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January 14, 1954 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1954-01-14

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAIN DAILY

ixa.ils .:>1i.. JL JA:;aJr"ollX ,14, .J.a044.

I I

On"

On Pigs
And Politics
PIGS is pigs.
Politics is politics.
These two truths were brought home
painfully yesterday by the revelation of
what the governor has done to the Uni-
versity's budget request.
The University needed $37,000,000. The
governor recommended that the University
Get $22,500,000. In other words, the gov-
ernor asked the Legislature to lop off about
$14,500,000 from the University budget.
Why? The governor and/or the State bud-
get authorities read the University's bud-
get request and discussed the appropriation
with University officials.
They knew that the University desper-
ately needs to start expanding its facili-
ties now in preparation for the added 7,-
500 students who will be on campus with-
in the next seven years, 1000 of them by
next fall. They knew the University is be-
hind in building up its facilities because of
a 25-year period beginning during the de-
pression when there were no appropria-
tions for building at all. They knew of the
many worthy projects which the University
contemplated. And still they and the gov-
ernor agreed to recommend $2,500,000 in-
stead of the $14,337,200 the University ask-
ed for capital outlays. Why?
The budget officials knew that the Uni-
versity was expecting 1,500 more students on
campus than it had expected when the last
budget was made out. More students re-
quire more teachers, more equipment. And
the University wanted to raise deserving fac-
ulty and staff members' salaries an average
of three to four per cent.
But the governor clipped off an amount
from the University operating request which
would have provided more teachers, more
equipment, and a salary raise.
The reason is apparent. People are wor-
ried about recessions. It's an economy year.
Politics is indeed politics and a balanced
State budget is good politics for.the gover-
nor. So in spite of obvious need, and, in spite
of any personal sympathy with that need,
politics required the governor to cut the
request.
Furthermore, pigs is pigs..
The effect of the governors position is
to make a dramatic declaration some-
thing like this: "Millions for hog but not
one cent for humans."
This might sound ridiculous, but cutting
$977,000 for "research and service in the de-
velopment of human resources" is apparently
just plain good practical government.
The human resources request was includ-
ed in the proposed University budget for the
first time this year. It was designed to par-
allel the agricultural research appropria-
tion Michigan State College gets every year.
Administrator's here figured that human
beings were as important as pigs and cows,
and the State should spend a little money for
their well-being too.
Unfortunately, however, pigs are politi-
cally more powerful than people. Although
only about 10 per cent of the State's peo-
ple and six per cent of its wealth are em-
ployed in agriculture, the farmers are a
tremendous power politically.
The way the state is districted, farm
areas are grossly overrepresented in the Leg-
islature. Besides, farm groups are organized.
They come down to Lansing. And right in
Lansing is Michigan State College, which
the farmer legislators feel is a much more
sensible school than the University. So farm-
ers stick up for pigs, and agricultural devel-
opment moves forward. It would be a fine
thing if the Legislature would change the
governor's mind and put in a good word
and some cash for people too this year.
-Jon Sobeloff
MUsIC

University Symphony Orchestra, Josef
Blatt, conductor, Richard Thurston, stu-
dent conductor. Soloists: Helen Stob, Mary
Spaulding, John Gleason, pianists; Joan
Rossi, Mary Ann Tinkham, sopranos;
Frances Brown Watson, flutist
STUDENT SOLOISTS combined last night
with the University Symphony Orches-
tray in a program of traditional works from
the solo repertory. Eight works were played,
three selections for piano and orchestra,
two operatic arias, one piece for flute and
strong orchestra, and Smetana's Overture to
the "Bartered Bride."
The three works for piano were all tried
and true concert favorites but given en-
thusiastic performances. Helen Stob showed
understanding of Beethoven's lyricism in her
performance of the first movement of the
Concerto No. 4 in G. She was particularly
fluent in the work's cadenza.,John Gleason
attacked Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a
Theme by Paganini with gusto, at times
finding the work's brilliance, and Mary
Spaulding gave a sympathetic performance
of Franck's Symphonic Variations.
Joan Rossi sang the aria "Ebben? Ne
andro lontano" from Catalani's opera "La
Wally." An unfamiliar aria, it is none-
theless very beautiful, in the Puccini man-
ner. Miss Rossi perforned it in grand op-
eratic style, balancing good singing with
theatrical presentation, a combination
also present in Mary Ann Tinkham's
singing of "Una voce poco f a" from Ros-
sini's "Baraber of Seville." Miss Tinkham's

ON THE
Washington Merry-Go-Round
with DREW PEARSON

WASHINGTON-What goes on at a White
House meeting is always supposed to
be a secret, unless the President himself de-
cides to make it public. However, except
during tensed-up wartimes, no White House
sessions have been cloaked in such secrecy
as Ike's recent meetings with cabinet and
capitol leaders on his legislative program.
The President has personally insured
against leaks to the press by pointedly
pledging everyone present to keep their
lips buttoned. This is necessary, he ex-
plains, because discussion at the meetings
is "off the cuff," with a free and frank
exchange of opinions on sometimes con-
troversial subjects that might be misin-
terpreted if appearing in the press.
Naturally there will be differences in op-
inion regarding the legislative docket for
Congress, the President' points out, adding
that he wants to be free to speak his mind
with complete candor and that others at
the meetings were entitled to the same privi-
lege.
At one session, right after Eisenhower had
finished his little speech on secrecy, GOP
Congressman Charley Halleck of Indiana
caused gales of laughter.
"You know," he said, "I never have any
trouble keeping a secret. It's the people I
tell it to who can't keep their mouths shut."
* * *
KING COTTON DEBATE
MOTHER NATURE has had most to do
with knocking Congressional heads to-
gether regarding the biggest farm battle be-
tween the East and West-cotton quotas.
Last summer, California and the come-
lately cotton areas of Arizona and New
Mexico were at loggerheads with old plan-
tation states of Mississippi, Georgia, and
the Southeast. The latter were to have
their cotton acreage cut only 25 per cent,
while the Far West was in for a 52 per
cent cotton reduction.
This meant a loss of about $160,000.000 to
the great central valley of California and
was almost sure to bring economic setbacks.
For the West started to become a really
big cotton-producing area only recently, and
the cotton-acreage quotas are based on the
years 1947-49 and 1951-52. Thus the older
cotton states get the preference.
Last summer, Senators tried to work out
a compromise readjustment of these quotas
-without success. Congress adjourned. Still
no agreement.
But with the openingT of Congress last
week, revised cotton quotas were made the
No. 1 item of discussion, and there's now
a good prospect of agreement.
Reason: The planting season starts
soon. If quotas aren't fixed soon, farmers
can't curtail. Nature won't wait.
NOTE-The new cotton bill will increase
quotas about 3,000,000 acres. Actually, the
motive is politics and nothing else. The in-
crease will ease the political situation all
right, especially in the Far West, where
California farmers are raging mad. But
with a carryover of 5,064,000 bales from the
1952 crop, and an additional 2,714,000 bales
of this 1953 crop probably unmarketed, this
increase may cause trouble later. Experts
believe we will have cotton running out of
our ears at the end of 1954.
* * *
BRITISH COMET
A SIGNIFICANT, sometimes acrid argu-
ment has been taking place between the
British and U.S. aeronautic authorities over
British Comet jet airliners, which unfortu-
nately now seems settled by the recent crash
near Italy.
Civil Aeronautics Administrator Fred Lee

had consistently refused to certify the Com-
et, which caused a storm of resentment in
England. Pan American Airways has pur-
chased three comets from De Havilland for
future delivery, but Lee had taken the po-
sition that the Comet has not proved itself
sufficiently for American certification.
Specifically, he had doubts about the
ship's tendency to stall at low speeds and
its instability in the air. Two of the sub-
sequent seven crashes, at Karachi and
Rome, have resulted from stalling. Follow-
ing this week's crash, the British grounded
all Comets. So, despite questions in the
House of Commons, it looks as if Fred Lee
had been right.
UNDER THE DOME
MORE PRIVATE quotes on Ike's State of
of the Union message: Ohio's statues-
que Sen. John Bricker, after applauding en-
thusiastically in front of TV cameras, snort-
ed privately to Sen. Andy Schoepp'el of Kan-
sas: "I don't know what I'm doing around
here. This is no place for me if that is Re-
publican policy." . . . . Schoeppel nodded in
agreement. . . . Sen. John Butler of Mary-
land to Sen. Hugh Butler of Nebraska: "I
guess we didn't vote for a change after all."
.... It's no secret that McCarthy was once
a flaming New Dealer and bitterly anti-
Herbert Hoover. When McCarthy went to
work for a Republican lawyer in Wisconsin,
the Waupaca County Post commented on
Feb. 20, 1936: "We carefully padded (Mc-
Carthy's) briefcase with a couple copies
of the New Masses, a recent addition of the
.Daily Worker, and a vest pocket sized Das
Kapital....... This was a joking reference
to the fact that McCarthy was a left-winger
and his new Republican boss might not
know about it.
MORE WAR SURPLUS
ASSISTANT President Sherman Adams has
been asked to referee a knock-down bat-
tle over how to dispose of $10,000,000,000 of
surplus property now bulging out of mili-
tary warehouses.
Included in the ten billions are every-
thing from old Mexican War saddles and
oyster forks to World War II cannon and
fighter planes. And what Adams has to
decide is whether the Defense Depart-
ment or the General Services Administra-
tion will dispose of how much surplus
equipment. This may sound easy, but it's
one of the toughest decisions now hang-
ing over the White House.
For if too much surplus Is dumped on the
market it may depress prices, even wreck
some industries. On the other hand, it's
costing the government millions each year
for storage.
Roger Kyes, Deputy Secretary of Defense,
insists that the Pentagon should have
charge of the whole job-since the proper-
ty belongs to the military.
But GS Administrator Edmund Mansure
claims his agency should control the dis-
posal of such common-use items as tooth-
brushes, desks and rugs, etc. Mansure has
pointed out to the White House that his
agency has the personnel and experience to
handle the job; that the Pentagon recovers
an average of only eight per cent of the
value of its surplus goods;. and if the pro-
gram is controlled by ,the military, with all
its complex chain of command, it will be
an open invitation to confusion and corrup-
tion. Also the military may dispose of thou-
sands of an item, such as chairs, at the
same time other government agencies are
purchasing' new chairs. The GSA, as the
"housekeeper" of government, on the other
hand, knows just what agency needs -what.
(Copyright 1954 by the Bell Syndicate)

"I've Been Waiting At That Other Door For
30 Years"
-- - ---ECON OMK
SEE S "
I~~~~ DAL FFCA ULLTIN
I$
\ rr
-- f I
-u

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 18 to January 28
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
EDITOR'S NOTE-Officials have reported that extra
copies of this examination schedule will not be printed for
distribution.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that in case of a conflict the conflict
is arranged for by the class which conflicts with the regular
schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.

a'

we

(Continued from Page 2)
Doctoral Examination for William
Knox Harreli, Bacteriology; thesis:
"Fractionation and Differentiation of
Human, Bovine, and Avian Strains of
Mycobacterium tuberculosis by means
of their Infrared Spectrums," Mon.,
Jan. 18, 1954, 1566 East Medical Bldg.,
at 2 p.m. Chairman, W. J. Nungester.
Doctoral Examination for Juan Azuara
Sales, Pharmaceutical Chemistry; thesis:
"Simply Amines which Contain Cyclo-
heptyl, 4-Methyleycloheptyl, Cyciooctyl,
2- and 4-Pyridyl Groups," Tues., Jan.
19, 2525 Chemistry Bldg., at 1:30 p.m.
Chairman, F. F. Blicke.
Doctoral Examination for Henry Ed-
mond Millson, Jr., Pharmaceutical
Chemistry; thesis: "Basic Diovolanes,"
Wed., Jan. 20, 2525 Chemistry Bldg.,
at 1:30 p.m. Chairman, F. F, Blicke.
Doctoral Examination for Thomas
Samuel Heines, Jr. Chemical Engineer-
ing; thesis:' Operation of Continuous
Thermal Diffusion Columns for Liquids,"
Mon., Jan. 25, 3201 East Engineering
Bldg., at 9:30 a.m. Chairman, J. J. Mar-
tin.
Doctoral Examination for George
Ulrich Brauer, Mathematics; thesis:
"Some Abelian Semi-Groups of Linear
Transformations of Hausdorff Type,"
Sat., Jan. 30, East Council Room, Rack-
ham Bldg., at 9:30 a.m. Chairman,
George Piranian.
Concerts
Organ Recital. David Craighead,
Guest Organist from Occidental College,
Pasadena, California, will present a
programat 4:15 Sunday afternoon, Jan.
17, in Hill Auditorium. It will include
Vivaldi's Concerto in A minor, Buxte-
hude's Chorale Fantasia, "How Brightly
Shines the Morning Star," two Bach
works, Vivace from the Second Trio-So-
nata, and Toccata in F. Following in-
termission Mr. Craighead will play
Pastorale, by Roger-Ducasse; Fugue in
C-sharp minor, by Honegger; and Two
Meditations for Ascension, by Mes-
siaen. The recital will be open to the
general public without charge.
May Festival. The Philadelphia Or-
chestra will participate in all six con-
certs; and the tentative assignment of
performers is as follows:
THURS., APRIL 29, 8:30 p.m. Lily
Pons, soloist; Eugene Ormandy, conduc-
tor.
FRI., APRIL 30, 8:30 p.m. University
Choral Union; Thor Johnson, conduc-
tors "Gloria" by Vivaldi, with Lois
Marshall, soprano and Blanche Thebom,
contralto. First United States perform-
ances of Carlos Chavez' "El Sol," Cor-
rido Mexicano. Leonard Rose, Cellist, in
*I

Dvorak Concerto.
SAT., MAY 1, 2:30 p.m. All-Brahms
program', Eugene Ormandy, conductor.
Youth Chorus, Marguerite Hood, con-
ductor, in Brahms songs. Double Con-
certo with Jacob Krachmalnick violin-
ist and Lorne Munro, cellist.
SAT., MAY 1, 8:30 p.m. Zinka Milanov,
soprano, and Kurt Baum, tenor; Eu-
gene Ormandy, conductor.
SUN., MAY 2. 2:30 p.m. Mendelssohn's
"Elijah" with University Choral Union;
Lois Marshall, soprano; Blanche The-
bom, contralto; John MCollum, tenor;
William Warfield, baritone; Thor John-
son, conductor.f
SUN., MAY 2, 8:30 p.m. Artur Rubin-
stein, pianist; Eugene Ormandy, con-
ductor.
Orders for season tickets are now
being accepted and filed in sequence
at the University Musical Society offices
in Burton Tower. Tickets are $12.00,
$9.00 and $8.00 each.
Faculty Concert Postponed. The pi-
ano recital by John Kollen, scheduled
for Thurs., Feb. 11, in Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theater, has been postponed. The
new date will be announced later.
Band Concert Cancelled. The concert
by the University Symphony Band. pre-
viously announced for Tues., Feb. 23,
in Hill Auditorium, has been cancelled.
The next concert by the Band will be
given at 4:15 Sunday afternoon, Mar.
28.
The Toronto Symphony Orchestra,
Sir Ernest MacMillan, Conductor, will
give the 6th program in the current
Choral Union Concert Series, Wed., Feb.
10, at 8:30, in Hill Auditorium. The oc-
casion will mark the first performance
of this Canadian orchestra in An Ar-
bor.I
Tickets are available at $1.50, $2.00,
$2.50, and $3.00 at the offices of the
University Musical Society, Burton Me-
morial Tower.
The Griller String Quartet and the
Reginald Kell Players will participate in
the 14th annual Chamber Music Festi-
val in Rackham Auditorium. The Grill-
er group is composed of Sidney Griller
and Jack O'Brien, violins; Philip Bur-
ton, viola; and Coin Hampton, cello:
and will present two programs, Fri-
day evening, Feb. 19, and Sunday after-
noon, Feb. 21. The Kell Players include
Reginald Kell, clarinetist Joel Rosen,
pianist; Melvin Ritter, violinist; and
Aurora Natola, cellist. This group will
be heard Saturday evening, Feb. 20.
Tickets for the three concerts are
available at the offices of the Universi-
ty Musical Society in Burton Tower, at
$3.50 and $2.50; and for single concerts
at $1.75 and $1.25 each,
Events Today
Tartuffe; or, The Impostor, Moliere's
classic French comedy, will be present-
ed in English by the Department of
Speech tonight at 8 o'clock in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. A special stu-
dent rate of any seat In the house for
50c is in effect tonight. The regular rate
is $1.20 - 90c - 60c. Lydia Mendelssohn
Box office is open from 10 am. until 8
p.m. All seats are reserved.
La p'tite causette will meet today
from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. in the Michigan
Union cafeteria. This is the last meet-
ing of the semester and only French
will be spoken! Everyone welcome.
Orthodox Students Society. Final
meeting and party of the first semester
tonight at 7:30 in the basement recre-
ation room of Lane Hall, Everyone come
and bring along a friend.
Christian Science Organization. Tes-
timony meeting tonight at 7:30 p.m.,
Fireside Room, Lane Hall, All are wel-
come.
Wives of Students and Faculty, School
of Conservation and Natural Resources.
Meeting this evening, 8 p.m., home of
Miss Veo Foster (libarian), 1011 Church
St.
International Center Weekly Tea will
be held this afternoon from 4:30 to 6
at the International Center.(
The Congregational-Disciples Guild.
Mid-week Meditation in Douglas Chap-
el, 5:00-5:30. p.m. Freshman Discussion
Group at Guild House, 7:00-8:00 p.m.
Hillel. 4 p.m. - Class in Jewish Holi-
dayvObservances; 7:30 p.m. - Class in
Advanced Hebrew; 8 p.m. - Music-For-
All, classical musi recorded on Hi-Fi
sound system

TIME OF
MONDAY
TUESDAY

CLASS
(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
(at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3
(at 4

TIME OF EXAMINATION
Tuesday, January 26 9-1
Monday, January 18 9-12
Wednesday, January 20 9-12
Saturday, January 23 9-12
Monday, January 18 2-5
Monday, January 25 2-5
Thursday, January 28 9-12
Thursday, January 21 2-5
Monday, January 18 2-5

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Wednesday, January 27
Tuesday, January 19
Friday, January 22
Monday, January 25
Thursday, January 28
Thursday, January 21
Saturday, January 23

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

r

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Psychology 31
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31
Zoology 1
Botany 1, 2, 122
Chemistry 3
Sociology 51, 54, 60
Political Science i
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54

Monday, January 18
Tuesday,'January 19
Wednesday, January 20
Wednesday, January 20
Friday, January 22
Friday, January 22
Saturday, January 23
Tuesday, January 26
Tuesday, January 26
Wednesday, January 27

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2R5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Drawing 3
English 11
MIE 136
CE 23, 151
Drawing 2
EE 4, 5
EM 1,2
PE 11, 13
CM 124
Drawing 1
MIE 135
CE 21, 22
Chemistry
PE 31, 32,
Economics

Monday, January 18
Monday, January 18
Monday, January 18
Monday, January 18
Tuesday, January 19
Tuesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 20
Thursday, January 21
Thursday, January 21
Friday, January 22
Friday, January 22
Saturday, January 23
Saturday, January 23
Tuesday, January 26
Wednesday, January 27

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

,I

3
131
53, 54

DRAMA

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules. {
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of cohflicts be-.
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 3044 East Engineer-
ing Building between January 4 and January 12 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for
all applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of
examinations, see bulletin board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF- EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
tee/'4 TO THE EDITOR
The Daily welcomes communications from its readers on matters of
general interest, and will publish all letters which are signed by the writer
and in good taste. Letters exceeding 300 words in length, defamatory or
libelous letters, and letters which for any reason are not in good taste will
be condensed, edited or withheld from publication at the discretion of the
editors.

A t Lydia Mendelssohn..
TARTUFFE, a Comedy in Five Acts by
Moliere. Presented by the Speech Depart-
ment, Directed by Hugh A. Norton.
IT IS A TRIBUTE to the genius of Moliere
that Tartuffe in the 20th century is nearly
as amusing as it was in the 17th. It is a
triubute to the Speech Department that they
managed last night to impart much of its
spirit and humor to a modern audience. On a
large scale Tartuffe is a satire of 17th cen-
tury French society which apparently was
incapable of carrying on its affairs without
the frequent intervention of its servants.
More particularly, it is the tale of the in-
credibly gullible Orgon who admits Tartuffe
into his household, convinced he is a model
of religious sobriety. The effects of Orgon's

ridiculous failure to notice Tartuffe's designs
on his wife-designs which provide excellent
opportunities for crawling under tables and
emerging at critical moments from behind
screens-are truly amusing.
Much of the excellence of this perform-
ance must be attributed to its director,
Professor Norton. A rapid pace was pre-
served throughout which off-set the te-
dium of the translation; Mr. Norton ap,
parently realized that the inherent wit
in Moliere's alexandrines was largely dis-
sipated and that the play's success must
depend on comedy effect alone. Therefore
speeches came off at a fine clip. The ac-
tors, strode about the stage like trained
athletes. Indeed, Gwen Arner as Dorine,
the pheonominally perceptive maid, would
have been monotonous in her animation'
had she not carried it off with such au-
thority. Conrad Stolzenbach as Tartuffe is
to be congratulated for making himself

Sixty-Fourth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Harry Lunn..........Managing Editor
Eric Vetter ................ City Editorj
Virginia Voss........ Editorial Director
Mike Wolff.......Associate City Editor
Alice B. Silvei..Assoc. Editorial Directori
Diane Decker...........Associate Editor
Helene Simon ........ Associate Editor
Ivan Kaye...............Sports Editor.
Paul Greenberg.... Assoc. Sports Editor
Marilyn Campbell.......Women's Editor
Kathy Zeisler....Assoc. Women's Editor
Don Campbell.......Head Photographer!
Business Staff
Thomas Treeger......Business Manager
William Kaufman Advertising Manager
Harlean ankin. ... Assoc. Business Mgr.
William Seiden.......,Finance Manager
James Sharp......Circulation ManagerS
Telephone NO 23-24-1

/ ,.. + mlir. h . mi i wb~ ho nly

'ri" Y . D Tvr Tl

Hillel. This week's Friday Evening IRight for W rong IReason 1 "1-"~1M"" £"aarwv
Kosher Dinner has been cancelled. want to know if the play was good
Hillel Chorus. N0 further rehearsals To the Editor: or bad, and why.
till Feb. 7. IONSIDERING that he is a for- Sentences like" . . . All the pea-
The Modern Dance Club will not meet C S E N tthiannces ,,.Alt e ,

M r ir

I

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