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September 29, 1953 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1953-09-29

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1953

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc
tive notice to all members of th
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1953
VOL. LXIV, No. 7
Notices
Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Students.
All students who had their recom-
mendations completed in the Semester
1952-53, and who will desire to have
further recommendations sent this year,
are to contact the Preprofessional Sec-
retary in 1213 Angell Hall and notify
her of their intentions immediately, so
that she may prepare additional copies
of their recommendatios. This will ex-
pedite matters for both the student
and the office.
Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Students,
who expect to apply for admission to a
professional school for the Fall of 1954.
The University has an evaluation sys-
tem which is acceptable to all Ameri-
can medical and dental schools. Both
the University Medical and Dental
schpols require applicants from with-
in he University to use this plan ex-
clusively. Student who wish to apply
to other professional schools should
also make use-of this system. The plan
is designed to reduce the burden of
both students and faculty members in
requesting and answering personal
recommendations. Students should ob-
tain a brief mimeographed explana-
tion of the system in 1213 Angell Hall
and make an appointment there with
the Preprofessional Adviser. Catalogs
and material are on hand for all the
approved medical and dental schools
in 1213 Angell Hall.
Applications for Grants in Support
of Research Projects. Faculty members
who wish to apply for grants from the
Reseach Funds to support r'esearch pro-
jects during the next school year
should file their applications in the
Office of the Graduate School by Mon.,
Oct. 12, 1953. Application forms will be
mailed on request or can be obtained
at 1006 Rackham Building, telephone
372.
Freshman Testing Program. A make-
up ession for freshmen who either
missed all of the testing sessions dur-
ing orientation week or those people
who were absent on Friday morning,
Sept. 18, or Saturday morning, Sept.
19. Please report to Hill Auditorium
at 7:30 p.m., Wed., Sept. 30. The ses-
son wil last until 10 p.m. For further
information call Ext. 2297.
Freshman Testing Program. A make-
up session for freshmen who missed the
sesson' on Frday afternoon, Sept. 18,
only. Please report to Auditorium B,
Angell Hall at 7:30 p.m., Wed., Sept.
30.
Members of the Graduate Faculty.
Applications for Summer Faculty Re -
search Fetlowships for the Summer
Session of 1954 should be filed in the
Office of the Graduate School by Sat.,
Oct. 10, 1953. Application forms will be
failed on request, or can be obtained
at 1006 Rackham Building, telephone
372.
Attention Entertainers. All bands and
other talent interested in working sign
up at the I.F.C. offices, 30 of the Union,
any week day from 3 to 5 p.m. This
information is urgently requested.
Lecture SerIes Ushers. Tickets for
ushering at the Oratorical Association
Lectures should be picked up by the
following people on Tues., Sept. 29, be-
tween 5 and 6 p.m., at Hill Audi-
torium.
Donald W. Allyn
Stanley Aizinas
Solviega Aizina
Allen Abrams
Margaret Abright
Phyllis Ash
Nancy L. Anderson
Raymond Bahor
Allen Berson
Judith Bender,
Floyd Brinley
Javier Bray
Ann Bartlett
Ann Bandler
Janet Bradley
Calaine M. Balduf
Nancy Berla
Barbara Burstein -
Virginia Bender
Doris Berland
Jessie Campbell
Bob Chierinski
Tom Case

Myra Cohen
Margaret Copple
Lee B. Copple
Carol Croak
Carol Castator
Dorothy Curtis
Mary Cross
Janet Currie
Mary Cyms
Donald J. Cash
Ralph E. Canfield

Ronald De Bouver
Daniel Lee DeGraaf
Jane Ditto
Tula Diamond
Peter De Janosi
Dorothy Davis
Barbara L. Dowd
Cynthia Diamond
Lois Engler
Marjorie Fairman
Elise Fiber
Bonnie Gokenbach
Cynthia Gibbs
Beverly Ginsberg
Martha Green
Elizabeth Garland
Bruce B. Graden
Evelyn C. Graden
Elaine Gulden
Arline Gottesman
Marion Gross
Charles W. Huggy
Norma Jean Hyma
John Hyma Jr.
Richard J. Heiman
Florence Huizenga
Dorothea Hinderer
Frances Hoskins -
Gretchen Hahn
Adele Huebner
Joan Hyman
Carolyn Hartman
William Himelhoch
Mary Hackney
Rita Isbitts
F. Wallace Jeffries
James T. Johnston
Tamra Johns
F. F. Jobsis
F. F. Jobsis
Sydney S. Kripke
Mannie Krashin
Edward Kahn
Sally Kornwise
Cynthia Kras
Cornelius D. Korhorn
Honora Kornberg
Kennie Keim
Robert Kuehn
James Labes
Klaus N. Liepelt
Anne Lawther
Joyce Leonhard
Melba Abril Lamarque
Phyllis Lee Lattner
Robert Licht
Sally Lorbor
Phyllis Lipsky_
Ray B. Marglous
Jim Magary
George Mack
Barbara Mattison
Renee Mann
Joyce Miyamoto
Meredyth Manns
Janis E Magulis
Patricia Mallett
Mary Miserez
Carole Micheles
Jenne E. Marani
Janet Mason
Pat Newell
Mary Joan McCabe
Priscilla McClay
Douglas McLennan
J. Francis Ogozalek
Sue Orsborn
Eileen Patis
Lynn Putney
Helen Poterala
James Rasbach
Carol Rush
M. Jawap Ridna
Frances Reitz
Bette Jean Robinson
Eleanore Rosenthal
Thomas J. Reigel Jr.
Ann Roden
Sharon Rich
Esther E. Reigel
Edith Risman
Mary Richards
Sylvia J. Rudolph
Anabel Reese
Ralph Smith
Alexander Sarke
Lawrence Scott
Barbara Sklar
Ruth Skentlebury
Betsey Sherrer
Eleanore Swope
Ruth Speelberg
Janet Stolakavski
Mary G. Spaulding
Nancie L. Solien
Joyce Shadford
Martha Seger
Doris Ann Soule
Isabel Simms
Ruth Straus
Mary -Katherine Sloan
Diana Styler
David Wilson Taylor
Louise Tate
Robert Teeters
Nancy Teeters
Margaret Takagi
Francis J. Uptown
Thomas Victor
Cynthia Vary
Edwin Von Boeventer
Henry Van Dyke
M. Joan Von Hoene
Ronald E. West
Patricia Wright
Robert Whealey
Helen 'Whitaker
Frank M. Wheeler

Sarah Weed
Helen Wong
Anne Woodard
Phyllis Willar
Ann Weaver
Patricia Winney
Lynn Zimmerman
Norman A. Zilber
Robert J. Wollam
Betty J. Wollam

Lectures
Lecture series on The Earth's At-
mosphere by Sydney Chapman of Ox-
ford University, Visiting Professor of
Solar and Terrestrial Physics, will be-
gin Tues., Sept. 29, 4 p.m., 1400 Chem-
istry; the first lecture topic, "The Lu-
nar Tide in the Earths Atmosphere."
This is the first of a weekly series spon-
sored by the Departments of Astron-
omy, Aeronautical Engineering, Phys-1
ics, and Geology.
University Lecture, auspices of the
School of Education, "The Centralized
System of Education in the Australian
Democracy," Dr. George Browne, Dean
of theSchool of Education, University1
of Melbourne,t Wed., Sept. 30, 4:15 pm..f
Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
Academic Notices
Geometry Seminar, Tues., Sept. 29,
4:30 p.m., 3001 Angell Hall. Mr. W. Al-t
Dhahir will speak on "Commutativity1
of Three-space."
Orientation Seminar, in Mathematics.
First meeting for beginning graduate
students will be held on Tues., Sept.
29, at 2 p.m., 3001 Angell Hall.
Make-up Examinations in History.
Sat., Oct. 10, 9-12 noon, 2413 M.H. See
your instructor for permission and
then sign list in History Office.
Student Health Lectures - Elective.
Open to all students. Suitable for old
students deficient in former freshmen
requirement.,Required lectures not giv-
en to new students this semester.
Natural Science Auditorium. Repeat-
ed 3, 4, 5, and 7:30 p.m.
Lecture Numbers and Dates
No. 1 Tuesday, Sept. 29; No. 2 Thurs.,
Oct. 1: No. 3 Tues., Oct. 6; No. 4 Thurs.,
Oct. 8; No. 5 Tues., Oct. 13; No. 6!
Thurs., Oct. 15.
Engineering Mechanics Seminar. The1
first meeting of the Engineering Mech-
anics Seminar will be held in 101 West
Engineering, from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m.
on Wed., Sept. 30. Professor J. Ormon-
droyd will speak on "The Importance
of Kinematics in Mechanics." Refresh-
ments will be served.

ROTC Plan,
Meets Little
opposition
Student feeling to the Air Force
ROTC's newly modified policy, in-
troduced this summer to gear the
ROTC program with the active
duty and combat crew require-
ments of the U. S. Air Force, was
generally "the Air Force Knows
best."
Most students interviewed sub-
scribed to the idea of the Air Force
cutting back in some of their com-
missioned officer needs in certain
fields if the move was designed as
a sincere economy measure.
THE NEW program stemmed
partly as the result of the reduc-
tion in the projected size of the
Air Force from 143 to 120 wings
and the resulting lowered man-
power authorizations.
Under the new program men
entering this year's senior class
were allowed to continue under
contract but were divided into
two groups; those desiring and
able to take the flight training
candidates program and those
others not in the flight training
program.
Ninety five seniors entered this
year's senior class and although
specific figures are not yet avail-
able as to how many are in the
flight training candidates pro-
gram, it is known that the cadets
will be divided into three cate-
gories, flyers, technical students,
and non technical students.
THOSE IN flight training will
receive commissions upon gradua-
tion as will a certain percentage
of technical students. All others
will receive certificates of comple-
tion.
Tom Lepold, '55 LS&A, who
might have continued as an in-
formal student in advanced
ROTC this year summed up the
feelings of many of the students
effected when he said that by
giving the students an option
the Air Force ROTC was being
as fair as they could.
Although a lot of men felt that
the informal program had little to
offer and left the program rather
than put in valuable time, those
who did leave felt like Al Mann,
'55, who didn't consider two years
in the ROTC a waste of time.
The Air Force ROTC also ad-
mitted 192 juniors to the advanc-
ed program during the year with
93 signed up for flight training.
Eighteen of the 192 were engi-
neering students, 22 were in the
observers category, 30 were on
the informal program
Those on the informal list may
become formal if the quotas are
raised. A small number of men on
the informal list will be able to
get commissions if the needs of
the Air Force require

Commander
Gives Rank
2
For Office
WASHINGTON-(/P)-At 10:17
a.m. yesterday the way was cleared M
for Cmdr. Herman MacGolrick
Kennickell of the U. S. Navy toH
drop down to a mere lieutenant CLASS
j.g.
Kennickell wanted it that way. LINES
So, with the Rt. Rev. Angus 2
Dun, Episcopal bishop of Wash- 3
ington, conducting the services in 4
St. John's Episcopal church across Figure,
from the White House, Kennickell Classif
was ordained a priest.
* * *
UP STEPPED Rear Adm. Ed- LO
ward Harp, chief of the Navy's LOST-Im
chaplains, to welcome him into on Fri.o
the chaplains corps and hand him ArnoldI
the shoulder boards that showed BLACK P.
he now would be Lt. (j.g.) Ken- day on
nickell 3-1561,I
Navy historians say they be- LOST-I.
NavyPhoneE
lieve it's the first time a full
commander ever dropped down
to start all over as a chaplain. SMALL W
.One Ia:
Kennickell, of Savannah, Ga., is large d;
a cheerful 32-year-old father of uphoist
three who has been a Navy man walnut
since he was 20. $25. On
* * * nut ve
small st
HE SAW service on a, mine- davenp
sweeper at Okinawa and Iwo Jima, Largec
and came out of the Navy, briefly, Phone2
in 1945 as a lieutenant command- ARMY-NA
er. Eight months later he was back 39c; sh
in, serving as inspector-instruc- Sam's s
tor and officer in charge of Navy YOUNGI
training centers in Winston-Salem, singing
N. C., Spartanburg, S. C., and cages.5
Greenville, S. C. 1952 CHE
A nice life, that, but all the radio a
t "Mac" Kennickell was tion. V
time recorda
thinking about chucking it all p.m. M
for the ministry. ----- -
KRANICH
In 1951 he took the big plunge. Size M.
He went on inactive duty, and en-
rolled in the Virginia Theological
Seminary in Alexandria, Va. By 8
going to school summers at the
Union Theological Seminary he 9
managed to cram three years' work Phone
into two.6
SLIDERU
HOW MUCH of a financial drop and Ch
would his new job be? flexible
"Well, a commander makes BLOND M
around $2,500 a year more than conditi
I'll make. 1937 DOD
"But let's look at it this way. fer; ph
When my wife is asked how she EVERGR
will like getting along on a lieu- Pyrami
tenant's pay, she always says, 'It'll Spread]
bd like a million dollars.' Dwarfb
Also B
"You see, for the past two years Call Mi
we've been struggling along on 4100 Ch
GI school pay. Every month that CONTAX
$120 just came rolling in. automa
"My wife worked part time, we
got some aid from the Episcopal ZENITH
church, and someway we made phono.
lout okay." 3-0521,1

ICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
IFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
.60 1.34 1.96
.70 1.78 2.94
.90 2.24 .3.92
5 average words to a line.
fed deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
)ST AND FOUND

FOR SALE
HIGH FIDELITY portable 3 speed phon-
ograph with microphone. Dirt cheap.
3-0521, Ext. 835. )43B
1950 CROSLEY CONVERTIBLE-14,600
miles, excellent condition. $400. Ph.
3-2370 after 6 p.m. )42B
FIFTY CLASSICAL LP's at one half
price or less. Ph. 2-9185. )41B
FOR RENT

npt. papers clipped together;
or Sat. Reward. Phone 2-5117.
Knepfer. )3A
ARKER "51." Lost noon Thurs-
Diag. Cali Marilyn Rippie,
Ext. 6545 Lloyd. 5A
D. bracelet: "Ellen". Reward.
Ellen Brown, 398 Jordan. )6A
FOR SALE
WALNUT GATELEG table, $35.
rge oak sideboard, $5.00. One
ouble coil springs, $15.00. One
ered chair, $1.00. One large
veneer table and five chairs,
e wool rug, $65. Two large wal-
neer buffets, $15 each. One
teel folding "cot, $10.00. Large
ort with green leatherette, $12.
childs coaster wagon, $4.00.
2-9020. )13B
AVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
ports, 69c; military supplies.
tore, 122 E. Washington. )14B
BUDGIES or Parakeets, also
canaries, bird supplies and
562 S. 7th, Ph. 3-5330. )15B
VROLET - Black four door,
and heater. Excellent condi-
Very clean. Complete service
available. Call 2-3246, 8 to 5
onday thru Friday. )20B
H AND BACH Grand Piano.
$300. Phone 9039. )17B
TIME
sios. - $2 - (6c ea.)
LIFE
mos. - $3 - (Sc ea.)
Student Periodical Agency
6007 days, 25-7843 eves. )1B
LES-K. & E. log log duplex
emist's, with magnifiers; 24 in.
curve. 3L0346, )27B
MOUTON FUR COAT. Excellent
on. Call 2-4194. )33B
DGE. Good condition. Best of-
one 2-8753. )35B
EENS: at wholesale
Juniper ........,. $2.50 to $7.50
dal Arbor Vitae .. $2.0 to $5.00
ing Yew...........$2.25 to $4.50
Mugho Pine...... $2.50 to $4.00
lue Spruce, hemlock, fir, etc.
Michael Lee 8-574 or see me
hem. Bldg. afternoons. )36B
III, Sonnar F:2 or Rolleifiex
atic tessar 3.5. Evenings 2-8616.
)30B

TWO NICE DRY basement rooms for
men (one sleeping and one study.)
Twin beds. Low rent, some apt. priv-
ileges. 508 Monroe. )Cl
BACHELOR GIRL Apt. New kitchens
and tile baths. Call at 305 E. Liberty
or phone 3-5062. )C3
LARGE attractive newly decorated first
floor furnished apt, with basement.
Heat and water included. Fireplace
and baby grand. Spacious grounds.
Ideal for couple or single men. Call
25-7006. 2223 S. Main. )5C
TWO ROOM SUITE with cooking facili-
ties. Very close to campus. Phone
2-8606. )6C
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Reserve rooms now for Football Week-
ends. Rooms by Day or Week. Campus
Tourist Homes. Ph. 3-8454. 518 E.
Williams St. (near State) )3D
CAMPUS-Rooms for men with cooking
privileges. Prefer Graduate students.
Inquire 518 E. William St., 3-8454. )2D
BOARD in Michigan Co-op House, 315
N. State. Three meals a day at ap-
proximately $8 per week. Contact
George Queely or Roald Shern, 6284.
)5E
ROOM AND BOARD
MICHIGAN CO-OP, 315 N. State, has
several room vacancies in a four
man study room with adjacent bed-
room at $12.50 per week for room and
board. Contact George Queely or
Roald Shern 6284. )4E
LARGE front room for rent near cam-
pus, one or two students, call 3-8490,
)4D
PERSONAL
Na $$DOWN
Don't pay cash for any magazine sub-
scription! Our representatives ask
you to pay only after you have re-
ceived your first copy. Order now;
pay later. Magazines are our only
business. WeLspecialize in student
specials to Life, Time, Sat. Evening
Post, US News, Colliers, etc. Phone
6007 daily; 25-7843 eves. Student Pe-
riodical Agency. )2F
SPECIAL STUDENT SUBS
Colliers..............$3 (7'c ea.)
Life.......................$3 (8c ea.)
Sat. Eve. Post....... .$3.50 (10c ea.)
Time..............,....$2 (6c ea.)
U.S. News............. $3.25 (7%c ea.)
Subscribe Now - Pay Later
Phone Student Periodical Agency
6007 days, 25-7843 eves. )4F

HELP WANTED
"COLLEGE MEN AND WOMEN"-Want-
ed for quick earnings in your neigh-
borhood! Full time, part time,+ or
spare time sales! Any age! Any hours!
Big profits! Repeat sales$ Guaranteed
product! Make as high as $10 in one
hour. Contact Mr. James Barker, 326
South Otsego, Jackson, Michigan, or
phone 2-9319. WRITE -- PHONE OR
VISIT. )1H
WANTED-Student to sell house-party
favors to fraternities and sororities.
Write, L & L Party Favors, 505 Union
Bldg. Bloomington, Indiana. )15H
WANTED-Michigan Daily carriers. Ex-
cellent pay. Morning hours. Call Cir-
culation Dept., 2-3241.
MALE GRAD preferred with mornings
or afternoons available. Some heavy
work.- Drivers license necessary. Ed-
wards Letter Shop. 17H
BUSINESS SERVICES
VOICE LESSONS-Call David Murray,
graduate voice major. Ph. 2-7036 be-
tween 6-7 p.m. )9I
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales and service.
MORRILLS
314 S. State St., Phone 7177

x;

RADIO SERVICE
Auto -Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
11,' blocks east of East Eng.

)5

Philosophy 63 Make-up Final.
30. from 2-5 p.m. in 2401 M.H.

Sept.

Sociology Colloquium. The Student-
Faculty Committee of the Sociology
Department will present the first in a
series of Colloquia on Wed,, Sept. 30, at
4 p.m., West Conference Room, Rack-
ham Building. Mr. John Aird, who has
just returned from a year of teachingI
and research in Pakistan, will discuss
"People and Problems in East Bengal."
Everyone is cordially invited to attend.
The University Extension Service an-
nounces that enrollment may still be
made in the following classes which
open this evening:
Social Psychology. Concerned with the
various ways in which social forces,
have influence over the behavior of the
individual. The processes of human
interaction are examined with refer-
ence to personality development, psy-
chological maladjustment, attitude for-
mation and change, and problems of
group conflict, Special attention will
be given to the social psychological
analysis of such significant contem-
porary problems as racial prejudice, in-
ternational tensions, public morale, and
the psychology of crisis. The general
framework of the course is a theoreti-
cal system which utilizes the contri-
butions of both psychological and so-
ciological science. Prerequisite if taken
for credit: Psychology 31E or Sociology
51. (Psychology 62 or Sociology 62, two
hours of undergraduate credit.) $18.00.
Instructor: Milton J. Rosenberg.
Activities for Leisure Years, II. De-
signed to furnish experience in many
activities older people enjoy in leisure
time. The activities selected will be
adapted to the wishes of the group.
Among those available will be basket
(Continued on Page 4)
READ

WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-
up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )2I
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN; Voice
Development in singing and speak-
ing. Member research commitee;
Nat'l. Assoc. Teachers of Singing Di-
rector, Walden Woods Voice Confer-
ence, Author of Emergent Voice. Stu-
dio, 715 Granger; phone 6584. )101
JEWELRY'
fj ~ Fe have just
received a
S new assortment
O of jewelry direct
from INDIA.
o w9ft4W/Apt £ih~p0
330 Maynard
0

-

4

II

table model radio, 4 speed
Blond leatherette, $69.50. Cali
6810 Gomberg, SQ. )38B

PIANO INSTRUCTION - Don-David
Lusterman is now accepting students
for the new school year. Phone 6719.
)3F

5

tor- AinSV as piel

.

Ending Tonight
Coor:

11 S

o entry blaks
No box tops!

You can cIi~ I
~'N againl and again1
C'mon, let's go!

Return mo

s

TWICE AS MANY AWARDS THIS YEAR

AND
USE
DAILY
CLASS IFI EDS

F1d k the
TECHNICOLOR
Released i UNITED ARTISTS
BARBARA
S STAN WYCK
I "Alt I Desire"

A

WRITE A LUCKY STRIKE JINGLE
based on the fact that LUCKIES TASTE BETTER!*

ii

ii

{

n towns to parts unknown
ro m t -an ow lace you go -
wth people.ithe.lnOW

Dixie Eats at
Red's Rite Spot

FIRST LESSON FREE
HORT HANTONIGHT AT 7
in WEEKS Sd W
TYPING OPTIONALR
Over 300 Schools in U.S. will assist you in review or placement,
Uses ABCs Nights 12 to 16 Weeks.
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Founded 1915 Phone 7831 State & Williams Sts.

Easiest $25 you ever made. Sit right
'down and write a 4-line jingle based on
the fact that Luckies taste better.
That's all there is to it. More awards
than ever beforel
Read the jingles on this page. Write
original ones just like them-or better!
Write as many as you want. There's
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to use it, together with your name, in
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Remember: Read all the rules and
tips carefully. To be on the safe side,
clip them out and keep them handy.
Act now. Get started today.

~yeats, 'folks say, are 44avotful'.
-Mhemfre seasoned per 1 etl'
F ette-r tast.e, its LckiSSDbOUh
-That Win the che~8" iS

a:

11

--- I

I

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Prices This Attraction Only
Matinees 60c Eyes & Sun. 80c
"May be the Best Picture
of all time.--Times t

... plays out of the ordinary"-N.Y. MORNING TELEGRAPH
fr . . programs unusually rewarding"--MCHIGAN DAILY
reestablished . ., . as an institution in the conmnunity"
-ANN ARBOR NEWS
THE ARTS THEATRE
2091/ E. Washington Phone 7301
Memberships now on sale at Bob Marshall's Book Store,
Wahr's Book Store, The Music Center, and the Club

}sA l'wYWY .. . ...
r

------'"CLIP OUT THIS INFORMATION --"

RULES

1. Write your Lucky Strike jingle on a plain piece
of paper or post card and send it to Happy-Go-Lucky,
P. O. Box 67, New York 46, N.Y. Be sure that your
name, adresole1e sand class are include--and

*TIPS
To earn an award you are not limited to
"Luckies taste better." Use any other sales
points on Lucky Strike, such as the fol-
louina:

. i,
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-1

I1

I I

I

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>

I

1

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