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January 14, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-01-14

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

0

'M' Wrestlers
THIRD YEAR VETERAN:

Home O e

ier Saturday
Wlcats First Opponent
Of Four for Wolverines

Fisher To Hold Baseball
Clinic for Army Troops

Cagers' Defense Sparked by Eaddy

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c
c:
0
i

Ray Fisher, Michigan's veteran
baseball coach, will take his tal-
nts to Europe late next month,
conducting a series of baseball
clinics for the Army.
Fisher, recently named "Coach
of the Year," will hold these clinics
in four sections of Germany, and
will discuss all phases of baseball
with the troops. He will empha-
size pitching and catching.
The coach of the NCAA cham-
pions will spend two weeks on the

continent, and will work along
with another college coach yet to
be selected. The pair will work in
conjunction with the coaches of
the various army camps. )
Fisher received the invitation
from Commander in Chief of the
Armed Forces in Europe, Lt. Gen.
Charles L. Bolte, and will report
to Washington on Feb. 16.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
Detroit 3, New York 1

By LAVERNE LANE
One of the flashiest guards in
the country, versatile Don Eaddy,
has begun the 1953-54 season in
fine style.
A comparatively small guard,
measuring 5-11 and weighing 165,
Eaddy has proved this to be no
handicap. His outstanding defen-
sive work against high scoring op-
ponents who often have a size ad-
vantage has shown him to be one
7 of the best. In Michigan's initial
Beginning Monday, January
18,the Intramural S po r t s
Building will be open for use
from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.,
with the new hours in effect
until the reopening of classes
on February 8.
The gymnasium will not be
available for use the week of
' February 1.
--Earl Riskey
conference game with Indiana, last
year's NCAA champs, he held All-
American Bob Leonard to five field
goals in twenty-two attempts.
* *
ALTHOUGH suffering from a
leg injury he incurred in the Val-
paraiso game earlier in the season,
he has recovered sufficiently to
average ten points a game .
More familiar to his friends as
"don-don," he scored 292 points

last year which gave him runner-
up spot in the team scoring race.
He was not overlooked 'by the
Associated Press which gave him
recognition on one of its All-
American teams.
The 20-year-old junior is a nat-
ural athlete. Starting his varsity
career as a freshman, he has ex-
celled in basketball, baseball, and
football.
* *.*
ON THE gridiron he was consid-
ered to have great potential. How-
ever, he dropped the sport in order
to concentrate on basketball. Not
to be overlooked is the outstanding
ability he has exhibited on the dia-
mond, which last year rated him a
berth on the All Big Ten baseball
team.
A native son of Grand Rapids,
he attendedrOttawa Hills High
School where he collected a
grand total of 12 letters.
A Jackie Robinson fan, Eaddy
says that his big brother Jim is his
idol and it was he who inspired
him to play ball. His brother is a
forward on the Ohio Central State
basketball squad.
I * *' *
IN REFERENCE to his post
graduate career, Eaddy, now a
physical education major, stated.
"I really don't have much choice
as the Air Force will claim most of
my time for the three years foi-

lowing graduation." He feels that
he will be too old to play any pro-
fessional ball by the time he gets
out of the service.
Eaddy, a born comedian, be-
comes very serious when par-
ticipating in any athletic con-
test. When the Maize and Blue
dropped the 62-60 thriller to In-
diana, Eaddy who had played a
magnificent game that night,
collapsed to the floor in disap-
pointment.
This young man who draws ad-
miration from both the fans and
his fellow teammates, is looking
forward to one more year of var-
sity competition.

TheaMichigan wrestling team em
will face Northwestern here Sat- Ia tam

composed mostly of soph-

DON EADDY
... hustling hoopster

Reasons for Hockey Penalties
Explained' to Aid Enthusiasts

U
L
tl
k
T,
E
S
T
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t
t

Irday in the first of what prom- omores who rolled up very good v
ises to be a tough four-meet sched- records last year while wrestling
ule during the next three weeks. in seven scheduled freshmen s
After meeting the Wildcats this meets.
Saturday at 3 p.m. in Yost Field ONE OF STONE'S brightest '
House, the Wolverines will face stars on the frosh squad last year
Hofstra College and Syracuse in was John Wandell in the 123 pound
an eastern trip the end of this class. He went undefeated in the
month, and then return here to seven meets and concluded the
entertain Purdue on Saturday, season by taking a third in the
February 6. New York State A.A.U. champion-
* * *ships.
LAST YEAR Coach Jack Riley's ships.
Northwestern team won four dual Ann Arbor they will face Pur-
matches, lost two and finished due in an afternoon match on
seventh in the Big Ten. However February 6. Under the direction
he will field a much stronger squad of Coach Claude Reeck the
this year consisting of four re-Biemkr iihdi it
turning lettermen and a crew of plerlaker ith n m
topnoch sphomres.place last year with only Tom
topnotch sophomores. Hankins, 165-pounder, and Al
Returning lettermen for the Vega, 123-pounder scoring points
visiting Wildcats, who lost to by taking fourths in their spec-
Michigan last year by a score of ialties.
26-8, include Jack Herschend So far Purdue has had only two
who placed third in the Con- meets, losing to Iowa State Teach-
ference at 123 pounds last year ers 14-13, last Friday and then de-
and Bill Ellwood who placed feating Cornell College of Iowa by
fourth at 147 pounds. a score of 19-8.
Stand-outs among Coach Riley's The meet this Saturday will
sophomores include Bob McCray give Wolverine fans a look at
at 130 pounds, Pete Cappas at 157 the new scoring rule change
pounds, Ted Struver at 167 pounds which may help open up the
and varsity football tackle John collegiate mat game this year.
Smith at heavyweight. The "predicament point rule"
* * * gives a point to the aggressor when
TWO WEEKS later Coach Cliff ''he holds his opponent's shoulders
Keen's charges will be in Hemp- to the mat for less than a second
or when he holds his opponent's
shoulders within four inches of the
Li hts Out mat for two seconds. A point is
Oe also awarded when the aggressor
holds an opponent in such a way
CHICAGO - (R) - Former that one shoulder is down and the
heavyweight champion Ezzard other at a 45-degree angle.
Charles exploded a second-i_-...-.

follow tie crowds
to KUOHN'S January.
CLEARANCE SALE.

n

(Second of two articles explaining
some of the basic rules of college ice
hockey. Today's article deals with
types of penalties.)
By HANLEY GURWIN
According to the Official NCAA
Ice Hockey rules, penalties against
individual players are classified as
a Minor Penalty, a Major Penal-
ty, or a Misconduct Penalty.
The Minor Penalty calls for two
minutes in the penalty box, the
Major for five minutes, and the
Misconduct for ten. Only while a
player is serving a *Misconduct
Penalty may a substitute be used
to replace him.

rr

all

THE EXCEPTION to this rule
occurs when a goaltender is giv-
en a Minor Penalty. In this case,
a teammate designated by the
captain serves the time instead.
The goaltender himself must go
to the penalty box however when
a Major or Misconduct Penalty is
called against him.
Minor Penalties are called for
various infractions of the game
including high-sticking, offens-
ive or defensive interference,
throwing stick, illegal body-
checking, hooking, slashing, trip-
ping, roughing, cross-checking,
etc.
High-sticking is carrying the
stick above the height of four
feet from the ice. A player may
not play the puck with his stick
in any manner when the puck is
more than two feet off the ice. A
Major penalty is called if any in-
jury results from improper use of
the stick at any height.
* * * b
A FAIR body-check is one in
which a player with both feet be-
hind the blue line in his Defensive
Zone checks an opponent, who is
in possession of the puck, by using
his hip or body, from the front,
diagonally from the front, or
straight from the side and does
not take more than two fast steps
in executing the check.
It is charging if more than
two fast steps are taken, or if
the check is made from behind
or diagonally behind the oppo-
nent.
There shall be no pushing,
charging, or body checking an op-
ponent into the side or end boards
or goal cages, or attempting to do
so. Flagrant violations of-any of
the rules which ordinarily result
in Minor Penalties will be called a
Major, as will fighting, slugging
with the fists or stick, kicking, or
the attempting to do so.
* * *
A MISCONDUCT Penalty con-
sists of ten minutes and is imposed
upon players, when they use foul
or abusive language to an official

or in other ways attempt to in-'
fluence him. It will also be called
when a player persists in disput-
ing decisions or in showing dis-
respect for an official.
No team may be short more
than two men from the ice at a
time. If a penalty is called while
a team already has two others
serving time, then the third
penalty does not begin until one
of the other men comes out of
the penalty box. The third play-
er penalized may not play in the
meantime, but a substitute may
be used until his penalty starts.
Although this does not pertain
to penalties, an explanation of
Western Intercollegiate Ice Hock-
ey League method of determining
point values of hockey games might
be beneficial to many fans.
* * *
Each of the seven teams in the
league meets every other team ei-
ther twice or four times through-
out the season. If the teams meet
on four occasions, then each game'
is worth one point to the winner.
If the teams meet only twice, then
each game counts two points in
the standings. This explains why
total points in the standings can
not be figured out merely by
checking the won and lost records
of the teams.
N7VTCAA Vetoes
'Liberalization
Of Sub Rules
SARASOTA, Fla.- P)--The
NCAA Football Rules Committee,
after hearing some 40 proposals to
liberalize the limited substitution
rule on college gridirons, turned
them all down yesterday.
"One-platoon football found in-
creasing favor among the public,
the coaches, the players and ev-
erybody during the 1953 season,"
said the committee secretary, E.
E. Wieman from the University of
Denver.
* * *
"WE WERE not willing to make,
any changes until we have had
another year of experience with
it."
The committee strongly con-
demned the faking of injuries to
stop the clock and the "sucker
shift" which is intended to pull
the opposition offside.
No rules changes were made but
the committee urged the country's
college coaches to eliminate "this
unethical practice from the great
American game for which they
have a primary responsibility."

Sumts
Sportcoats
Topcoats
Overcoats
Jackets
Suedes
included
WALK A FEW STEPS
AND SAVE DOLLARS

KUOHN'S

O FF

217 East Liberty

Phone NO 8-8020

ILZ

round knockout over Chicago's
Bob Satterfield last night at
the Chicago Stadium to solid-
ify his claim for a June title
bout. with . champion .Rocky
Marciano.

I

I

stead, New York to face The Fly-
ing Dutchmen of Hofstra College
on January 30 and then travel to
Syracuse on February 1.
Wrestling at Hofstra is one of
the top varsity sports, with the
National Senior A.A.U. Cham-
pionships being held there in
both 1948 and 1950. This is the
eighth year of inter-collegiate
competition for the Blue and
Gold of Hofstra with an overall
record of 48 victories, 17 set-
backs and four ties.
Coach Walter "Brick" Stone has

Limited number of
'53 'Ensians are on sale
for 6.00 at the
Student Publications Bldg...

o a
*i
e !"jI

31,000 ACTUAL STUDENT INTERVIEWS,
SHOW COLLEGE SMOKERS PREFER LUCKIES,
TO ALL OTHER BRANDS!

SAL
SRLE
MEN'S SHOES
100 PAIRS OF
MEN'S W. L. DOUGLAS, E. E. TAYLOR
AND HOLLAND RACING OXFORDS
AND CASUALS IN BROKEN SIZES
AND DISCONTINUED STYLES.
$595

au*JL S iiUU C)Iegs r ierre& z proves .ucxles iove1 wi1elmIiI1g popJj~- 1

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