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September 23, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-09-23

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIREE

____ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___ ____ ___ __ I1

M

.. .by Ivan N. Kaye

Big Ten Squads
In Heavy Drills
Michigan Stresses Pass Defense
In Workout Before Crown Prince

MANAGER BACK IN '54:
Tigers Give Hutchinson New Contract

AT THIS, THE beginning of what promises to be one of the most
successful athletic years in Michigan history, it might be approp-
riate to set down a fundamental statement on what constitutes the
purpose of intercollegiate athletics.
The underlying purpose of intercollegiate athletics is, contrary
to the ingrained opinions of some, the strengthening of the minds
and bodies of the participants though spirited competition both on an
individual and team basis.
There is great entertainment value in connection with sports,
but of necessity, the first and foremost consideration of purpose
must center around those who participate, and not those who are
spectators.
This underlying purpose has oft-times been overlooked in the
headlong dash toward commercialism which has been the trademark
of mid-century athletics. It should be shouted in the ear of every in-
fluential alumnus, of every critical sportswriter, and of every self-
styled grandstand quarterback that the game belongs to those who
play it, and the only thing that anyone has a right to expect is that
the participants give of themselves to the utmost and derive from
sports the proper rewards of physical and mental soundness.
* * * * *
Something Wrong ..
T IS OBVIOUS that something is drastically wrong with sports as
regards its positing in our society today. Competent men are re-
leased from coaching positions because of failure to win often enough.
Scandals rock college sports, resulting in some cases in discontinu-
ance and the penalizing of future generations for the mistakes of
men whose own lives have been ruined because what should have
been a game was turned into a business.
In short, we need a better athletic orientation, and we need it
quickly, or we will run the risk of presiding over the dissolution of
one of the proudest heritages of American life.
There are those more philosophically inclined among us who
blame for the unhealthy state of mid-century sports a society
which has allowed its overmaterialism to invade even the athletic
scene.
Though this may seem a bit far-fetched to some, it is entirely
within the realm of possibility that the sports world is but a mere re-
flection of the motivating forces that govern society as a whole. If
this is the case, then others will say that we have to reform society
before anything can be done to set the athletic program back on its
intended track. This is not necessarily true, for we find it vastly easier
to control our sports than we do the basic forces which guide our
society, even if they are inter-related.
* * * *
Just Games .. .
F WE CAN ALL find it in ourselves to remember always that athletic
contests are games, and not earth-shaking events which will alter
the course of history, then our outlook will automatically improve.
Let the game we waged with the best that is in us, both as players
and. spectators, but when it is over, let there be no misgivings, no
belittling of men for honest mistakes, and no bitterness, even in de-
feat. When one game is done, all energies should be constructively
mobilized toward the future.
The berating of men who are giving their best in a common
effort is senseless, and only defeats the purpose of athletics.
We here at Michigan, being students at the university with per-
haps the richest tradition in athletics, can do a great deal to return
sports to its rightful and natural position in American life. We can
support our teams to the best of our ability in defeat just as stead-
fastly as in victory. We cat take triumph and setback both in stride,
not, letting either divert us from the more important collegiate goals,
which will be of much greater value in later years.
IN SHORT, we can make of the University of Michigan a model to
the rest of the confused athletic world, by adhering to the simple
rule that sports are only games and should never be accorded a more
dominant position in our pattern of life.
The preceeding thoughts may be slanted along an idealistic line,
but perhaps a little old fashioned idealism is just exactly what the
college sports scene needs.
PENS REPAIRED AT A 0
PEN 115 WEST
HOSPITAL LIBERTY WARREN WERTHEIMER
Sports Night Editor

DETROIT -(WP) -Freddie Hut-1
chinson, who guided the Detroit
Tigers out of the American League
cellar this year, signed a one-year
contract Tuesday to manage the
club again next season.
No salary terms were announced'
but his signing must be considered
a vote of confidence. Earlier in
the season, when the Tigers floun-
dered in last place, there were
rumors that this would be Hutch's
last season.

pulled itself together and moved
out of the cellar and into sixth
place.
The 34-year-old Hutchinson
took over the Tiger reins July 5,
1952, from Red Rolfe, who was
fired. The Tigers finished last
that season for the first time in
history, a sorry 45 games out of
first place. I
It looked as though Detroit
would finish last again this year.
But after acquiring third baseman
Ray Boone from the Cleveland

Indians, the club perked up and
passed both the St. Louis Browns
and the Philadelphia A's to take
sixth place.
With only four games of the
season to go, Detroit is six full
games ahead of the Browns. That
means the Tigers can't finish last.
Hutch, in an effort to help his
team, reinstated himself on the
active player list in the middle of
the season and pitched relief ball
on several occasions.

TONY BRANOFF
*#, ,,veteran defensive back
Major League
Standings

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn 103
Milwaukee 90
St. Louis 82
Philadelphia 81
New York 68
Cincinnati 66
Chicago 63
Pittsburgh 491

LEAGUE
L Pct.
48 .682
61 .594
68 .547
69 .540
82 .453
85 .437
87 .420
102 .325

GB
13
212
34%/
37
391 /,
54

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 9, New York 3
Brooklyn 5, Pittsburgh 4
Cincinnati 1, Chicago 0 (1st)
Chicago 4, Cincinnati 1 (2nd)
Milwaukee 4, St. Louis 3 (1st)
St. Louis 10, Milwaukee 7 (2nd)
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Cincinnati
Milwaukee at St. Louis, night
New York at Philadelphia, night
Only games scheduled
* * *
AMERICAN LEAGUE

With Japan's Crown Prince Aki-
hito looking on, Michigan coach
Bennie Oosterbaan put his charg-
es through a stiff workout, stress-
ing pass defense, in preparation
for the Wolverine's opening game
Saturday with Washington State.
The visiting dignitary from Ja-
pan, watching the workout at his
own request, was treated to a
heavy practice session of contact
work, signal drills and wind
sprints.
* * *
THE MAIN problem facing coach
Oosterbaan is straightening out
the secondary which has to stop
Washington's strong aerial attack
which netted 285 yards against
Colorado Saturday. The brunt of
the Washington passing was done
by quarterback Sandy Lederman
with George Black, a speedy 6-
foot, 5-inch giant, on the receiv-
ing end.
Michigan's defensive back-
field offers only one proven per-
former, sophomore halfback
Tony Branoff, against Washing-
ton's potent aerial game. The
other three-quarters of the
Michigan backfield will consist
of players who spent their time
last year on the offensive pla-
toon.
Linebackers Louis Baldacci and
Dick O'Shaughnessy, defensive
halfback Dick Balzhiser and safe-
ty man Ted Kress will all be mak-
ing their college debuts as defen-
sive players.
* * *
EAST LANSING, Mich. - (P) -
Michigan State tapered off scrim-
mage sessions in, preparation for
Saturday's game at Iowa.
Coach Biggie Munn expressed a
hope the lighter drills will "fresh-
en up" the squad. He said the
players were weary after last
week's tough work.
EVANSTON, Ill.-(M-A rough
offensive and defensive scrimmage
took its toll in minor injuries as
Northwestern polished up for its
Saturday football opener with
Iowa State.
Guard Fred Nosal limped from
the field. Halfbacks Paul Smith

and George Moyers were knocked
out.
* * *

New York
Cleveland
Chicago
Boston
Washington
Detroit
Philadelphia
St. Louis

W
98
89
86
81
75
59
57
54

L
49
61
64
69
74
92
93
97

Pct.
.667
.593
.573
.540
.503
.391
.380
.358

GB
10
131/
181/
24
41
42%
46

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 7, Philadelphia 2
Cleveland 8, Chicago 3
St. Louis '7, Detroit 3
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at Chicago
Philadelphia at New York
Only games scheduled

WAY BACK WHEN:
Michigan's First Football Victory

-

.. ..

By PHIL DOUGLIS
Chicago's White Stocking Park,
once the home of champion base-
ball teams, was also the birth-
place of Michigan football.
For it was here, on a hot May
30th back in 1879, that a green
untested Wolverine eleven smash-
ed a Racine College team into de-
feat to inaugurate the long and
illustrious trail of Michigan foot-
ball history.
*' * *.
THIS WAS not only Michigan's
first game, but it was also the first
recognized intercollegiate football
game ever played west of the Al-
leghenies. The score of this game
is clouded with uncertainty, but it
is known that Michigan scored the
games only touchdown, plus a field
goal, and that Racine scored a
safety.
Some authorities claim the
score was 1-0 in favor of Mich-
igan, others say that the Wolver-
ines won the contest by a '7-2
count. The "University of Michi-
gan Chronicle" of this period
didn't even bother to report a
score at all.

At any rate, the Wolverines won
the game on a touchdown dash by
Irving K. Pond, a gentleman who
later was to be architect for the
Michigan Union and League.
Pond's run for Michigan's initial
touchdown is also obscured by the
mists of time, with some legen-
dary accounts even having him
galloping through stands and
spectators to score.
FIVE HUNDRED fans were on
hand, as the oddly dressed Michi-
gan team, wearing flat-top maize
and blue skull caps, white knee-
breeches, and white high collared
button down jersys fought the Ra-
cine team to a standstill.
The game, which was actually
of rugby variety, was also unique
in that the Michigan goal keep-
er was untested all afternoon.
Pond's legendary touchdown
run, and a field goal by Dave
Detar were enough to send the
Wolverines home victorious.
Meanwhile, back in Ann Arbor,
large crowds set off premature cel-
ebrations, when pranksters sent
in fake telegrams telling of an as

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