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October 01, 1953 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1953-10-01

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r

PAGE TWO74 THE MICHIG1AN DILTY

THURSDAY. OCTOBER 1. 1452

4

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3

GU WEST, YOUNG MEN:
Englishmen Enjoy Life In Hearse

By ARLENE LISS
"We call ourselves the four
hearsemen of the apocalypse."
Peter Hussey, one of four young
Englishmen who passed through
Ann Arbor in a hearse yesterday
was explaining how he and his
companions happened to be trav-
eling West in their morbid con-
veyance.
"WE GOT TIRED of office life
and just decided to see something
of the country," the red-bearded
Englishman continued. The four
hope when they get out West to
"find some gold waiting for us
in the bottom of a reservoir."
Meanwhile they are working
their way across the country,
stopping to work whenever they
need money. Mostly they do con-
struction work, their last job be-
ing to help build a grain ele-
vator. Aside from the jobs they
can get, their only other asset is
the hearse "about the only thing
we've got to offer."
Anthony Norgrove, the only
dark-haired member of the quar-
tet, claims that the hearse is very
comfortable. "We've got a stove
fixed up and we sleep in sleeping
bags and air-cushion mattresses.t
We've even put up flowered cur-
tains," he added.
* * *
THE THIRD member of the ex-
pedition,. Tom Walters, quickly
claimed another advantage of the
hearse." Hitchhikers put their
thumbs down very quickly when
they see us coming-they're- not,
dying to ride in it."
Walters also explained that
besides doing odd jobs the group,
is in contact with the British

Seniors
Seniors may still make pic-
ture appointments for the 1954
'Ensian by calling the Student
Publications Bldg., 2-3241.
Pictures will be taken this
week and through next week.
SRA-CRC
Series Set

Courthouse
Construetion
Set ToBegin
Work may begin early next week
in the building of Washtenaw's
new County Courthouse according
to City officials.
A contract which set the cost
of the building at $2,682,000 wass
awarded Tuesday to a building
firm in Dearborn. The Board of

Two panel discussions and four Supervisors voted unanimously to
accept the company's bid which
lectures on religion and its rela- was the lowest of six bids received.
tion to the contemporary scene * * ,
will highlight a Religious Sym- SIGNING OF the contract is ex-
posium to be held during October pected soon, perhaps today, and
and November. the construction work, estimated
to take 22 weeks, may begin early
The symposium is being spon- next week.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYC
2 .60 1.34 1 96
3 .70 1.78 2,94
4 .90 2,24 392
Figure 5 average words to a tine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Impt. papers clipped together;
on Fri. or Sat. Reward. Phone 2-5117.
Arnold Knepfer. )3A
LOST-I. D. bracelet: "Ellen". Reward.
Phone Ellen Brown, 398 Jordan. )6A
FOR SALE
SOLID WALNUT GATELEG TABLE, $25.
One large double coil springs, $15.00.
One upholstered chair, $1.00. One large
walnut veneer table and five chairs,
$25. One wool rug, $35. Two large wal-
nut veneer buffets, $15 each. One
small steel, folding cot, $10.00. Large
child's coaster wagon, $4.00. Phone
2-902Q, )13B

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
TIME FOR A SPOT OF TEA--Four Englishmen who admit to
being perfectly happy living in a hearse enjoy the first afternoon
tea they have had in a month.
* * * * * *

sored by the Student Religious
Association and the Campus Reli-
gions Council. Opening on Octo-
ber 13 with a panel on "Religion
Molds Society," the first topic will
be discussed by five faculty mem-
bers: Prof. Marvin Eisenberg of
the fine arts department, Gerhard
Lenski of the sociology depart-
ment, Prof. Kenneth Boulding of
the economics department, Prof.
George Harrison of the English
department and moderator Prof.
Frank Huntley of the English de-
partment.
Other topics in the symposium
will be "Religion Reshapes the
Community," "Religion Motivates

3
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Browne Talks
On Australia
At Conference
Since it is closely controlled by
the state government, the Austral-
ian educational system is very dif-
ferent from the United States
school system that is decentraliz-
ed, Prof. George Browne, Dean of
School of Education at the Univer-
sity of Melbourne, Australia, ex-
plained.
He spoke yesterday at the Con-
ference on Comparative Educa-
tion.
Although Australia's system
keeps academic standards very
high, it does so at the expense of
the weaker pupil who is not of-
fered a more general, education
suited to his ability, Prof. Browne
revealed.
4 "
THEREFORE, comparing Aus-
tralian and U.S. high school stu-
dents Prof. Browne said, one would
estimate that although the Aus-
tralian student would be eight
months to a year ahead of the
American in language, and other
academic subjects, he would be
about three years behind the
American pupil in "good gracious
living and savoir-faire."
THREE LECTURES on current
research in Comparative Educa-
tion were given yesterday morn-
ing as part of the Education Con-
ference: "Theses and Dissertations
about Indian Education at the
University of Michigan, by N. J.
Kaul, Grad.; Dissertations about
Education in Japan," by Fred Ker-
linger, Wayne University; and "A
Field Trip to Africa," by Edward
Coleson, Huntington College.

Information Service and takes
part in panel discussion or gives,
talks in high schools and col-
leges. After their Ann Arbor
stop, they will go to Albion Col-
lege where they are scheduled
for a lecture.
The self styled four musketeers
all come from different back-
grounds and met accidentally in
New York. "We were playing
cricket, rugby and that sort of
thing," Hussey remarked. Finding
that they all wanted to learn about
the United States and pick up ex-
perience, they decided to make the
trip together and started on Aug-
ust 13.
* * *
HUSSEY WAS born in the Ar-
gentine where he grew up among
several revolutions, "quite blood-
less," he added. After "the usual
sort of thing-school and Cam-
bridge" he joined the Royal Navy
where he served as a sub-lieuten-
ant. Coming to the U.S. several
years ago, Hussey decided to settle
here because he liked the life and
found business opportunities more
favorable. .
Eric Keble served in the In-
dian army for four years as a
"left-tenant, you say lieuten-
ant," in Queen Alexander's Own
Regiment, 3rd Gurkha Rifles.
During his four years service
nothing unduly exciting happen-
ed, "I didn't do any pig-sticking
or play polo, I just lived the life
of a pukkha sahib."
Coming to America to gain in-
dustrial experience, Anthony Nor-
grove is getting this knowledge on
the trip by visiting factories on
the way. Norgrove graduated from
Oxford where he studied mathe-

matics and engineering and played
soccer with Mike Faber who did
graduate work at the University
last year. -

WALTERS admits to living a Occupations." "Religion Stimu-
varied life, having lived in the lates Scientific Inquiry," "Religion
Argentine, served in the navy, and Changes the Individual" and "Re-I
held many jobs. He is in the ligion Challenges the World."
United States to learn about to- Theewlals
bacco, "I read an articles and it There wi so be an iterview
sounded interesting." After the with speakers and discussions of
trip he intends to go to Southern ea by campus religious
Rhodesia to grow tobacco, leaders.
So far the tour has been "sur-
prisingly free of all untoward hap- Sh H
penings." But Tuesday night the Speech H eari
quartet camped on the island
where they admitted to frighten-
ing off quite a few couples.

The building of the courthouse
will be financed by a $3,250,000
bond issue which was passed by
Washtenaw County voters last
fall. Plans now call for a lime-
stone exterior to the building
with Indiana Limestone to be
used around the windows. Other
features approved are an elec-
tronic clock system and plastic
covered doors.
The contract also includes a
100-car parking lot at the rear
of the new building and the re-
moval of the old Courthouse.
* * *
THE REMAINDER of the bond
issue will be used for furnishings,
$141,175; for architect's fees,
$108,000, interest on the bonds,
$60,000; and $5,000 for legal fees.
A contingency fund of about $250,-
000 has been set aside for miscel-
laneous and unforeseen expenses.
R. S. Gerganoff, an Ypsilanti
architect prepared the plans for
the new Courthouse.

ng Group
Campus

ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military .supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington, )14B
YOUNG BUDGIES or Parakeets, also
singing canaries, bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. 7th, Ph. 3-5330. 115B
1952 CHEVROLET -- Black four door,
radio and heater. Excellent condi-
tion. Very clean. Complete service
record available. Call 2-3246, 8 to 5
p.m. Monday thru Friday. )20B
EVERGREENS: at wholesale
Pfitzer Juniper ..........$2.50 to $7.50
Pyramidal Arbor Vitae ..$2.00 to $5.00
Spreading Yew ..........$2.25 to $4.50
Dwarf Mugho Pine ...$2.50 to $4.00
Also Blue Spruce, hemlock, fir, etc.
Call Michael Lee 8-574 or see me
4100 Chem. Bldg. afternoons. )36B
HIGH FIDELITY portable 3 speed phon-
ograph with microphone. Dirt cheap.
3-0521, Ext. 835. )43B
1950 CROSLEY CONVERTIBLE-14,600
miles, excellent condition. $400. Ph.
3-2370 after 6 p.m. )42B
FIFTY CLASSICAL LP's at one half
price or less. Ph. 2-9185. )41B
PURCHASE at "PURCHASE" -- Two-
section tripod with pan head. Regular
$13.75, special $9.25. Purchase Camera
Shop, 1116 S. University. )50B
FOR SALE-Men's Schwinn Bike. Very
good condition, $25. Phone 2-9257.
)47B
KAISER '47-Black 4-doorssedan, newly
rebuilt motor, good tires, new trans-
mission. $350. Phone 3-0611. )46B

FOR SALE
1936 OLDS-Excellent motor, runs good.
Call 2-7409 and ask for Ken. )45B
FOR SALE-Wearing apparel-Misses
size 9-10. Dark green and rust winter
coat, imported British wool, $40. Pur-
ple short coat, Strook wool. Orchid
shortie, Kashmoor, taffeta lining. At-
tractive dresses, everything immacu-
late condition. Shoes, 4-4'%B. 1339
So. State St., cor. Granger. )44B
"MOTORIZED BICYCLES"-English 3
gear Hercules with Minimotor. 1
man's and 1 woman's. Used 2 months.
Phone 3-0260. )51B
KODAK FOLDING CAMERA-$8. 616
West Madison, phone 7398. )52B
FOR RENT
BACHELOR GIRL Apt. New kitchens
and tile baths. Call at 305 E. Liberty
or phone 3-5062. )C3
LARGE attractive first floor furnished
apt. with basement. Heat and water
included. Fireplace and baby grand.
Spacious grounds. Ideal for couple or
single men, Children accepted. Call
25-7006. 2223 S. Main. )5C
TWO ROOM SUITE with cooking facili-
ties. Very close to campus near Med.
Bldg. Phone 2-8606. )6C
TWO ROOM SUITE-2 boys, close to
campus. Linens furnished, 319 E.
Jefferson. 2-1859.. )7C
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Reserve rooms now for Football Week-
ends. Rooms by Day or Week. Campus
Tourist Homes. Ph. 3-8454. 518 E.
Williams St. (near State) )3D
ROOM AND BOARD
LARGE front room for rent near cam-
pus, one or two students, call 3-8490.
)4D
STILL A FEW room and board openings
at 1617 Washtenaw. Room $30 per
month. Free linen and porter service.
Board $2.10 per day for three meals.
Phone 3-2360. )6E
BOARD for southeast campus area.
$2.10 per day. Three meals. Generous
refund policy. 1617 Washtenaw. Ph.
3-2360. )7E
PERSONAL
PIANO INSTRUCTION - Don-David
Lusterman is now accepting students
for the new school year. Phone 6719.
)3F
VOICE LESSONS-Call David Murray.
Graduate vole major. Corrected Ph.
2-7306 between 6-7 p.m. )9I
I SAY OLD GUY, at it again? Collect
your senses, get new values; meet
me at 8 p.m. the 15th. Wesley's
lounge. G. Fox. )5F
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED to Flint Friday af-
ternoon. Returning Sunday. Charles
Kroll, 433 Williams, W. Q. )4G
HELP WANTED
PART TIME WORK in plating control
laboratory for student with at least
2 years chemistry. Apply Universal
Diecasting & Mfg. Corp. 232 Monroe
St. Saline. Michigan. )20H

HELP WANTED
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Part time sales work, We 'can use
you if you are ambitious and want to
get ahead. Many pf our part time
men can earn $40-$50 per wk. No
experience necessary. You will work
with capable supervisors. If you own
a car and can work 10 hours per week,
call 2-6258 between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
for appointment.
IDEAL JOB for graduate student carry-
ing only light schedule or writing
thesis. Year around with opportunity
to study on job. Require some skill
in mechanics, carpentry and painting.
Good sales personality essential. Ph.
2-2887.
PART TIME WAITRESS-I hour at
noon; 2 hours in evening. Clark's Tea
Room, 1217 Observatory. )22H
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Part time sales work. We can use you,
if you are ambitious and want to get
ahead. Many of our part time men
earn $40-$50 per week. No experience
necessary. If you own a car and can
work 10 hours per week, call 2-6258
between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. for ap-
pointment. )21H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS? Portable and Standard
for rent, sales and service.
MORRILLS
314 S. State St., Phone 7177
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"5Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
112 blocks east of East Eng. )51
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-
up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )2I
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN; Voice
Development in singing and speak-
ing. Member research commitee;
Nat'l. Assoc. Teachers of Singing Di-
rector, Walden Woods Voice Confer-
ence, Author of Emergent Voice. Stu-
dio, 715 Granger; phone 6584. )10I
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED-Rooms for Medical School
Reunion. Single and double rooms
are needed for medical alumni return-
ing to Ann Arbor wishing to rent
rooms for this period are urgently
asked to call the Medical School Of-
fice. Ph. 3-1511, ext. 413. )1K

Traffic Jams
To.Be Avoided
By New Stairs
Although congestion of between-
classes traffic has continued this
fall to be a problem between Angell
Hall and the Mason-Haven Hall
addition, University officials ex-
pressed hopes yesterday that the
situation will be relieved soon.
With remodeling projects con-
centrated on the central stairway
from the main floor of Angell Hall.
to the basement on the same level
as the main floor of the new Mason
Hall addition, a temporary en-
trance blockade stifles student
traffic between the two buildings.
* * *
THE PRESENT construction in-I
volves rebuilding of the central
stairway so that all levels between
Angell Hall and Mason Hall will
be connected. In order to accom-

By PAUL LADAS "Instructors are constantly in1
The long list of professional fra- demand by hospitals, state schools,
ternities at the University was in- public schools, and private cin-
creased last spring with the estab- ics," Miss Curtisconcluded.
lishment of the Alpha Beta chap-
ter of Sigma Alpha Eta, speech . G u
and hearing education fraternity. T. ric H OSi Group
The organization is composed of ToUHo ''
any University undergraduate or I H M eetlg
graduate student who is majoring
in the field of speech correction The Continuation Committee of
or accoustic handicap therapy. the National Conference on Trich-
*I t * inosis will hold an all day meet-
ITS AIM IS to collect students ing tomorrow at the Rackham
who are studying speech and hear- Bldg.
ing education and allow them to Existing technical and legal
exchange ideas, learn new techni-
goes an beomebettr aquant-problems concerninlg eradication
ques, and become better acquaint- of this pork-borne disease will be
ed, according to Philip Yantis, considered at the Conference.
Grad. Plans will also be made for the
At the monthly meetings, lec- second National Conference on
tures, movies, and discussion on Trichinosis to be held in Chicago
related fields are presented. j in the spring.
The membership consists of 50 Dr. S. E. Gould of Wayne Coun-
students, 12 of whom have ful- t General Hospital is chairman
fulled the one semester member- of the Continuation Committee.
ship and received their keys, while
38 students have joined this se-
mester. , -

t DIA~

55c

I

PKIAT~

4

READ AND USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

Stason Heads
ABA Group.
Prof. E. Blythe Stason, Dean of
the law school, has been appointed
chairman of a special committee
of the American Bar Association,
it was reported yesterday.
The seven-member committee
will study legal aspects of atomic,
energy and submit recommenda-,
tions to the Joint Atomic Energy.
Committee of Congress, regard-
ing provisions of the Atomic En-
ergy Act of 1946.

III 71

plish this reconstruction task, the * * *
women's lounge on the basement OFFICERS OF Sigma Alpha Eta
floor of Angell Hall was moved are Philip Yantis, Grad., president;
and remodeled. Vonda Genda, '54, vice-president;
According to Lynn W. Fry, sup- James Sonnega, Grad., recording
ervising architect, the addition of secretary; Beth Hansen, '54, cor-
the stairway is the "most exped- responding secretary; and Sylvia
ient" way to relieve traffic con- Coplow, '54, treasurer.
gestion brought on by joining An- Michigan is the 26th chapter
gell Hall to the two new buildings. of Sigma Alpha Eta, with the
Tat.r --- - . , 7..4 L. n + k .* , - nrAA 0

DAILY

OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Dixie Eats at
Red's Rite Spot

Fry pointed out that another
factor leading to the crowded hall-
ways is the passage way used for
traffic from the street to other
buildings on the campus as a
short-cut.1
Completion date for the pro-4
ject has not been set, but Fry
concluded that the work should be
finished soon.

first chapter being founded at
Pennsylvania State College. Na-
tional headquarters of the fra-
ternity are located at Louisiana
State University.
According to Ruth Curtis, fac-
ulty advisor of Sigma Alpha Eta,
"Speech and hearing instruction
offers excellent opportunities as a
career."

Coming
FRIDAY

Qorpheum CINEMA
:: ., . . .t>

60c

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tivenotice to all members oftthe
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1953
VOL. LXIV, No. 9
Notices
Regents' Meeting. Fri., Oct. 16, at
9:30 a.m. Communications for consid-
eration at this meeting must be in the
President's hands not later than Oct.
8, 1953.
University Convocation. A convoca-
tion, honoring the fiftieth anniversary
of instruction in professional forestry
at the University, will be held in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall at 10:30 a.m. Fri.,
(Continued on Page 4)

Iai

>?S>:.A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
plus
"DANGEROUS
WHEN WET"
ESTHER WILLIAMS
JACK CARSON
FERNANDO LAMAS
TODAY AND FRIDAY

i

_--

DROLL ALASTAIR SIM
IN A SPARKLING HIT
u appe nt/sp 44wb
t~m~c

El -

Prices This Attraction Only
Matinees 60c Eves & Sun, 80c

I

"May be the Best Picture
of oil time."-Times
The Boldest Best-Seller
Of All Is Now On
The Screen! ,,r

"First-class entertainment
. .. that leaves the aud-
ience laughing!"
-Cameron, News

Extra
MR. MAGOO
"Pete Hothead"

I

-

UTLANCASTER -MONTGOMERY CUPT
KE RR-FRANKSINATRA- DONNA

Fi

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"... play out of the ordinary"--N.Y. MORNING TELEGR API-I
t. . . programs unusually rewarding"-MICHIGAN DAILY
"established . . . as an institution in the con munity"
-ANN ARBOR NEws
THE ARTS THEATER
2097/2 E. Washington Phone 7301
Memberships now on sale at Bob Marshall's Book Store,
Wahr's Book Store, The Music Center, and the Club

I

Ii

From your honey,
you'll get a hug,
When you buy her
a BALFOUR Mug.
Traditional mugs make
a nice gift for the lady
in your life.
Headquarters for the finest
in fraternity-sorority jewelry,
gifts, favors, novelties, rings,
stationary, and many other

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f
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s
hen you pouse. . make. if counf...'h 'a Coke
r
J
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,

YOUNG DEMOCRATS
FIRST MEETING

will be held

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k'rTnRI:D 'I 7.2f P iA

11

III

!',

I UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL prosents I 1

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