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September 25, 1953 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1953-09-25

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PAGE TW

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1953

.-_____________________________________-_______-

ATMOSPHERE EXPERT:
Oxford Astronomer To Lecture Here

By DEBRA DURCHSLAG
Fingering his horn - rimmed
glasses, Prof. Sydney Chapman,
Fellow of Queen's College, Oxford,
sat on the observatory steps, smil-
ed engagingly and talked about
sports, England and astronomy.
Prof. Chapman, in a manner as
English as his speech, joked about
his accent and 'proved himself a
most personable astronomer. De-
spite his formidable title here as
visiting professor of solar and ter-
restrial physics, Prof. Chapman is
a very human scientist.
* * *
HE SWIMS half a mile everyday
at the Intramural Bldg., reads
widely and is interested in a great
number of things besides astron-
omy.
In his official capacity, however,
Prof., Chapman will be giving a
series of twelve lectures dealing
with the earth's atmosphere, its
magnetism and the Aurora Polaris.
These lectures are sponsored by
the departments of astronomy,
aeronautical engineering, physics
and geology.
His first lecture will cover
"The Lunar Tide in the Earth's
Atmosphere," to be held at 4 p.m.
Tuesday in 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
Prof. Chapman will spend three
months at the University and
leave in the middle of December
to take up his professorship of
geophysics at the University of
Alaska.
The professor will fly to Fair-
banks, Alaska, remain thereafor
3 months and then travel to New
York University. But for a man ac-
customed to bicycling from Ox-
ford to Paris, this is all in a year's
work.
Radulovieb
Pledged Aid
By Senator
(Continued from Page 1)

Daily-Lon Qui
PROF. SYDNEY CHAPMAN

SL Books-
Student Legislature's book-
exchangestaff reported yester-
day that more than $5,700 had
been transacted in bookstore
operations to date, the largest
amount collected in any single
season.
Checks and unsold books will
be returned to students upon
presentation of receipts be-
tween 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday in the
League Lobby.
Game Tickets
To Be Resold
Non-student tickets for the
Michigan-University of Washing-
ton football game turned in from
3 to 5 p.m. today in the Union stu-
dent offices will be resold from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow in the
Union lobby.
Priced at face value, the tickets
will be sold on a first-come, first-
served basis, according to Union
staffman Bernard Levine, '56. No
orders will be taken in advance,1
he emphasized.
The resale program will be in
effect during every home game.

ESA Honors
Requirements
Dip to_3.2
A change in the literary college
honors requirement now will make
it possible for the senior with a 3.2
average to graduate with honors.
Previously, all students attaining
a 3.5 average were graduated "with
distinction." Now the faculty may
recommend that students with a
3.2 be graduated "with distinction"
and those attaining a 3.6 "with
high distinction."
"With honors" and "with high'
honors" will be inscribed on the
diplomas of students nominated
for these awards by the appropri-
ate department or degree program
for showing exceptional ability in
their field of concentration.
Fifty-eight hours of credit must
be completed here to be eligible for
honors, with awards made on the
basis of work done here.
Service Group
Elects Officers
DougBailey was elected vice
president and -Ray Maginn, re-
cording secretary in elections held
last night at the Union by Alpha
I Phi Omega service fraternity.

ADA Finds
Dixie Dems
'Beat' GOP
A Northern Republican senator
rates even lower than a Southern
Democrat according to a calcula-
tion taken by statisticians working
for Americans for Democratic Ac-
tion.
By studying the "perfect" sena-
tor's voting record-by ADA stan-
dards-the statisticians have de-
cided the conservative Republican
is exactly 14 percent worse than
his Democratic counterpart.
* * *
AN ORGANIZATION which
supported both the New Deal and
the Fair Deal, the ADA discovered
the average Republican senator's
vote coincided with its own stan-
dards only 26.4 per cent of the
time while independent-minded
Southern Democrat chalked up an
average of 40.4 per cent.
In Michigan's tally Senator
Ferguson took the ninth place
in Republican Liberalism rolling
up coinciding positions with the
ADA 40 per cent of the time.
The Junior senator from Michi-
gan, Charles Potter came in a
poor 33rd as a liberal republican.
with "rigt" juigments only 14
per cent of the time. '
TheADA agrees with, the Mich-
igan Senators' decisions only twice
-in their support of the nomina-
tion of Charles Bohlen as am-
bassador to Russia and their op-
position to the cut of a billion
dollars from the President's for-
eign aid program.
* * *
FERGUSON received ADA's ap-
proval on four other questions; his
stand on tidelands oil, the position
he took with regard to the $43,-
200,000 in subsidies awarded to
private ship owners, his support
of the admission of more Italians
under the refugee immigration act
and his opposition to the bill re-
ducing aid to countries dealing
with Red China.
On nine other test issues, the
Michigan senators voted opposite
to ADA standards.
Seven Democratic senators
were given a blank "perfect" ti-
tle having voted in accord with
the ADA on every issue. These
included Senators Lehman of
New York, Humphrey of Min-
nesota, Douglas of Illinois, Mur-
ray of Montana, Kilgore and
Neely of West Virginia, and
Jackson of Washington.
Republican Senators Hicken-
looper of Iowa, Welker of Idaho
and McCarthy of Wisconsin were
found to be in complete and ut-
ter disagreement with ADA prin-
ciples never having voted in ac-
cordance with the organization.
'U' Doctors Study
Radioisotope Uses
Four medical school doctors are
in Oak Ridge, Tenn., where they
are studying techniques of using
radioisotopes in medicine.
Dr. Jere M. Bauer, professor of
internal medicine; Dr. Robert W.
Buxton, professor of surgery, and
Dr. Paul E. Hodgson and Dr. A.
Burgess Vial, instructors in sur-
gery, are enrolled in the two week
course.
Photographers

Anyone interested in photog-
raphy may attend the staff meet-
ing at 4:30 p.m. today in the
'Ensian office of the Student Pub-
lications Bldg.
'Ensian photographers cover

I

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES

LIN
F
C

NES
2
3
4

1 DAY
.60
.70
.90

3 DAYS
1.34
1.78
2.24

6 DAYS
1.96
2.94
3.92

igure 5 average words to a line.
"assified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST. Green wallet containing import-
ant papers. Phone 2-1517. )1A
LOST-Impt. papers clipped together;
on Fri. or Sat. Reward. Phone 2-5117.
Arnold Knepfer. )3A
LOST-Shell rimmed glasses in brown
case. Ph. 2-6514. )2A
FOR SALE
SMALL WALNUT GATELEG table, $35.
One large oak sideboard, $5.00. One
large double coil springs, $15.00. One
upholstered chair, $1.00. One large
walnut veneer table and five chairs,
$25. One wool rug, $65. Two large wal-

--

Prof. Preston W. Slosson of thej
history department indicated the
incident, was "more like what the
Russians do when they arrest an
entire family."
A member of the Law School
said the military had an "ade-
quate" case for dismissing Radu-
lovich.
"Radulovich's real hope lies in
a fair hearing," the law professor
commented.
Earlier yesterday, Radulovich's
sister, Mrs. Margaret Fishman,
declined to answer questions
about her political affiliations.
Mrs. Fishman has been accused
of attending a "social gathering"
of the Youth Labor League and
other allegedly Communist domi-
nated activities.
The charges against Radulo-
vich's father are that he sub-
scribed to a pro-Soviet Serbian
newspaper and received copies of
the Daily Worker.
s *
IN DENYING his supposed Com-
munist affiliations, John Radulo-
vich said "I am not a Communist
and I never was a Communist. I
am a Democrat and I don't even
mind Mr. Eisenhower's govern-
ment."
Answering his accusers fur-
ther, the Serbian-born factory
worker went on, "I read a Ser-
bian paper, Free World. It was
a good democratic paper dur-
ing the war. Afterwards it was
called subversive and I stopped
reading it. But I also read an-
other Serbian paper, which was
pro-Monarchist," he said.
Sanborn, one of the young stu-
dent's lawyers told The Daily he
"plans on going to the hearing,
finding out the evidence against
Radulovich and then decide what

nut veneer buffets, $15 each., One
small steel folding cot, $10.00. Large
davenport with green leatherette, $12.
Large chiids coaster wagon, $4.00.
Phone 2-9020. )13B
HARDLY WORN Canadian beaver fur
coat. Seven full strips, fashionable
cut. Owner moved south; sell at sac-
rifice. Phone 2-3541. )9B
LIGHTWEIGHT BICYCLES-$51.95 and
up, service on all makes of bicycles.
Kiddie Korner, 564 S. Main. Four
blocks from campus. )3B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
YOUNG BUDGIES or Parakeets, also
singing canaries, bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. 7th, Pb. 3-5330. )15B
1952 CHEVROLET - Black four door,
radio and heater. Excellent condi-
tion. Very clean. Complete service
record available. Call 2-3246, 8 to 5
p.m. Monday thru Friday. )20B
KRANICH AND BACH Grand Piano.
Size M. $300. Phone 9039. )17B
PING PONG TABLE, man's new club
bag, GE stove, walnut sectional book-
case, radios, electric lawnmower, 2-
section ladder. Phone 3-5696 after
5 p.m. )19B
NEW 29-foot Globemaster trailer. Price
$2750. Phone University Hospital, Ext.
231 on Monday thru Friday. 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. )22B
1948 AUSTIN-Rebuilt engine. Good
buy at $200. Call 2-6520 after 6:00.
) 26B
Now [~Iu~
6:30
55c
SINGIN', SWAYIN' and
FUNNIN'among the palmsi
Also "TITANIC"

FOR SALE
TIME
8 mos. -- $2-- (6c ea.)
LIFE
8 mos. - $3 - (8c ea.)
Phone Student Periodical Agency
6007 days, 25-7843 eves. )1B
SLIDERULES-K. & E. log log duplex
and Chemist's, with magnifiers; 24 in.
flexible curve. 3-0346. )27B
1948 PACKARD-In excellent condition.
$625. Henry Sills, 120 Ingalls. )21B
FOR SALE-'41 Olds, 2 dr.; '39 Ford,
2 dr.; $65, choice. 2383 Jackson. )28B
1941 BUICK-Good condition Sedanette,
2 new tires. $230. Call 3-2728 after
5:15. )34B
BLOND MOUTON FUR COAT. Excellent
condition. Call 2-4194. )33B
MOTORCYCLE-1949 matchless 500 cc
single. This machine is in perfect
condition throughout. Ph. 25-7722.
SALE-Steel desks, chairs, tables, bath
towels, dishes. Reasonable. 2-4898.
)31B
BAD FOOTBALL TICKETS? Top qual-
jty 8 power x 25 Zeiss binoculars; $30.
3-0521, ext. 673. )29B

FOR RENT
TWO NICE DRY basement rooms for
older men (one sleeping and one
study). Twin beds. Low rent, some
apt. privileges. 508 Monroe. )C1
WANTED-One or two medical students
to live in apartment. Cooking facili-
ties. Cali 2-1044 at 6. )2C
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS-Rooms for men with cooking
privileges. Prefer Graduate students.
Inquire 518 E. William St., 3-8454. )2D
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Reserve rooms now for Football Week-
ends. Rooms by Day or Week. Campus
Tourist Homes. Ph. 3-8454. 518 E.
Williams St. (near State) )3D
HALF OF DOUBLE ROOM with grad-
uate student, $6.50 a week. Phone
2-1465, 923 Alivia. )5D
MALE MUSIC STUDENT is interested
in finding roommate to share large
double room in home 5 minutes from
campus. Room is well furnished, con-
tains grand piano. Must see to ap-
preciate. 406 Packard. )7D
ROOMS for male students. Cooking
privileges. Phone 3-2661. )6D
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS to Flint Fri. afternoon return-
ing Sunday. Charles Kroll, 433 Wil-
liams. 2-4401. )2G

: D I .

TRANSPORTATION
NEED RIDE to Chicago and back this
weekend. Call Shirley Henin. 2-4045.
Preferably noon hour. )3G
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD for South-East campus area.
$2.10 per day. Three meals. Generous
refund policy. 1617 Washtenaw. Phone
3-2360. )1E
STILL A FEW room and board openings
at 1617 Washtenaw. Room $30 per
month. Free linen and porter service.
Board $2.10 per day for three meals.
Phone 3-2360. 12E
PERSONAL
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS - continue
your piano lessons at college with a
highly trained and experienced teach-
er. Beginners and advanced. Practice
facilities arranged. Phone 2-3541. )IOB
HELP WANTED
"COLLEGE MEN AND WOMEN"-Want-
ed for quick earnings in your neigh-
borhood I Full time, part time, or
spare time sales! Any age! Any houra!
Big profits! Repeat sales! Guaranteed
product! Make as high as $10 in one
hour. Contact Mr. James Barker, 326
South Otsego, Jackson, Michigan, or
phone 2-9319. WRITE - PHONE OR
VISIT. )lH
STUDENTS for part time work eve-
nings. Michigan Recreation. Michigan
Theatre Building. )2H
SHOE SALESMAN-Part time, experience
necessary, excellent pay. Apply Masts,
121 S. Main or call 2-6326. )6H
WANTED-Certified teacher to work in
private nursery school mornings. May
bring nursery age child. Ph.' 3-4066,
) 7H
MAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass., free .sample and details:
)8H
STUDENT KITCHEN HELP WANTED--
Contact house manager of Sigma Phi.
Ph. 3-4707. )11H
BABY SITTER 9:30-11:30 A.M. Mon.,
Wed., Friday, except holidays, for
semester. 3-5153.
GIRL needed; % day per week for light
housework. Good wages. Ph. 3-1259
eve. )12H
WANTED-Students able to work any
morning, afternoon, or Saturday's
throughout the balance'of the school
year. Apply at Nielsens Flower Shop,
1021 Maiden Lane. )13H
BUSINESS SERVICES
VOICE LESSONS-Call David Murray,
graduate voice major. Ph. 2-7036 be-
tween 6-7 p.m., )9I

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS!'Portable and Standard
for rent, sales and service.
MORRILLS
314 S. State St., Phone 7177
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and 'T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.+
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1' blocks east of East Eng. )5I
KIDDIE COUNTRY CLUB-State ap-
proved nursery school has 7 openings
for children 3, 4, or 5 years. Daily
program Monday thru Friday between
9:00 a.m. and 12 noon. Transporta-
tion provided. Ph. 3-4066. )7I
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-
up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )21
WANTED TO BUY
TWO ENGLISH BICYCLES wanted for
around $25 each. Ph. 3-4488. )2J
TICKETS --1-5, for Mich.-Mich; State
game. 3-0521, ext. 673. )1J
REAL ESTATE
HOME SITES on Huron River. Drive on
wooded area with beautiful view-5
miles west of Ann Arbor. Write Frank
J. Offer, 1710 Seyburn, Detroit, 14,
Mich. or call LO. 7-1495. )1O

4

READ
AND
USE
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

'i

Today and Saturday

Phone 3-5651
One of the Ten
year was chos
Fal Season att
NEW
YORK A

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations
Best Pictures of the
en to open the new
the Orpheunt Cinema!

i s IT!

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1953
VOL. LXIV, No. 4
Notices
General Library. On all Sundays dur-
ing the current academic year, begin-
ning September 27, the General Library
will be open from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Ser-
vice will be given in the Main Read-
ing Room, Periodical Reading Room,
and at the Circulation Desk. The Medi-
cal Library will not be open, but the
Medical Stack is accessible through the
Circulation Desk.
Study Halls will be closed, but books
needed for Sunday use may be re-
served by students on Saturday.
Holders of stack permits will have
access to the stacks and may witn
draw books. Other users of the Library
may return and renew books at the
Circulation Desk.
The Selective Service College Quali-
fication Test will be given here on
Thurs., Nov. 19. Application deadline
Nov. 2.
It is recommended that all 'men who
have not previously taken the test!
make application for it at Ann Arbor
Selective Service Board No. 85, 208 West
Washington. The Selective Service
Board willthen notify applicants of
time and place.
The result of this test is used by
your local draft board for determining
college deferment.
The test will be given again on April
22, 1954.
1953 Regents-Alumni Honor Award
Winners. Any winners who were unable
to attend the meeting Thursday even-

ing and who have not received their
dictionaries may apply for them at
Mr. Ivan Parker's office, 113 Admin-
istration Bldg., Mon., Sept. 28.
Co-operative Boarding Applications
are now being accepted. Three meals a
day are provided at approximately $8
per week. Apply in person, or write
Luther Buchele, 1017 Oakland, or phone
6872. Office hours, 1 to 5 p.m.
Personnel Interviews. The firm of
Skidmore-Owings-Merrill, construction
firm from New York City, is currently
in need of Civil Engineers and Archi-
tectural Engineers, either graduates or
undergraduates, for several months em-
ployment as pile-driving inspectors in
conjunction with the erection of the
new Ford Motor Company administra-
tion building in Dearborn. Students
currently in school may applyfor sec-
ond-shift work. Contact the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Administration
Building, or' call Extension 371 for fur-
ther information.d4
(Continued on Page 4)

I

spot news, feature
story assignments.

and picture

witnesses to get.
"We will ask for
to call in witnesses
not yet contacted
menbers.
"With Ferguson's

adjournment
but we have
any faculty
aid and the

help of the press, the people have
rallied to our defense," Sanborn
concluded.
Weaver Fills Post
Prof. Richard L. Weaver, of
the conservation department 'was
elected secretary of the Conserva-
tion Education Association at its
recent meeting at Purdue Univer-
sity.
A new professional organization,
the CEA is an outgrowth of the
National Committee on Policies in
Conservation Education.

i
1

Memberships Now On Sale
for our 1953-54 season
at Marshall's Book Store, Wahr's Book Store,
the Music Center, and
THE ARTS THEATER CLUB
2091/2 E. Washington ... Phone 7301
"A Professional Company - A Members' Theater"

Saturday and Sunday trom I :3 P.M.
Admission 60c incl. tax

Coming Sunday
GARY
COOPER
"RETURN TO PARADISE"

Choice recordings to whet your musical appetite!

RCA

VICTOR ai i;i1n 4RECORDS

Cinema SL fui/d

Irmingh
iHEAi RF

Prices This Attraction Only
MATINEES 60c
EVES. & SUN. 80c

presents
BETTY DAVIS and MIRIAM HOPKINS
in
"THE OLD MAID"
with GEORGE BRENT
Thursday & Friday 7:00 and 9:15
Lillian Hellman'sj

Otello-complete opera (Verdi)--1947 broadcast-Toscanini
Romeo & Juliet-dramatic symphony (Berlioz)-Boston Symphony-Munch
Six Sonatas & Partitas for unace. violin (Bach)-Jascha Heifetz
Pines of Rome;. Fountains of Rome (Respighi)-NBC Symphany-Tosanini
Cavalleria Rusticana (Mascagni)--Pagliacci (Leoncarallo)
Bjoerling, Merrill, Milanov, de los Angeles, Warren, etc.

i'

The Boldest Best-Seller
A. *A22 _ __ f-

NOTE: All nine Beethoven Symphonies are now available individually-
performed by the NBC Symphony, conducted by ARTURO TOSCANINI

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