. * *
Success Everywhere .. .
MOVING TO THE New York Athletic Club, he continued to turn
out top-flight swimmers, but finding himself with an excess of
leisure time, he took on coaching assignments at Lawrenceville and
Irvine schools and Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. Finding that even
these assignments did not satisfy his boundless capacity for work,
Mann also contracted to coach Yale's swimmers three nights each
week. At all institutions, and especially at Yale, records fell immed-
iately, and Matt Mann's reputation as a great coach spread far and
wide.
Tales of Mann's ability reached Ann Arbor during the mid-twen-
ties, and Fielding H. Yost, then Director of Athletics, determined to
bring the Englishman to Michigan to handle the newly organized
varsity swimming team.'
Twenty-nine years ago Matt Mann began the brilliant career'
which reaches its Ann Arbor finale tonight. At a recent banquet
held in Detroit at which he was presented with a plaque in com-
memoration of his outstanding contribution to generations ofa
Michigan men, Coac Mann expressed his gratitude in a short
but deeply sincere acceptance.
"They tell me that I'll have to retire this year," he said. "I feel
like I'm fifty instead of seventy. That should give me twenty more
years to coach," he quipped. Then turning serious he said, "I'm not
sure what I'll do next year. You know Michigan has been life itself to
me, and I thank you from the bottom of my heart for the privilege of
coaching your young men." There followed a prolonged standing ova-1
tion which rocked the great dining hall.
S* * * *

THE NEXT few months will doubtless bring many honors and trib-J
utes to Coach Mann, but we have a suggestion for what might
well be the most appropriate tribute of all. In grateful appreciation of
his 29 years of distinguished service, we think it would be altogetherI
fitting and proper for the University to re-name the Varsity Pool in
honor of Matt Mann. This is only a suggestion and let it be taken as7
such, but we like the idea and feel that it would be as meaningful
an honor as could be accorded any retiring coach.
We have made an attempt to set the emotional backdrop for to-,
night's conference finale. We have found it extremely difficult to sum
up 29 years of Michigan swimming in a few printed lines, but Matt3
Mann himself offers an incomparable one-sentence appraisal of thel
past three decades when he says, "It's been great, son!"
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING FAST RESULTS

By LAVERNE LANE
Tonight the Maize and Blue cage
squad will invade East Lansing to
renew its traditional rivalry with
Michigan State in its final game
of the season.
Tonight's game, though having
no bearing in the Big Ten race, is
important to both schools. Not
only will the Spartans be out to
avenge their loss in the last clash
between the two teams but also
the two will be battling for eighth
place in the Big Ten Conference.
The loser will drop down into a
ninth place tie with Purdue which
finished its league season on Mon-
day night.
* * *
MICHIGAN STATE has taken
two of the last three games be-
tween the two schools so the Wol-
verines will be fighting to even
up the score. In the past two sea-

gan trouble under the boards, but
they can also score from outside.
DESPITE THIS seeming array
of stars, the Wolverines and the
Spartans will meet on a compara-
tively even basis. They have won
and lost the same number of
games and have played teams of
relatively equal strength.
Michigan's lineup will probab-
ly include the sophomore duo
from Chicago, Jim Barron and
Tom Jorgenson, both of whom
have had outstanding records in
this their first year of varsity
play.
Paul Groffsky, who came out of
a scoring slump in the Michigan-
Purdue tilt to score 24 points will
also start.
COACH BILL Perigo will also be
depending heavily on guard Don
Eaddy who saved the day for
Michigan in its last encounter with
State by breaking up a deadlock
with a last second basket from 20
feet out. ,
Milt Mead, the 67' center will
have plenty of opportunity to dup-
licate the performance he gave in
Michigan's last home game against
the Boilermakers.
Mead, along with captain Ray
Pavichevich, Jerry Stern, and John.
Codwell, will be bidding farewell
to the hoop squad.

MHoosier
Gym Squads
Meet Tonight
Tean Prepares
For Big Ten Meet
Michigan closes out its dual meet
gymnastic season tonight at
Bloomington as Newt Loken's
charges face Indiana's Hoosiers
in a tune-up for next week's Big
Ten meet.
The heavily favored Wolverines
are shooting for their fifth
straight win and should get it
without too much trouble. The
only factor in Indiana's favor be-
side a home gym, is that Michi-
gan's Bill Winkler was left at home
with 'the flu, weakening the Maize
and Blue trampoline hopes con-
siderably.
WOLVERINE captain Mary
Johnson will use this meet to re-
gain his winning stride after suf-
fering a sprained wrist a week ago.
Johnson was very rusty in Wed-
nesday's victory over MSC, and
ILoken hopes that the Indiana test
will prepare the versatile star for
next weeks conference meet in
Columbus.
The Hoosiers, boasting wins
over Notre Dame and Northwest-
ern, while having lost to Illi-
nois and Iowa among others, are
an average team, with only four
outstanding men.
Ron Feigl is a good worker on
the high bar, Jim Boyer and Ron
Johnson carry the Crimson hopes
on the trampoline, and Mark
Truex is the Hoosier threat on the
flying rings and in tumbling.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 "2.24 3.92
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-35mm Camera. Call Professor
Wooding, NO 3-1728. ) 107A
LOST-DENTAL PARTIAL. Silver col-
ored with one tooth near one end.
Reward. Call NO 3-2774. )108A
FOR SALE

ROOMS FOR RENT
ONE LARGE SINGLE room near campus
-maid service, refrigerator privileges.
Call NO 2-7108. )41D
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Rooms by Day or Week
Campus Tourist Homes. Ph. NO 3-8454
518 E. Williams St. (near State)
)25D
ROOMS for Male Students near Union.
Cooking privileges. Call NO 3-8454.
)40D
LARGE PLEASANT ROOM-Completely
equipped for light housekeeping, elec-
tric refrigerator, electric plate, all
utilities. Must have a car. $10.00 a
week. Phone NO 2-9020. )53D
SINGLE ROOM-Warm and comfortable,
private wash room. One block from
campus. $5 per week. Call NO 8-7379.
)54D

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING EXPERTLY DONE-Pickup and
delivery. Phone 3YP 5877.. )332
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Buff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. F'ree pick-up
and delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. 121
TYPING, MIMEOGRAPHING - Steno
service. We specialize in legal, thesis
and manuscript work.
A. A. PERSONNEL SERVICE
304 Municipal Court Bldg. NO 2-1221.
)341
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Phone NO 8-7590. 830
So. Main. )3i
WANTED TO RENT
THREE DENTAL STUDENTS want nice
apartment next fail-close to campus.
Call 1 Hayden House 2-4591. )7K

FOR RENT

ROLLEIFLEX-3.5. Used for '54 Ensian; SIAMESE CAT-Stud service, call NO
$185. Call Mike, NO 3-8517. )341B 2-9020. )33C

'GIVEN PRO TRYOUT:
Chin's Tallies Win Important
Contests for Maize and Blue

ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 S. Washington. )14B
A MEDIUM blue-grey gabardine suit.
Single breasted, sport style. Like new,
size 40 regular. Very reasonably pric-
ed. Call NO 3-1904 after 8 p.m. on
weekdays only. Ask for Steve. )299B
1946 MERCURY CLUB COUPE-Radio
and heater. Loaded with extras. 222
W. Washington, Phone 2-4588. )321B
BATTERIES $5 EXCHANGE
Guaranteed - Free Installation
BATTERY STORES ASSOCIATION
Liberty and Ashley - NO 3-5113
)329B
RECLINING, UPHOLSTERED, tapestry
chair with wooden arms and footstool
-fair condition, $10. Two large side-
boards, $6 each, can be painted. Coal
hot water heater with two stovepips,
$7.50. Muntz table model 14" TV set
with antennae hardly used, $65. Ma-
jestic portable radio with inside and
outside aerial, $50. Pocket size radio
without batteries, $15. Phone NO
2-9020. )328B
1946 FORD 2-door, V-8, black; radio
and heater, good transportation.
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton, NO 2-4588. )335B
1947 DODGE, 2-door. Blue; radio and
heater-new tires, low mileage. Very
clean. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )334B
1946 CHEVROLET ARROW - 2-door;
green. Radio, heater; excellent trans-
portation. Huron Motor Sales, 222
West Washington. NO 2-4588. )342B
APARTMENT SIZE PETS. Baby Para-
keets and Canaries, any age. $6 and
$8. Mrs. Ruff ins, 562 S. 7th. ) 340B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Argus A-2, 35mm. camera and case,
$15. Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 S.
University, NO 8-6972. )339B
1950 FORD CLUB COUPE-Blue. Radio
and heater; 30,000 miles; one owner.
Sharpest used car in Ann Arbor!
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )343B

FOR RENT-Nice room, equipped for
light housekeeping with hot and cold
running water, electric plate, all utili-
ties. Must have a car, Phone NO
2-9020. $8 for single, $10 for double,
per week. )34C
FURNISHED Apartment-Three rooms,
private bath, first floor, near campus.
Suitable for three adults. Available
March 15. Phone NO 3-5201. )36C
2 OR 3 ROOM furnished apartment close
to campus. Phone NO 2-1115. )37C
ROOM AND BOARD
3 MEALS A DAY for $2. The best cook
in townl Close to campus. Call NO
3-1841 or drop in at 1108 Hill St. )19E
PERSONAL
YES, WE'RE OPEN - Phone Student
Periodical, NO 5-1843. )73F
HELP WANTED
SUMMER CAMP JOBS, Ann Arbor area.
Couples, Men, Women. Four weeks
or eight weeks. Phone 3-0067. )70H
CAN YOU DESIGN and build gadgets?
Run chemical analyses? For occasion-
al jobs call NO 8-6988 afternoons. )69H
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments. Ph.
NO 2-2678. 510 Catherine Street near
State. Alta Graves.
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERSI Portable and Standard
for rent, sales, and service.
MORRILLS
PIANO SERVICE - Tuning, repairing.
Work guaranteed. Call University Mu-
sic House, NO 8-7515. )271

RAY PAVICHEVICH
. .. Captain's last game
sons none of the games have been
decided by a margin of more than
four points.
Julius McCoy will be the man
to watch in the Spartan line-up.
The sophomore from Pennsyl-
vania has already broken the
Spartan single season scoring
record in his first year on the
varsity team. A jump-shot ex-
pert, he has been averaging 18.3
points per game.
Al Ferrari, another top forward
on the Green and White squad,
will se s plenty of action. He and
McCoy are the leaders of the Spar-
tan scoring attack. Coach Pete
Newell's ace defense men are Bob
Devenny and Jim Schlatter and
not only will these two give Michi-
T op Collegiate
'Cage Squads
M~eet in NVIT
Six Collegiate basketball teams
will swing into action tonight
opening up the National Invitation
Tournament in New York City.
Tonight's tripleheader pits
Louisville against St. Francis of
Brooklyn, Dayton against Man-
hattan, and Wichita against Bowl-
ing Green. There will also be a
tripleheader on Monday night,
and doubleheaders on Tuesday
and Thursday evenings. The finals
of the tournament will be held
next Saturday night.
THE OTHER six quintets in the
twelve team field include the top
seeded fives, Duquense, Holy Cross,
Western Kentucky, Niagara Brig-
ham Young and St. Francis of
Pennsylvania.
On the strength of the season's
record, Duquense has been tabbed
as the favorite to cop the title won
last year by Seton Hall. Western
Kentucky, defeated once during
the campaign and Holy Cross have
the best chance of defeating Du-
quense, although the History of
the N.I.T. has been marked by
numerous upsets, and the title can
be won by any team that happens
to hit a hot streak.
; e41~1

By DAVE BAAD
A few years ago, Connie Smythe,
wily general managerof profes-
sional hockey's Toronto Ma-
ple Leafs was discussing his
methods of evaluating players in
terms of salary worth.
He enumerated that the number
of points or goals a player scored
meant less than the importance
of each scoring effort.
S* s
IF MOST of the points came
in one-sided affairs where they
made little difference in the out-
come of the game he paid them
less than if they had scored a
fewer amount of goals but depos-
ited them in the net as tying or
winning markers.
If college hockey players were
evaluated accordingly, George
Chin, would undoubtedly be one
of the highest paid players in
the game.
The stocky Lucknow, Ontario,
senior, now playing his third sea-
son for the Wolverines has spe-
cialized in crucial goals through-
out his career.
FOR THE PAST two years he
has sparkled with the pressure on
in the NCAA tournament, topping
all scorers each time with four
points in 1952 and six in 1953.
Equally significant, the 170
pound speedster fired home the
all important first goal in each
tournament to send the Wolver-
ines into early leads.
Chin has come up with big
scores on at least four different
occasions during the 1953-54 cam-
paign. He tallied the winning goals
in the two 3-2 victories over Michi-
gan State, scored three consecu-
tive times against Colorado to
break a second period 2-2 tie,
and collected the opening marker
in the first Minnesota game a lit-
tle over a week ago.
* * *
IN OVERALL scoring the color-
ful right wing is second to line-
mate Doug Mullen this season
with 20 goals and 25 assists for 45
points.
He also follows close behind.
Mullen in scoring for his three
years of Michigan hockey, an-
nexing 117 points including 54
goals.
Chin came to Vic Heyliger's sex-
tet from the top-ranking amateur
International Hockey L e a g u e
where he toiled two years for the
Windsor Spitfires and Chatham
respectively.

WHILE WITH Chatham he
notched 55 points to lead the cir-
cuit scorers, and both years in
the league he was a member of
the championship aggregation.
This added to his two cham-
pionship seasons with Michigan
makes a total of four straight
title winning teams for Chin.
While playing in, the Interna-
tional League, George had a try-
out with the Toronto Maple Leafs
and was given pro feelers from
both the Leafs and Detroit Red

Coming MONDAY

RADIO SERVICE
Auto -Home -Portable
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Fast and Reasonable Service
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1214 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
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)51

TODAY,
and Sunday
Only

ORPH EUM

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SHOWS AT 1:30 -3:15- 5:00 - 7:00 - 9:00

FEATURE-LENGTH
AD VENTUR l
A 21 Ml..tCato ?4wdtT
color by TICNICOLOS
OiftribtN M ll. sta Os tri lm oS.. ML1

GEORGE CHIN
... hockey stalwart

Wings. The trial with Toronto
along with the two NCAA cham-
pionships, are counted among his,
biggest athletic thrills._
* * *
THE CHIN dynasty at Michi-
gan may be reestablished in a few
years. George's brothers Jack and
Charlie are presently playing Ca-
nadian amateur hockey and are
reportedly Ann Arbor bound aft-
er completion of high school.
Bill and Abe Chin, older broth-
ers of George had tryouts with the
Toronto Maple Leafs
Chin, a geology major, plans to
go to England next fall for post-
graduate work and a little more
hockey in the English leagues.
LvQ i~I
Positively Ends Monday
INMASCOPE
of the
-ondTIl

TODAY

r. I r4 I 11014

w

TOD

AY f Sat., S
DAY G R55c
GOOFY GOLFERS RUNNING WILD!

un. 1:30
-- 18c

presents

I

it

i

THEIR NEWEST LAUGH RIOT!
DEAN J ! !
DONNA BARBARA f:<: ((i/

ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
"THE 39 STEPS"

I

ROBERT DONAT

0

GLENN MILLER mn! f

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