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September 27, 1953 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-27

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE ThEE

/Vuseum Announces Fall Program;
Opening Features Swedish Textiles

I

Opening with a Swedish textiles
show, the University Museum will
present a varied schedule of ex-
hibits this fall with painting,
crafts, architecture, graphic arts,
photographs and sculpture featur-
ed during the next months.
Highlight of the autumn season
is an exhibit of 33 contemporary
, American oils and watercolors
from the collection of Mr. and
Mrs., Lawrence Fleischman of De-
troit.
It will be shown from November
15 to December 6.
ARRANGED BY Prof. Jean Paul
Slusser of the architecture and
design college, the Museum's di-
rector, the series will be exhibited
in the galleries on the second floor
of Alumni Memorial Hall.
Running through October 15
the Swedish textiles display in-
cludes wall hangings, rugs, fur-
niture and drapery fabrics,
printed materials, embroideries
and tweeds.
Many of the fabrics show the
Swedish flair in contemporary de-'
sign.
The exhibit is sponsored by the
Traveling Exhibition Service, Na-
tional Collection of Fine Arts,
Smithsonian Institution.
S* *
FOUR OTHER special exhibits
are scheduled for October.
A . United States premiere
showing of Eskimo carvings from
Baffin Land assembled by the
Canadian government will be
featured beginning Sunday, Oct.
4 and extending through Oct. 25.
During the same time a group
of original French art posters by
such moderns as Matisse, Picasso'
and Braque will be .exhibited.
- Another special show, "Purcell
and Elmslie, Architects," will run
from Oct. 18 to Nov. 8.

E * * *

Magazine Page
With a preliminary article on
the fall activities of the Uni-
versity Museum and a record
review, The Daily inaugurates
a special Sunday feature which
in the next weeks will develop
into a full-scale magazine page.
Local art, theater and musi-
cal events will be announced
and reviewed. Notes and com-
ment on new books and records
will also be included from time
to time. The project is intend-
ed.to give fuller and more uni-
fied coverage to the numerous
cultural interests and activities
of the campus.

19,,53 Casals Festival Recorded-

NEW RELEASES REVIEWED:

Arts

Group

-Daily-Don Campbell
SWEDISH .TEXTILES-A colorful rug designed by Sofia Widen
forms part of the textile exhibit now featured at the Museum.
In the foreground is a bronze sculpture, "Pre-Adamic Fruit,"
by Jean Arp.

Gives IBreak
To Children
Having added folk sings, art ex-
hibits, and play discussions to
their roster in the past two years,
the Arts Theater Club, Ann Arbor's
only professional theater, has de-
cided to give the children a break.
Beginning Saturday, October 10,
the Club will sponsor classes in
creative dance and acting for
children of all age groups. The
Club will also continue the Chil-
dren's Theater which last year of-
fered four productions with all-
junior casts.
* * *
GERALDINE MILLER, experi-
enced teacher and one-time stu-
dent of Martha Graham, will con-
duct the creative dance classes
which will be held on Saturday
mornings and Monday afternoons.
Miss Miller did choreography
for several past Arts Theater
plays including the unusual
dance production of Ibsen's "Lit -
tle Eyolf."
Acting for children will be
taught on Saturday mornings by
Teresa Hughes, Arts Theater Club
actress and formerly director and
teacher of children's theater
groups in Detroit and Baltimore.
Registration for both classes will
take place on Saturday, October 3,
Club, 209%/ E. Washington.
at 10 a.m. when prospective stu-
dents will be able to sign up. at the

By DONALD HARRIS
Each year now for the past
three, Columbia Records has jour-
neyed to southern France, to the
small, secluded mountain villages
on the border-line between France
and Spain, and recorded all the
performances of the Casals Festi-
val.
Since the thirties when Franco
assumed absolute dictatorship in
his native Spain, Casals has been
living in self-imposed exile in a
monastery at Prades.
The past three years, however,
he has in the summer forsaken
his hermitic existence, and led a
Festival featuring the world's most
celebrated artists.
THIS YEAR the Festival was
devoted to Schubert, Schumann,
and Brahms. The list of artists in-
cludes violinists Isaac Stern, Jos-
eph Szigeti, and Alexander Schnei-
der; pianists, Myra Hess, Eugene
Istomin, Leopold Mannes, Mieczy-
slaw Horszowski; cellists, Casals,
Paul Tortelier, Madeline Foley;
violists, Milton Katims, Milton
Thomas; flutist, John Wummer.
The works played are Brahms;
Sextet No. 1 in B-flat major,
Quintet No. 2 in G major, Quar-
tet No. 3 in C Minor for piano
and strings, Trio No. 1 in B Ma-
jor, and Trio No. 2 in C Major;
Schubert; Quintet in C Major,
Trio No. 1 in B-flat Major, Trio
No. 2 in E-flat Major, Sonata
No. 5 for violin and piano, Var-
iations on "Trock'ne Blumen"
and "Die Schone Mullerin" for
flute and piano; Schumann;
Quintet in. E-flat major for
piano and strings, Funf Stuke
Im Volkstan for cello and piano,
Trio No. 1.in D minor.
All the works seem to describe
what is memorable in chamber
music of the romantic period, post-
Bethoven and pre-twentieth cen-
tury. It would be impossible to
even begin commenting on the dif-
ferent performances individually;
there are 10 records in all.
The list of artists automatically
bespeaks technical excellence. No
performance can be called re-
strained; none are in bad taste.

IT IS REDUNDANT to use su-
perlatives; a performance such as
the Brahms first Trio with Stern,
Casals, and Hess, sounds exactly
like what one would expect from
such people, beautifully wrought,
carefully planned, and enthusias-
tically presented.
At the present time Columbia
is only issuing the records in a
very expensive limited edition
series, with the main issue for
public consumption, without the
fancy album and trimmings, due
in November. If you buy the
limited edition album, you get
a bonus records and some pho-
tograph thrown in besides cele-
brating the fifth anniversary of
LP.

Mercury Records' recent long-
play release of Serenade for Clar-
inet and Strings by Prof. Homer
Keller of the music school will be
of considerable interest to local
collectors who know Prof. Keller's
music only from his late efforts
that have been performed here-
abouts.%
The Serenade written during
Prof. Keller's student days, is
quite a change from his recent of-
ferings like last year's Viola So-
nata, but it would be wrong ,to cast
off this romantic student work as
unworthy of serious listening as
it has its own expressivity and
charm.
The influences on the work
seem to be Debussy, Delius, and

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the impressionistic composers,
not so much in sounding like
them as using their methods. It
is a rhapsodic piece, slow, al-
most ready to jump into a film
or story. The harmonies are
richly colored with the solo
clarinet intensely singing above
them or softly sounding below
them.
The performance is by,the East-
man-Rochester Symphony Orches-
tra, conducted by Howard Hanson.
Part of a series entitled Americana,
it is performed along with works
by Copland, Bernard Rogers, Han-
son, Kent Kennan, and Wayne
Barlow. All the works are for solo
winds and string orchestra.

* * *
The architectural dub achieved
fame during the early decades of
the 19th century and are credited
with important developments in
modern architecture.
FROM THE House of Heyden-
ryk in New York comes a feature
"Framing-Right and Wrong" on
display from Oct. 30 to Nov. 20 il-
lustrating points on good and bad
framing techniques.
Along with the Fleischman.

iju like the ,fejt
Come in and look over out'-
Elgin, Hamilton and Swiss watches
Precious and semi-precious rings
Kreisler and Speidel bands

* * *
collection, November at the Mu-
seum will see displays by Uni-
versity artists and a compre-
hensive print collection of Pi-
casso work.
Local artists are featured in the
Michigan Printmakers Society
show from Nov. 1 to 18. The so-
ciety was recently formed here by
Prof. Emil Weddige of the archi-
tecture and design school and
Richard Davis, Grad.
Prof. Weddige spent much of
last year abroad and his litho-
graphs are included in several im-
portant collections.
ASSEMBLED by the Museum of
Modern Art, the Picasso show
numbers about 60 prints covering
50 years of the famed modern's
work, and will be shown from Nov.
29 to December 20.
December's offering will be
"Memorable Life Photographs,"
to be shown from Dec. 10 to 30.
In the past the Museum has
brought many interesting and im-
portant exhibits to Ann Arbor.
Last year a comprehensive Ja-
panese collection was a highlight
of the season, and several years
ago a show of complete furnishings
for a contemporary home caused
considerable interest.
In addition, the Museum aug-
ments special shows with exhibits
from its permanent collection ran-
ging from Renaissance paintings
to modern sculpture, painting and
drawings.

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