100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 13, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'AGE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1954

AGE THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.....
I

'U' Offers 29 Libraries for Student Use

Former Student's Play
To Open in Philadelphia

Norman Rosten, '38 Grad., poet,
playwright, and radio dramatist,
who won the major Avery Hop-
wood awards in drama and poetry
in 1938, will have his most recent
play, "Mardi Gras," premiered in
Philadelphia today.
After a run in Philadelphia, the
play will open in New York on
January 28.
. * .
"MARDI GRAS, a prose drama
written in poetic mood, is the story
of out-of-season lives of native
Coney Islanders, centered around
a local festival.
Rosten came to the Univer-
sity as a graduate student in
1937 to study playwriting on a
Theater Guild Playwriting Fel-
lowship. "This Proud Pilgrim-
age," a poetic drama written by
Rosten at the University, was
produced by Play Production
and the following year in New
York on the Treater Guild spon-
sored experimental theater pro-
gram.
While at the University, Rosten
wrote his first volume of poetry,
"Return Again Traveler," which
was published in 1940 by the Yale
Series of Younger Poets. Since
then he has had four volumes of
poetry published, the most recent
of which, "The Plane and The
Shadow," came out last spring.
A prose comedy by Rosten,
"First Stop to Heaven," was pro-

duced on Broadway in 1941. Rec-
ognized as one of the few distin-
guished writers for radio, he has
written numerous radio dramas
for such programs as Cavalcade
of America and the Treasury Star
Parade.
Technic
The January issue of the
Michigan Technic, engineering
magazine, will be on sale to-
morrow and Friday in the Engi-
neering Arch.
Issues are 25c per copy.

Detroit Critic
To Lecture
The final speech assembly for
the fall semester will be held at
4 p.m. today in the Rackham Lec-
ture Auditorium.
Russel McLauchlin, Drama Ed-
itor and critic for the Detroit News
will be the guest speaker and will
use "The Fabulous Invalid" as his
topic. McLauchlin will be intro-
duced by Prof. William Halstead
of the speech department.
McLauchlin has been the music
and drama critic on the News for
25 years. Before that he was on
the papers' editorial staff for five
years.
The assembly is open to the
public and no admission will be
charged.

'1

1

:1
-1

-Daily-Dick GaskilU
WOMEN'S LEAGUE LENDS SPACE AND LUXURY FINALS PROMOTE STUDIOUS ATMOSPHERE IN CHEMISTRY LIBRARY

By JANET WALTER
Students facing finals and look-
ing for a quiet abode in which to
study will be interested to learn
that, besides the four main Ii-
braries, there are twenty-five
branch libraries across campus.
Each library supplies not only
different types of books to choose
from, but also a different atmos-
phere and location.
FOR THE latest modern facili-
ties in studying, the Social Science
Library in Mason Hall, with its
modern furnishings, florescent
lighting, and individual booths in
which to study should provide a
new and quiet setting.
For the greatest comfort,
women students might try tak-
ing off their shoes and reclining
in an easy chair in the League

Library, or for the men, the
Union Library.
The Angell Hall Study Hall
seems typical of most of the old-
er libraries, being composed of
simply rows of tables and stacks
of books. Also in Angell Hall there
are the Economics and Mathemat-
ics Libraries.
For music students, there is the
small library of narrow volumes
up in BuxtonTower, and for as-
tronomers, there is one in the Ob-
servatory.
* * *
IN THE same building with the
General Library is the Library
Science Library and the Medical
Library for students of medicine
and nursing. The*University Hos-
pital houses a similar library for
doctors and nurses.
In the Chemistry Library,

decorated with sketches of fa-
mouschemists and the founders
of the first honorary chemical
society, are books for chemists
and pharmacists.
The East and West Engineering
buildings harbor three libraries.
For scientists in other fields
there is 'a Dentistry Library, Na-
tural Resources and Natural Sci-
ence Library and a Physics Li-
brary.
OTHER specialized libaries in-
cludes the Architecture Library,
Business Administration Library,
Education Library, Fine Arts Li-
brary, and Museum Library.
The Public Catalog in the Gen-
eral Library lists all books in the
University Libraries and tells in
which branch library they may be
found.

GAVARNI'S ART TOO:
Museum Exhibit Displays
Indian, Persian works
o --

Limited number of

By DEBBY BERG
The Museum of Art is current-
ly featuring an exhibit of the wa-
tercolors and drawings of Gav-
arni and a display of Persian and
Indian textiles and miniatures.
One of the greatest nineteenth
century characterists, Gavarni. a
Frenchman whose real name was
Guillaume Sulpice Chevalier, is
described as "more interested in
portraying the foibles of different
classes of Parisian society than in
political satire," in Marvin C. Ross
forward to a guide of the exhibi-
tion.
SLG Agenda
Student Legislature will meet
at 7:30 p.m. today in Strauss
House Dining Rmn. of East
Quadrangle to discuss the fol-
lowing topics:
SAC Study Committee Re-
port
Ualendaring Committee Re-
port
Student Book Exchange
Committee Reports
All interested students and1
faculty members have been in-
vited by SL to attend the meet-
ing.

THE watercolors and drawings
in this exhibit represent two
phases of Gavarni's development.
One begins with his trips to Eng-
land and the other begins in 1851,
after his return to France.
Gavarni, a former apprentice
in an engine factory, also did
work with lithographs. Rank-
ing among the greatest litho-
graphic artists of his day, Ga-
varni is best know'n in the Unit-
ed States for his work in this
medium.
This collection of Gavarni's
works in the west gallery of the
museum was selected from the
Walters Art Gallery of Baltimore
and from the Rosenwald Collection
in the National Gallery of Art and
is being circulated by the Smith-
sonian Institute.
* s* *
THE PERSIAN and Indianmin-
iatures in the north gallery are
illuminations from hand lettered
manuscripts."
Used to illuminate the text of
the Persian books and later In-
dian ones, these miniatures are
small, paintings which take up a
whole or part of a page.
Read and Use.
Daily Classifieds

s-O( 2
(J4 .

SUBSCRIBE
to the 1954
MICHIGANENSIAN
at
REGISTRATION!

I

'53 'Ensians are on sale,
for 6.00 at the
Student PubIcations Bldg...

HILL AUDITORIUM
February 12th
TWO SHOWS: 7:15 P.M. - 9:30 P.M.

'.

S

OUNG ' eRIC A Es

\L '4

(

i
,

1

Festival of Modern American Jazz t
I Michigan League
I Ann Arbor, Michigan

m

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan