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January 07, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-01-07

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1954
Union Sponsored Photo Contest.
Offers Cameras, Cash Prizes

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVR

j
}' ( w

League Plans
Dedication of
imusic Rooms

HYPNOTIC INFLUENCE:
Polgar To Present 'Miracles of the Mind' Show

Men Coeds
- To Compete
For Awards
With the end of the semester
fast approaching, campus shut-
ter-bugs have only a little over a
week before the Jan. 15 deadline
set for the Union Amateur Photo
Contest.
All entries in the community-
wide contest must be at the Stu-
dent Offices on the main floor of
the Union by 5 p.m. on that Fri-
day.
* « «
REPRESENTING the first time
such a contest has been sponsored
by the Union, the competition will
feature exhibition of all pictures
entered, many prizes for winners
in all divisions and a possible
chance for national publication of
contest winners.
Strictly for amateur photog-
raphers, both men and coeds, the
contest has been divided into
three divisions. Prints depicting
University and Ann Arbor scenes
will be placed in the campus
and community scenes section,
while pictures involving some
phases of University academic
work will be judged under the
division entitled curriculum.
This latter group includes prints
taken in classes, dorms and so
on.
All pictures showing athletic, so-
cial and campus activities will be
entered in the extra-curriculum
division.
* * *
ALL ENTRIES, which must be
5 by 7 inches-in size, will be judged
soon after the contest deadline by
representatives sent by the var-
ious camera dealers who are con-
tributing prizes. Several faculty
members will also be included on
the judging board.
According to plans made by
the committee in charge of the
contest, there will be two judges
for each division, plus a judge
who will award the grand prize.
Heading the award list is an
Argus C-3 camera with a cintar
F:3.5 coated lense. This grand prize
will be awarded for the best over-
all picture, irrespective of division.
WITH A FIRST and second
prize planned for each of the three
divisions, the awards will be main-
ly in the form of gift certificates,
ranging from $5 to' $15. These
have been contributed by various
local camera dealers and mer-
chants. Also among the prizes is
a $20 Ansco camera.
Since this contest is open to

i'

I

Ceremony To Include
Council Presentation,
Reception for Guests

Daily-Betsy Smith
GOT THE SHOT?-An enterprising young shutterbug searches for
prize-winning material to enter the Union-sponsored photography
contest. All entries must be in the Union Student Offices by
5 p.m. Friday, January 15.
the community as well as to Uni- have been informed of the tentA-

versity students, residents of
Ann Arbor are invited to enter
their prints.
Each person may present as
many pictures for judging as he
wishes, providing each is accom-
panied by an entry blank.
* * *
THESE ENTRY blanks may be
obtained at the Student Offices,
as well as at the various contribu-
ting merchants.
No name or markings of any
sort may appear on an entry
other than what might appear in
the photograph itself. Pictures,
each of which must be submitted
by the person who took it, are
to be unmounted.
As well as planning the local
contest, members of the commit-
tee have also been working on ar-
rangements for a national Union
photo contest. In order to find out
what other schools might think of
the idea, questionnaires were sent
out to over 200 colleges.
ACCORDING to contest chair-
man Mark Gallon, the results of
the poll have supported the idea
almost entirely.
Tentative plans for the nar.
tional contest, which would be.
centered here in Ann Arbor, call
for display and judging at the
Union. Various camera compan-
ies would be offered a chance to
cooperate in the plans.
Several national publications

tive plans. One national mag zine
has offered to publish the win -
ning entries in the local contes't,
providing they are of an appr Dp-
,riate type.
Women's Groun
To Hold Meeting
The Republican Women's, <:ub
of Ann Arbor will hold its ar'.al
meeting and membership drive at
2:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Wor nn's
City Club.
The organization will pr £sent
Margaret Callam Goebel of C rand
Rapids who will speak on The
Majority Bloc." Mrs. Goel*,el is
widely known in Michigan ;Ls an
author, columnist, literary critic
and lecturer on current bock s and
world affairs.
* * *
SHE WRITES a weekly c lumn
for the Grand Rapids Hera- and
has published articles in wy veral
nation-wide magazines.
Mrs. Goebel is active ire Re-
publican affairs in the stat e. She
is on the Speaker's Bure wu for
the Republican National Com-
mittee and a member of tI W Ar-
thur H. Vandenburg Club s Re-
publican Women for Kent Coun-
ty.
She is also a- member sf The
American NewspaperwomenA; Club
of Washington and the M8u siness
and Professional Women's club.
* * *
ALL INTERESTED wor ne n are
invited to attend the meet i g and
tea.
Special invitations have b+ an ex-I
tended to guests from Bi nming-'
ham, Jackson, Grand Rapit s', Ann
Arbor, Monroe, Mt. Plea 4xnt and
Royal Oak.
In charge of arrangem. en ts for!
the meeting are Ruth B. Williams
of Ann Arbor and May Teath oft
Ypsilanti.
In Italy
In Italy, children set; out their
shoes on the evening of ,Jan. 5
to attract La Befana, ai a old wom-
an dressed in rags an d riding a
broomstick who brings-asb es for
the bad and Yuletide gifts .for the
good.

The Women's League Council
mill dedicate three music listening
iC'oms to the late Barbara J. Little,
\51, at 4 p.m. Sunday at the Lea-
gue.
The dedication will take place
ii i the Henderson Room of the
L eague. The ceremony will include'
kief talks by Dean of Women Deb-
orah Bacon and Dr. Lionel H.
Laing, associate professor of the
''I'olitical science department. Sue
Riggs, League President, will pre-
sent the rooms, on behalf of the
women students to Mrs. Ralph
Boehnke, chairman of the Michi-
gan League Board of Governors.
Mrs. Boehnke will in turn pre-
sent the listening rooms to Presi-
dent Harlan H. Hatcher and Re-
gent Vera B. Baits. A short recep-
tion will follow in the Vandenberg
Room.
There will be an opportunity for
guests to inspect the rooms which
have just been completely furn-
ished.
The 1951-52 Women's League
Council made the original plans
to raise funds for the sound-proof-
ing and furnishing of the three
music listening rooms on the third
floor of the League.
This project was established in
memory of the late Barbara J.
Little, Delta Delta Delta alumna
and former chairman of the Wo-
men's Judiciary Council, who died
in an accident in the summer of
1951.
The listening rooms were fi-
nanced by contributions of the
League activities since 1952. In
that year Frosh Weekend, Sopho-
more Cabaret, Junior Girls' Play,
Senior Supper and the Summer
Session gave almost $3,000.
The following year the same ac-
tivities again gave over $2,000,
which was supplemented by spec-
ial contributions by individuals
and a $200 gift from Delta Delta
Delta to be used for purchasing
furniture' in listening room 'B.'
A picture of Miss Little also ap-
pears in the room.
This special fund paid for the
sound-proofing, painting, draper-
ies, rugs, lamps and furniture
EVALUATION COMMITTEE-
There will be a meeting of the
League Evaluation Committee at
4 p.m. today in the League.
ORIENTATION LEADERS -
Women are needed as orientation
leaders for the spring semester.
Coeds are urged to sign up im-
mediately in the Under-graduate
office of the League.
* *' *
MICHIGRAS-There will be a
meeting of the entire Michigras
decorations committee at 7 p.m.
tonight in the Union.
* * *
WOMEN'S SENATE-The Wo-
men's Senate will not hold its reg-
ular January meeting, but mem-
bers are requested to return their
portrait collection fund containers
to the Undergraduate Office in
the League by Friday at 5 p.m.
* * *
COUNSELOR'S CLUB - Mem-
bers of the WAA Camp Counselors'
Club will hold a "sleep out" this
weekend.
Coeds will leave the WAB at 1:30
p.m. on Saturday and return to
Ann Arbor in time for dinner Sun-
day noon. Those who haven't paid
yet are requested by Manager
Paula Strong to leave the two dol-
lar fee at the Barbour Gym

Dr. Franz J. Polgar, heralded by
magazines and newspapers as
"America's greatest one - man
show," will present his "Miracles
of the Mind" at 8:30 p.m. Friday,
January 15, in Hill Auditorium.
Polf;ar's performance at the
University is sponsored by the In-I
ter-House Council. The proceedsI
will be used to -purchase office
equipment, a service project in
the spring, and will pay for the
publishing of IHC booklets and
the regulation booklets for men's
dormitories on campus.
TICKETS FOR this year's pro-
gram are priced at $1.25 for re-I
served seats and $1 for general
admission, Roger Kidston, presi-
dent of IHC announced.
Tickets will be sold from 1 p.-
m. to 5 p.m. starting Monday at
Hill Auditorium and from 10 a.-l
m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
at the Business Administration1
building.f
,The Polgar Show co-chairmen
are Dave Gross and Jon Collins,1
while the secretary is Marcia Sal-I
tz. Sub-chairmen for the produc-
tion are: auditorium, Jim Marvri:
tickets, Ron Charfoos; publicity,
Barbara Greenfield and posters,
Sherwin Sokolov.
POLGAR HAS given over 1,100
programs in the past three years
before outstanding forums, Town
JGP Committee =
To Hold Tryouts
For Major Parts '
Tryouts for singing and speak- 3
ing parts in the 1954 Junior Girls
Play will be held from 2 to 5 p.m.
and from 7 to 10 p.m. today, and
from 2 to 5 p.m. tomorrow in the
League.
Women interested in dancing
parts may audition from 7 to 10
p.m. today and from 2 to 5 p.m.
tomorrow.

DR. POLGAR

Halls, universities, conventions
and other groups. .He performed
here last February in Hill Audi-
torium. The program was spon-
sored by South Quadrangle for the
benefit of the University Fresh Air
Camp.
Polgar is a medium-sized, al-
most shy fellow with a smile-
wrinkled face. He likes people
and has a keen sense of humor.
He has lectured in this country
since 1933, when he came from
Hungary. He was a student of
psychoanalysis, hypnosis and
other psychic phenomena.
When Polgar appears before an
audience, billed as a man who can
read minds, memorize whole ma-
gazines at a single sitting and
hypnotize many persons simultan-
eously, some of "the throng are
antagonistic, shouting at him
mentally, "All right, you got us

here. Now prove, if you can, that were acquired after a bomb ex-
you are able to do what you say." plosion buried him in an Hun-
By the end of the performance, garian army trench for three days
speaker and audience are like old during World War I. A f t e r
friends. months in a hospital, he regained
* * * his lost speech and memory, but
A GROUP of editors and re- the strong telepathic quality re-
porters in New York got together mained.
in a newspaper library, locked Pol- Polgar, telepithesist and hyp-
gar outside, looked over the shel- notist, is one entertainer who puts
yes of hundreds of volumes and his audience to sleep intentionally.
decided they would have the "ra- Crowds gasp at this mental wizard
dio mind" come in and take a who reads a person's mind, puts
copy of "Who's Who" from its him to sleep and can find any
resting place and open it to a bi- hidden object, including one se-
ography of Alfred E. Smith. He creted under a man's upper plate.
did it.,

Polgar gained national publi-
city when he hypnotized the
Georgia Tech football team the
day before they were to play
Alabama. Georgie Tech won the
game.
When the team lost their game
the following week without Pol-
gar's services, Atlanta papers pro-
claimed, "The team needs Polgar."
POLGAR, WHO lists college
students as his best subjects and
New Yorkers as the most difficult,
has hypnotized approximately 15,-
000 persons to date.
Polgar's extraordinary powers
J-Hop
J-Hop ticket sales will con-
tinue from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. to-
day and tomorrow and from 10
a.m. to noon Saturday in the
Administration Building for
students who have their reser-
vations. General ticket sales will
begin Monday.

Polgar himself has never at-
tempted to explain how he could
have acquired such powers, except
to say that it must be an illis-
tration of the law of compensa-
tion. -
FRATERNITIES
ATTENTION*
J HOP FAVORS AND
PROGRAMS SHOULD BE
ORDERED NOW!
VISIT OUR STORE
OR PHONE FOR AN
APPOINTMENT WITH
OUR REPRESENTATIVE.
BALFOUR'S
1321 South University
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Phone NO 3-1733

U

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The most important sale of the yec
It's our clearance of all fh
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Coats, suits, dresses, skirts, jackets, sweaters,
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Sizes 9-15, 10-44, -12-/2-241
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