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December 17, 1953 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1953-12-17

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1955

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1953

The Lottery
Method
HE OLD ISSUE of Universal Military
Training has come to the fore again, this
time under the new title of National Securi-
ty Training. Presented to President Eisen-
hower by the National Security Train-
ing Commission Monday, the proposed
program provides for training 18-year-olds
concurrently with the drafting of older men
for active duty.
Mainly responsible for the effort to de-
vise a new program, it seems, has been
the unfair recall to active duty of World
War II veterans at the outbreak of the
Korean crisis. Since the veterans were
the only reservists with the necessary
training, they had to bear the brunt of the
police action. As a result, serious morale
problems developed, because younger men
-were drafted under the Selective Service
System's normal standards or went en-
tirely unobligated.
National Security Training attempts to
correct this injustice by providing a train-
ing reserve while maintaining the regular
draft. According to commission reports,
there are enough men for the program to
train 100,000 a year without reducing the
present 3,360,000 of the armed forces.
The plan would have all 18-year-olds draw
lots upon registering with their draft boards
to determine whether they would be trained
for six months or drafted for two years' serv-
ice. Those who were to be drafted would not
be inducted until they became 19 or 20 ac-
cording .to present regulations.
Considering its objectives of providing a
reserve to be ready for an emergency and
of relieving veterans of unfair treatment and
its plan of six months training for 18-year-
olds, the program is a good one. But the
inevitable fly in the ointment is the method
of deciding who shall serve six months and
who shall be delegated to two-year roles.
The lottery method would probably have
many disadvantages. In the first place,
there would undoubtedly be morale prob-
lems because many would consider them-
selves unjustily treated, depending upon
which of two trainings they preferred.
There would be even more uncertainty
about the future for high school graduates
than there now exists. And such a method
could never take into account the innum-
erable factors that should be considered
in the decision, factors that vary with the
individual, such as his college plans or
status.
What is needed in this otherwise accept-
able program is a fair and intelligent method
of determining which type of training would
be best for each person. In the long run, the
lotery method can lead to nothing but con-
fusion and inefficiency, while a more com-
patible system would increase the chances
of creating a'unified, well-trained reserve.
Until a better method is found, the program
should not be adopted.
-Jim Dygert
DREW PEARSON:
* Washington
Merr ywGo-Round
WASHINGTON-Congressman John Blat-
nik, Minnesota Democrat, has returned
from a personal trip to Yugoslavia, Trieste
and Italy-a trip that won't make headlines
but may go a long way toward solving the
tension between Tito and Italy.'
During World War II, Blatnik was a se-
cret American agent in Yugoslavia. He
speaks the native languages fluently and
worked side by side with Yugoslav leadrs
and the people. And what is equally import-
ant, they in turn know him and trust him.
So when Congressman Blatnik had a
private session with Marshal Tito he did
not pull any punches. A few days before

his meeting with Tito, Blatnik had gone to
Trieste and personally studied the situa-
tion. He was alarmed by the mounting
tension and resloved to "talk turkey."
"I told Tito," he told friends later, "that
he would simply have to calm down on the
Trieste issue or there was a good chance the
whole thing will explode out of all control.
"Tito listened intently as I pointed out
that both Italy and Yugoslavia need each
other. Italy needs lumber from you. You
need Italy's fine electrical equipment and
tools. On the military side, Marshal, you
need the protection of bomber bases in Italy
to help fend off any Russian invasion. And
the Italians need you to blunt the edge of
the Russian army.
"As I see the problem," Blatnik told
Tito, "both you and the Italians have got
to get this dispute off the front pages and
take it into the conference room. And
when you talk about Trieste, forget about
all the emotional statements of the past."
"You mean," asked Tito, "that you want
me to yield on a matter of principle?"
"No," replied Blatnik. "I want you to think
of the problem in different terms. In terms
of world peace. In terms of economic pros-
perity. I urge you to abandon ancient pow-
er politics and think in a wholly new set of
terms."
As Blatnik continued his impassioned ap-
peal, Tito began to nod his head in approv-
al.
"Some problems," Blatnik concluded,
"just can't be solved by old methods. The
men who split the atom, for peace as well
as war, wereall young men-most of them
under thirty vears olda: nd thev brou-ht

U+ ART +

UNTIL DECEMBER 20TH, the University
Museum of Art features "50 Years of
Picasso" in the North and South Galleries
of Alumni Memorial Hall. For all their mod-
est scope, these prints constitute what will
probably prove to be the most exciting exhib-
it of the school year.
It is always true that a study of his
drawings contributes greatly to the un-
derstanding of the artist, and Picasso's
etchings are a case in point. The more
complicated the medium, the greater the
distance between artist and observer, or,
for that matter, between the artist and his
creation, because of the proportionately
larger amount of energy wasted in me-
chanical and problematic functions.
Because of its simplicity, drawing permits
the immediate transfer of the aesthetic im-
pulse to the page, before cogitation has been
allowed to dull the first flush of enthusiasm.
More is required, of course; if the result is
to have value, it needs, in addition to poetic
intuition, the technical ability to communi-
cate it. Picasso combines the two probably
better than aynone since Michelangelo.
On communication in art, much has been
said, and the best observations on the sub-
ject are largely ignored or misunderstood.
There is a confusion among even the most
learned on this score, and courses in "fine"
arts are still taught almost entirely on his-
torical-anecdotal principles, or lack of prin-
ciple. The compassionate souls who shed a
conspicuous tear for the hard lot of a Van
Gogh among his contemporaries are cut
from the same burlap as the people they
condemn. "The abuse poor Vincent suffered,
friends," one hears from the sort of person
who snorts at the work of a contemporary, or
at best begs the question. "We haven't the
proper perspective to evaluate the present,"
is the plea, and another Van Gogh is left
for future generations to weep on.
And still there is no communication,
except of accepted tastes. Picasso has liv-
ed long enough to reap some of the bene-.
fits he has earned, but I often wonder
whether he wouldn't rather be understood
than be the recipient of conformist
praises. I don't suppose he cares much,
and there is no reason why he should.
Although the imagination is unbounded,
the choice of a particular medium imposes
certain restrictions, more or less eradicable.
In literature, difference in language is the
most obvious barrier, partly surmountable in
translation. This linguistic difficulty is no
obstacle in any of the other arts, and one
might suppose that dravings, for example,
would be more accessible to the world at
large, and more fully appreciated. Yet I
dare say more copies of almost any popular
historical novel are sold each year than
could an unidentified Picasso etching at the
same price.
* * * *
THE COMMON fallacy is to suppose that
all art must communicate on a verbal
level. Why an artist who works in line, color,
form, etc., should combine these qualities
into a literary message escapes my attention.
The painter may, if he chooses, aim at 'some-
thing of the sort as a subordinate objective,
but the quality of his work in no way depends
on its historical-anecdotal recognizability.
Yet nine persons in 10 will prefer any ghast-
ly daubing that clearly represents the flight
into Egypt over the best etching Picasso has
done.
If Picasso represented a radical depar-
ture, there might be some justification for
calling him obscure, but no one has his
roots more firmly planted in western tra-
dition. He borrows more freely than
Shakespeare, and with as happy results;
DR1
At Lydia Mendelssohn..
ARTS THEATER
"LEAVE God and me alone!" So speaks
patient Mr. Noah, the Lord's best ser-

vent, in the Arts Theater's new production
last evening at Lydia Mendelssohn play-
house. This is the second play by the French
poet, Andre Obey, which Strowan Robertson
has directed out here in Ann Arbor. Only,
the similarity between Noah and the Rape
of Lucretia stops right there.
Obey seems to know what he's doing when
he writes a play; like the sculptor Giacom-
metti he is cutting down, cutting down till
the piece is the barest bone. There is some
wit in the play, and a good lot of obvious
profundities. I don't mean to be blase, but
I'm not at all certain that what might have
been charming if this production had gone
off well deserves even so much benefit of
doubt.
Bernard Tone is for the third time this
season playing the Patriarch, and by now
he has it down pat: he rattles the false
teeth, shakes in proper palsy, cackles, and
rags the irresponsible youths he has un-
fortunately to suffer from for having
sired, all in a good job of acting; and he
is an excellent speaker. Mrs. Noah, Tresa
Hughes, who is gifted with a beautiful
nasal contralto is also pleasant to listen to.
The three unregenerate sons of old man
Noah, Ham, Shem and Japhet, played by
John Bennes, Herbert King and Gerry
miahnr.. . a -n Anna rrli n -as it

he goes for inspiration to stone-age cave
paintings, to Hellenic Greece, to Egypt,
to China, and anywhere he can find some-
thing useful. Ile borrows from literature,
from mythology, history, and psychology
when it suits him. For all his exploration
and experimentation, he remains essential-
ly a classicist, and whoever cannot recog-
nize this understands nothing.
Quite simply, the aesthetic experience is
direct, intuitive, or what you will, so long as
you recognize that reason and logic have no
share in it. Whoever cannot brush aside
preconceptions before passing judgment on a
work of art- must seriously cultivate either
innocence or silence. There may be extra-
aesthetic qualities for which a work of art
may be appreciated, and there usally are,
but the artist is in no way obliged to provide
them.
Although the simplest things are often the
most beautiful, simplicity is suspect. It looks
too easy, hence must be either slight or bo-
gus. Yet economy is as important a prin-
ciple in art as in other things. Who has not
at one time or other smiled to see a bumbler
waste four or five hours on a job that he
himself can perform in two? So in art-that
is best which conveys the most with the
least; a thing may be complex and still good,
but the difference between them is as be-
tween poetry and prose. Most of Picasso's
work exhibits perfectly this poetic parsimo-
ny. When perspective and shading only cloud
the vision in an attempt to mirror the exter-
nal and secondary qualities of life, they must
be dispensed with. This Picasso does, whth-
er working in line alone, or with the addition
of color-unless, of course, he chooses to do
otherwise.
Consistency in art is a dubious virtue,
and Picasso often forsakes classical purity
and economy to venture into the baroque
style. Concision may be preferred to over-
statement for the most part, but exagger-
ation has its uses too. Ultimately, the
worth of a style is judged on the same ba-
sis as that of a functional product; if it
works, it is good. Picasso almost always
makes it go, and even his darkest etchings,
on close inspection, show the same struc-
tural efficiency as his work in the other
extreme.
The power of Picasso's pieces is obvious
even without knowledge of their philosophic
meanings and- implications, but understand-
ing of their significance adds to the impact,
provided that the subject matter is not al-
lowed to smother the aesthetic basis. No
amount of philosophy alone, however sound,
can produce art. Picasso's recurring male
and female symbols, the almost unchanging
movement of vitality from east to west, and
the other symbolic repetitions, are import-
ant and significant, but by themselves would
be as nothing to what Picasso has made of
them. His chief preoccupation is with the
process of life, in its various manifestations,
and his occasional concern with actual events
is always subordinate to his broader obser-
vations of principles. Consequently, his mes-
sage is universal rather than specific.
What is so wonderful about this unpre-
tentious gathering of prints is that every
piece reveals many aspects of art and crea-
tion, and provides countless themes worthy
of detailed development. Picasso is poet,
painter, philosopher; in short, a great art-
ist. His combination of delicacy and vitality
provides an excitement of intensity and dur-
ation unmatched by any artist of his time.
I apologize for the inadequacy of these im-
pressionistic observations; like Eliot's
Sweeney, "I gotta use words when I talk to
you." Picasso needn't, so I refer you to him.
-Siegfried Feller
kMA
tioning the rest of the cast because, though
I cannot find much they did pleasant, I
cannot find it in my heart to be terribly
displeased with them. They tried; as did
Magnuson, who wrote the incidental score,

Schniewind, who did something with the
light, Miss Miller with her dances, and so
on.
But, the production didn't seem to be
ready. The sets were cumbersome, unimagi-
native; I cannot think they were much good,
since they needed the best part of forty-five
minutes to break down and rig during in-
termissions, and that doesn't make an au-
dience easy when the message of a play is
to teach miserable captious mankind the
virtue of patience. No, the production was
not paced to delight or surprise by its crafty
simplicity. And then again, very likely Obey
was really oversimple.
After all, despite all the possible faults of
a poor production, I would like to be able at
least to expatiate on the merit of the play,
but I'm afraid it wasn't a very good choice.
Noah, the Medieval morality play, is coarse
boorish slapstick; we moderns, on the other
hand, have some supersubtle theologians
writing our plays, and audiences who have
the sophistication, I think, to be edifiied
through civilized humor. But Obey leaves too
much to Noah; so the other sixteen members
of the cast are not much more than super-
numeraries. Mr. Robertson, the director, also
wishes to edify us; his job, as he well knows,
is to do it through good art. Why then, when

"We Can't Subpeta Him. I Think He's On Our Staff"
- \ ? A
J !
D 1A I L Y O F FI P CI A L B U L L E T IN tE
SC-

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALT'1
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL, OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 18 to January 28
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
EDITOR'S NOTE-Officials have reported that extra
copies of this examination schedule will not be printed for
distribution.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that in case of a conflict the conflict '
is arranged for by the class which conflicts with the regular
schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.

I

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

(Continued from Page 2)
The deadline for receipt of applica-
tions for RESEARCH CLUB GRANTS-
IN-AID has been extended to Jan. 18.
Applications may still be obtained at
the offices of the Graduate School.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS.
The Kentucky State Department of
Health has announced an examination
for Inspector VII for the Home Acci-
dent Prevention Section of the Depart-
ment. Requirements include a college
degree with a major in Engineering
or Public Health plus 4 years of exper-
ience in Sanitary Inspection work. (Ai
Master's degree may he substituted for
1 year's experience.) Application must
be filed no later than Dec. 27, 1953.
The Tennessee Valley Authority,
Knoxville, Tenn., needs Civil, Mechani-
cal, Electrical, Chemical, and Archi-
tectural Engineering and Architectural
graduates to assist in the design, con-
struction, and operation of hydro-elec-
tric and steam generating plants.
The U. S. Civil Service Commission
has announced an examination for Ac-
countants to fill positions as Internal
Revenue Agents, GS-7, and Specialr
Agents (Tax Fraud), GS-7, in the In-
ternal Revenue Service of the Treasury
Dept.
For further information about these
and other employment opportunities,
contact the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration Bldg., Ext. 371.
PERSONNEL, INTERVIEWS DURING
JANUARY 1954.
The following companies will have
representatives at the Bureau of Ap-
pointmentsto interview February and
June graduates during the month of
January: Equitable Life Insurance Co.
Of Iowa, Denham & Co. (Detroit adver-
tising agency), Aeroquip Corp. (Jack-
son), Kroger Co. (Detroit), Penn Mu-
tual Life Insurance Co., Canada Life
Assurance Co., and Montgomery Ward
(Detroit). See the Daily Official Bulletin
on January 5 for more details.
SUMMER GRADUATE STUDENT PRO-
GRAM.
The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory
(University of California) in Los Ala-
maos, New Mexico, is announcing its
summer employment program for grad-
uate students majoring in the follow-
ing sciences: Physics; Chemistry, other
than organic; Mathematics and Theo-
retical Physics; Electrical, Mechanical,
and Metallurgical Engineering. Grad-
uate students or students who havej
received their undergraduate degreesl
and intend to continue withadvanced
studies are invited to apply for this;
program. Applications must be filed by
Feb. 1, 1954. Application forms and fur-
ther information are available at the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin-
istration Building.
Academic Notices
Seminar in Applied Mathematics will
meet Thurs., Dec. 17, at 4 in 247 West
Engineering. Speaker: Dr. R. K. Ritt.
Topic: Theory of Distributions.
Course 401, the Interdisciplinary Sem-
inar in the Application of MathematicsI
to the Social Sciences, will meet on
Thurs., Dec. 17, at 4 p.m. in 3409 Mason
Hall. Mr. William Hays of the Psychol-
ogy Department will speak. His topic
will be "On Kinship Systems."
The Department of Biological Chem-
istry will hold a seminar in 319 West
Medical Building at 4 p.m., on Thurs.,
Dec. 17, The topic for discussion will
be "Recent Studies Related to Trypto-
phan Metabolism," conducted by Dr.
Merle Mason.

Doctoral Examination for Ann Filing-
er Neel, Psychology; thesis: "The Nature
of Defensive Behavior asaStudied by
IPerceptual Distortion," Sat., Dec. 19,
7611 Haven Hall, at 1 p.m. Chairman,
H. L. Raush.
Doctoral Examination for Howard
David Tait, Fisheries; thesis: "Sampling
Problems in the Michigan Creel Cen-
sus," Friday, December 18, 2124CNat-
ural Science Bldg., at 8:30 am. Chair-
man, K. F. Lagler.

MONDAY
TUESDAY

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Tuesday, January 26
Monday, January 18
Wednesday, January 20
Saturday, January 23
Monday, January 18
Monday, January 25
Thursday, January 28
Thursday, January 21
Monday, January 18
Wednesday, January 27
Tuesday, January 19
Friday, January 22
Monday, January 25
Thursday, January 28
Thursday, January 21
Saturday, January 23

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

'

4

Events Today

Le Cercle F1rancais. La p'tite causette
will meet this afternoon from 3:30
to 4:00 p~m. only in the MichiganI
Union cafeteria. At 4:00 p.m., a film I
on Andre Gide will be shown in Rm.
3B of the Union. Everyone is welcome!
Christian Science Organization. Tes-
timonv meeting tonight at 7:30 p.m.,
Fireside Room, Lane Hall. All are wel-
come.
Kappa Phi. The Christmas program
will be meld today at 5:15 at the Meth-
odlist church. All active~s and pledges are{
requested to come.
M.C.1. will go caroling today from
7 to 8:30 p.m.; pack clothes for the
S.R.A. "Clothe a Child Drive" for
Korea from 8:30 to 9:30; and have re-
freshments at thewhome of Dr. and
Mrs. Gordon Van Wylen following the
packing party. Meet at Lane Hall.
International Center Weekly Tea will
'be held this afternoon from 4:30 to 6
at the International Center.
The Political Science Round Table
will meet this evening in the Rack-
ham Amphitheater at 7:45 p.m. Pro-
' fessor Arthur W. MacMahon, of Co-
lumbia University, will speak on "The
Administration of Foreign Relations."
All interested persons are invited.
Graduate Record Concert. The weekly
Graduate Record Concert will be held
this evening at 8 p.m. in the West
Lounge of the Rackham Building.
The program will consist of Bach's
Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F
(Munchinger) and Beethoven's Ninthj
Symphony croscanini). All graduate
students welcome.
IThe Congregational-Disciples Guild.
Mid-week Meditation in Douglas Chapel,
5:00-5:30 p.m. Freshman Discussion
Group at Guild House. 7:00-8:00 p.m.
Arts Chorale Caroling Party. We meet
at Auditorium .D, Angell Hall this even-
ing at 7 p.m. Bring warm clothes,I
flashlights, and any guests who would
like to come along. Hot chocolate aft-
erwards at Club 600. Come prepared for
a good time.
Coming Events
Beacon. Christmas party, Fri., Dec.
18, Michigan League, 8 p.m.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Tea
from 4 to 5:30 at Canterbury House,
Fri., Dec. 18, followed by student-led
Evening Prayer in the Chapel of St.
Michael and All Angels. All students in-
vited.
S y u Y
Sixty-Fourth Year

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Psychology 31
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31
Zoology 1
Botany 1, 2, 122
Chemistry 3
Sociology 51, 54, 60
Political Science 1
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54

Monday, January 18
Tuesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 20
Wednesday, January 20
Friday, January 22
Friday, January 22
Saturday, January 23
Tuesday, January 26
Tuesday, January 26
Wednesday, January 27

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Drawing 3
English 11
MIE 136
CE 23, 151
Drawing 2
EE 4, 5
EM 1,2
PE 11, 13
CM 124
Drawing 1
MIE 135
CE 21, 22
Chemistry<
PE 31, 32,
Economics

Monday, January 18
Monday, January 18
Monday, January 18
Monday, January 18
Tuesday, January 19
Tuesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 20
Thursday, January 21
Thursday, January 21
Friday, January 22
Friday, January 22
Saturday, January 23
Saturday, January 23
Tuesday, January 26
Wednesday, January 27

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

3
131
53, 54

1

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 3044 East Engineer-
ing Building between January 4 and January 12 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will begiven for
all applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of
examinations, see bulletin board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
SCHOOLOF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

I

Edited and managed by students of
Doctoral Examination for Jacob J. the University of Michigan under the
Lamberts, Linguistics; thesis: "The authority of the Board in Control of
Dialect of Cursor Mundi (Cotton MS
Vespasian A III)," Thurs., Dec. 17,
East Council Room, Rackham Bldg., at Editorial Staff
2 p.m. Chairman, Hans Kurath.
Harry Lunn..........Managing Editor
Doctoral Examination for Thomas Eric Vetter..................Cty Editor
Mann Oelrich, Zoology; thesis: "The Virginia Voss......... Editorial Director
Anatomy of the Head of Ctenosaura Mike Wolff ........Associate City Editor,
pectinatat(Iguanidae)," Thurs., Dec. Alice B. Silver.. Assoc. Editorial Director
17, 2089 Natural Science Bldg., at 2 p.m. Diane Decker.. .....Associate Editor
Chairman, A. H. Stockard. Helene Simon...........Associate Editor
Ivan Kaye.................Sports Editor
Doctoral Examination for Roy Newell Paul Greenberg. Assoc. Sports Editor{
Jervis, Botany; thesis: "A Summary of !Marilyn Campbell.Women's Editorj
the Genus Gochnatia Including a Re- Kathy Zeisler.Assoc. Women's Editor
vision of the West Indian Species which Don Campbell.. Head Photographerj
Comprise the Section Anastraphioides,"
Fri., Dec. 18, 1139 Natural Science Bldg., Business St
at 9 a.m. Chairman, H. H. Bartlett. u
Thomas Treeger...Business Manager
Doctoral Examination for Julius William Kaufman Advertising Manager
Mathew Hill, Education; thesis: "Fac- Harlean Hankin.... Assoc. Business Mgr.
tors Influencing the Effect of 'Correc- William Seiden...... Finance Manager
tive' Information about One's Apti- James Sharp.....Circulation Manager
tudes on Change in Vocational Inter-]
est," Fri., Dec. 18, 2532 University Ele- Telephonie NO 23-24-1j
mentary School, at 10 a.m. Chairman,
E. S. Bordin.

A.

._ _ i

Xettej4
TO THE EDITOR.
Early Fall Semester.. .
WITH shock and horror I read
of the decision to recommend
an early fall semester to the
Deans' Conference as a solution to
the June final problem. This move
would be a blow to the right of
- I -r-n 4,rf n .ri t n i

If the student should overcome
this handicap he would be faced
with other problems. He would lose,
two or three weeks earning which
in many cases is a full year's tui-
tion plus. Resort jobs are very ex-
hausting and the studehts would
have a choice of quitting still ear-
lier for a few days rest or come
back to school in a less receptive
condition than his counterpart
who spend the summer in vaca-
tion. If money is a real question he
will have to work while in school.
further handicapping him.
This situation will help to de-
crease the number of students who

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