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December 10, 1953 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-10

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PAGE TWO

TIHE MICHIGANT DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1953

mom

PEACETIME PARATROOPERS:

'U"'Students Fight Fires

By RUPERT CUTLER
Smokejumpers are paratroopers
of peace, fighting on the flaming
battle lines of forest fires.
Four students, Bob Spinde, '54
NR, Billy Buck, '54NR, Ed Heik-
kenen, '56NR, and Bob Clifford,
NR, spent their summer vacation
at this hazardous occupation.
* * *
WORKING FOR the U.S. For-
est Service; the four men made a
total of 50 jumps from high-fly-
ing tri-motor airplanes into the
remote and almost inaccessible
forests of the Rocky Mountains
and the Cascades of the Pacific
coast.
The smokejumping service
was organized in 1940 on an ex-
perimental basis. In 1947, men
began to be trained and station-
ed at five bases: Caves Junction,
Ore.; McCall, Idaho; Winthrop,
Wash.; Missoula, Mont.; and
Idaho City, Idaho.
Smokejumpers are dropped on
fires that are usually no larger
than 10 acres. However, Spinde,
working out of McCall, was on a
500-acre Mosquito Springs fire in
Idaho. For 13 days he was with-
Health Service
Report Made
Student health last month was'
reported to be good, and much the
same as for the month of Novem-
ber last year, according to a recent
Health Service report.
This year, general influenza in-
jections for all students on cam-
pus were discontinued, because
their value in past years was nev-
er conclusively decided.
Accidents this year appear to
be on the increase. A total of 4251
student injuries have been record-
ed since October.
Help Fight TB
BUy Christmas Seals
ENDING TODAY

SMOKEJUMPER

out the luxuries of a toothbrush
or a change of socks.
BUCK, STATIONED at Caves
Junction, made three fire jumps
and Heikkenen and Clifford, bas-
ed at Idaho City, counted 15
jumps between them. The men
are flown into the fires but must
hike back to civilization when
they are sure the fire is out.
Smokejumpers help protect 20,-
000,000 acres of roadless moun-
tain forest where 70-90 per cent
of the fires are caused by light-
ning, in contrast to the national
total where 93 per cent of forest
fires are caused by man.
Prior to the organization of the
smokejumpers, as many as 300,000
forested acres burned a year.
Since their inception, the average
annual burn on the National For-
ests has been reduced to less than
7,000 acres.
Inalcik To Discuss
Turkey and Islam
"Turkey and Islam" will be the
topic of a lecture by Prof. Halil
Inalcik at 4:15 p.m. today in
Rackham Amphitheater.
Prof. Inalcik, originally an in-
structor of Ottoman history at the
University of Ankara, Ankara,
Turkey, is now teaching at Co-
lumbia University.
The lecture, sponsored by the
Department of Near Eastern Stu-
dies, is open to the public.

Exhibition
On Crime
Open Now
By SHIRLEY KLEIN
"POEM occasioned by the most
shocking and cruel murder . . .,"
reads the headline of a broadside
now on exhibit along with other
"Assortments of American Crime"
in the Clements Library.
Broadsides, single sheets of a
criminal's last words before exe-
cution or a confession of a mur-
derer, were put out by enterpris-
ing 'printers to make a few extra
dollars.
* * *
AN. EXAMPLE currently being
shown at the library concerns the
tragedy of a husband who killed
his family and then committed su-
icide in Connecticut in 1782. The
sheet is crudely illustrated with
six coffins and a skull and cross-
bones and a black "mourning bor-
der" runs about the sheet. "I re-
alize it isn't exactly appropos dur-
ing the Christmas season," How-
ard H. Peckham, director of the
Library, volunteered.
"However, I believe there is
some ground for optimism,"
Peckham commented. "For one
thing you will see no new type
of crime, and some old crimes
have passed out of existence--
piracy, witchcraft and aiding
fugitive slaves."
The assortment, on exhibit un-
til about March 1, also includes
the original letter sent by Bene-
dict Arnold to the British head-
quarters offering to surrender
WestPoint and his troops for 20,-
000 pounds of sterling. (That sum
would be worth about one-half
million dollars today.) The letter
is coded to a dictionary with num-
bers in series of threes. The first
number is the page in the dic-
tionary, the second the column
and the third the number of lines
from the top of the dictionary
page.
* * *
THE CONSTITUTION of a
county horse thief detecting so-
ciety, common well into the nine-
teenth century, is included in the
exhibit. The stealing of horses
was a serious crime on the fron-
tier where the animals were valu-
able.
Belief in witches caused the
practice of witchcraft to be con-
sidered a crime. The witchhunt
which hit New England in the
1690s was finally halted by Bos-
ton merchant, John Calef, in 1700.
"TRYALS of Several Witches
Lately Executed in New England"
are a part of the collection being
shown.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication In It Is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices shouldbe sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1953
VOL. LXIV, No. 66
Notices
1954 Parking Permits. Due to manu-
facturing difficulties, permits will not
be available until December 15. Sorry.
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary
Late Permission. By action of the
Student Affairs Committee, all women
students will have 1:30 a.m. late per-
mission on Sat., Dec. 12.
Naval Reserve Officer's Training Corps
Testing Program will be given on Sat.
Dec. 12. Candidates taking this exam-
ination are requested to report to 100
Hutchins Hall at 8:45 a.m.
The Fund for the Advancement of
Education( Ford Foundation) announces
a program of Faculty Fellowships for
1954-55. These fellowships are available
in the Humanities, the Social Sciences,
and the Natural Sciences. They are in-
tended for candidates between the ages
of 30 and 45, who have been teaching
steadily for several years, and will pay
a grant approximately equivalent to
the salary of 'the recipient for the aca-
demic year plus certain necessary ex-
penses. The primary purpose of the
awards is to enable teachers to broaden
Stheir qualifications for teaching their
respective fields as part of a program of
liberal education. They are not intend-
ed to support private and individual re-
search projects except as these bear
directly on, or are subordinate to, the
effort to improve the candidate's teach-
ing. Each applicant will be asked to
submit a plan for the year, explaining
how it will increase his teaching effec-
tiveness.
The University is authorized to nom-
inate four candidates each of whom will
be eligible for reappointment to the
teaching staff ina1955-56. Because of
the small number of appointments, each
Department may propose not more than
one candidate. Departmental nominees
may secure application blanks at the
Office of the Graduate School. Since ap-
plications must be sent in to the Foun-
dation by January. 31, it is requested
that applications be filed in the Grad-
uate School Office not later than Jan-
uary 11 to permit time for review by
the Executive Board of the Graduate
School and nominations by the Uni-
versity.
The Ford Foundation, in keeping with
its policy of supporting activities
which may contribute to international
understanding, isinitiating a program
of scholarships and fellowships for
young men and women of ability who
wish to begin or continue study of the
Soviet Union or the peripheral Slavic
and East European areas.
The Foundation expects to make
awards of three types. These will be
Graduate Area Training Scholarships,
Pre - doctoral Area Research - Training
Scholarships, Pre-doctoral Area Re-
search-Training Fellowships, and Post-
doctoral Area Research-Training Fellow-
ships.
Awards will be available for study of
earlier periods, as well as of the modern
era. Awards will be made only to citi-
zens of the United States and aliens
permanently residing indthe Unied
States who can give evidence of their
intention to become citizens. Stipends
will be fixed according to individual
need.
Further information on the eligibility
of applicants may be obtained from the
fellowships office- at the Graduate
School. For both information and appli-
cations write The Ford Foundation,
Overseas Training and Research, 575
Madison Avenue, New York 22, New
York.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS.
Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Michigan,
will have a representative at the Bureau
of Appointments on Tues., Dec. 15, to
talk with interested February LS&A
and Bus. Ad. graduates for the firm's
Sales Training Program. Candidates
should have two years of some science
background, at least one year of which
should be in chemistry. June graduates
are also acceptable if the schedule per-
mits. Call Ext. 371 to make an appoint-
ment.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS.
Alcorn A. & M. College, Alcorn, Mis-
sissippi, is looking for an Accountant
for a position with the school as Pur-

chasing Agent. February graduates are
eligible to apply.
The U.S. Civil Service Commission has
announced an examination for Geolo-
gist, Grades GS-5 and GS-7. Vacancies
to be filled from this test exist in the
Departments of Interior, Agriculture,
and Army. Graduates with a degree in
geology or students who expect to com-
plete their degree by June may take
the examination. The closing date for
applications is Dec. 15.
The National Seal Co., Van Wert,
Ohio, a manufacturer of oil seals, is in-
terested in hiring a Mechanical Engi-
neer 'for a trainee program, followed by

permanent assignment in the Engineer-
ing Department of the company.
The New York State Employment
Service is asking 1954 college graduates,
residing in the Rochester, N.Y. area, to
register with the Service during the
Christmas holidays. Interviews with,
Rochesterremployers may then be ar-
ranged for the spring vacation.
For further information concerning
these and other employment opportuni-
ties, contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Administration Bldg., Ext.
371.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
English Department, "The Liberal Imag-
ination," Professor Arthur M. Mizener
of Cornell University, author of the bi-
ography of F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Far
Side of Paradise. Thurs.. Dec. 10, 4:151
p.m., Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
University Lecture, auspices of the
Department of Near Eastern Studies,
Dr. Halil Inalcik, Professor of Ottoman1
History, Columbia University, "Turkey
and Islam," Thurs., Dec. 10, 4:15 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheater.
University Lecture. Dr. T. C. Schneir-
la, Curator of the American Museum of
Natural History, Department of Animalj
Behavior, will give a University Lecture
at 4:15, Fri., Dec. 11, in Auditorium C,
Angell Hall, on "Studies in Animal
"Instinct.''
The Following Student Sponsored So-
cial Events are approved for the com-
ing week-end. Social chairmen are re-
minded that requests for approval for
social events are due in the Office ofj
Student Affairs not later than 12 o'clock
noon on the Monday prior to the event.
December 11,1953:
Alpha Delta Pi
Alpha Gamma Delta
Alpha Xi Delta
Beta Theta Pi
Collegiate Sorosis
Delta Theta Phi
Gamma Phi Beta
Jordan Hall
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Martha Cook
Michigan Christian Fellowship
Pi Beta Phi
Pi Lambda Phi
Phi Delta Phi.
Phi Sigma Delta
Public Health Club
Tau Delta Phi
Theta Xi
Zeta Beta Tau1
December 12, 1953
Alpha Chi Omega
Alpha Delta Phi
Alpha Epsilon Pi
Alpha Kappa Kappa
Alpha Phi
Alpha Rho Chi
Alpha Sigma Phi
Betsy Barbour Res.1
Chi Phi
Delta Chi
Delta Sigma Delta
Delta Sigma Phi
Delta Sigma Pi .
Delta Tau Deltar
Delta Theta Phir
Hinsdale House, E. Q.
Kappa Sigmaj
Nelson International House
Phi Delta Phi
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 tc 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
t 3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 overage words to o line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-RED BILL FOLD, containing ID
card, driver's license, social security
card, and money. Lost Friday night
on campus. Reward! Phone NO 3-1561,
Extension 54. )75A
LOST-Men's Class Ring, near U. Mu-
seums. Call NO 3-1561 Mosher, Ext.
214. Reward! )74A
LOST-One red billfold. Reward. Please
call NO 3-1516, 363 Jordan. )76A
FOR SALE
1948 HUDSON -4-door, Commodore 8,
radio, heater, and good transporta-
tion. New rubber. Huron Motor Sales.
Phone NO 2-3163. )202B
BRAND NEW Webcor phonograph and
tape recorder. Excellent buy. Call
NO 3-0521. Extension 627. )88B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. 114B
1952 FORD CUSTOM FORDOMATIC.
Radio, heater, continental kit, 2,000
actual miles. It's loaded with acces-
sories! Huron Motor Sales. Phone
NO 2-3163. )203B
OUR CHRISTMAS TREE
is available to you for making your
personalized photographic Christmas
cards. You may use your own camera
ior ours) and we will furnish the
lighting and helpful suggestions.
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 S. Uni-
versity. Phone NO 8-6972.
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
)186B
RADIO-PHONOGRAPH table combina-
tion, 3-speed changer. $60. NO 32554.
1947 CHEVROLET AERO-SEDAN, 2-door
black, radio, heater, one owner. Sharp-
est '47 Chevrolet in the state! Huron
Motor Sales. NO 2-3163. )204B
DOUBLE COIL SPRINGS-$8.00; Steel
Folding Cot without mattress, $8.00.
Hostess chair, good springs, needs up-
holstering, $1.00. Two large side-
boards, $10 each. Large walnut ve-
neer table, and five chairs, $20.00.
Coal hot water heater, $5.00. Swervil
top chrome stool, $4.00. Phone NO
2-9020.
1950 FORD-6-Radio, heater, blue, very
sharp. Ask for Smitty. Huron Motor
Sales. NO 2-3163. )205B
SIAMESE KITTENS-Two females and
one male. Phone NO 2-9020. )188B
BABY PARAKEETS-Various colors, $8
each. New and used cages and bird
supplies. Mrs. Ruffins. 562 S. 7th.
)196B
1951 HENRY J:-Green 2-door, 6 cylinder
with overdrive. One owner. Ask for
Smitty. Huron Motor Sales. Phone
NO 2-3163. )206B

FOR SALE
BABY PARAKEETS and breeders, sing-
ing canaries, cages, supplies. 305 West
Hoover. Call NO 2-2403. )195B
'39 PLYMOUTH-Radio, heater and anti
freeze. Runs good. $75. Call Ken at
NO 3-4488. )211B
FOR SALE-1947 2-door Plymouth, very
clean. $500. NO 8-7651 after 3:00 p.m.
)210B
RALEIGH BICYCLES-Man's, Woman's,
3-speeds, lights, $38 and $35. Call
NO 3-0564 after 6 p.m. )209B
1948 KAISER - Good condition, radio
and heater, reasonable. NO 2-3036.
)208B
CHRISTMAS TREES - $1.50 up. Drive
in, free parking. Pontiac Rd. at RR
track, one block west of Broadway
signal light. ) 213E
24x3i PACEMAKER SPEED GRAPHIC
with Graflex flashgun. Call Betsy
Smith at NO 2-2591. )217B
ARGUS C-3, like new. Call Paul after
6:00. . )215B
TUXEDO KUPPENHEIMER - Size 40,
worn once. Phone NO 8-7034. )214B
1939 FORD COUPE-Four year old mo-
tor, new battery and muffler. Excel-
lent runabout. One owner. NO 2-7014.
)216B
HOCKEY SKATES-One pair, size 11.
Good condition, $5.00. NO 2-8517. 0,
FOR RENT
FURNISHED campus apartment, 3
rooms and bath for 2-3 men. $100.
Phone NO 3-8454. )18C
PERSONAL
WANTED-Female Student remaining in
Ann Arbor Christmas Vacation. Room
and board in exchange for baby sitting
services. Phone NO 2-9850. , )45F
? EUROPE?
Thinking of a tour next summer?
We have a good one that will be com-
posed mostly of Michigan Students!
Call Tom Leopold or Ruedi Gingrass
at NO 2-3256. )46F
TRANSPORTATION
HURRY-Probably last chance to sign
up for drive-away cars for Xmas Va-
cation. California, Washington, New
York area, Florida; Texas. Gas and
oil. Will be on Union 3rd floor lobby
Wed. and Thurs., Dec. 9 and 10 2:30-
5:30, or write Anthony. Ringold, 328
Thomson. Guaranteed results. Free.
)27G
WANTED-Riders to go West Dec. 18, by
highway 30 to Idaho. Call Gary at
Ypsi 5498 between 3 and 6. )28G
WANTED-Ride to N.Y. between Dec.
20th and 24th. Mrs. Waldecker, MSNC,
Jones Hall. Phone 4351. )29G

HELP WANTED
STUDENT To wait table for meals.
Phone NO 2-6422. )46H
CARRIERS for The Michigan Daily.
Early morning hours. Excellent pay.
Openings now and next semester. Call
Circulation Dept., NO 23-24-1.
WANTED-Young lady for part time
work at soda fountain. Swift's Drug
Store. 340d . StateSt. PhoneNO
2-0534. )53H
WANTED-PIANO PLAYER, for Friday
and Saturday nights, male or female,
$20 per night. Apply at Sid Abel's
Bar & Lounge, 15757 Livernois, De-
troit. )54H
WANTED - One waiter for fraternity
board job. Must have 11 o'clocks free.
No experiencenecessary. Call Gene
Haibrook, NO 2-3256. )55H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWR1'ERSI Portable and Standard
for rent, sales and service.
MORRILLS
314 State St., Phone NO 8-7177
HOME TYPING-All kinds by profes-
sional secretary. Fast, accurate ser-
vice. Reasonable, rates. Campus lo-
cation. 820 E. University. Phone NO
8-7391. )171
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable bervice
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1214 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
AI blocks east of Ibast Eng. )3I
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-
up and delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. )21
YOUNG MAN, M.A. 1 yr. PhD., English,
U. of M. Now working in engineering
research. Would like to work at home
editing, arts, science, literature, ad-
vertising, ghost-writing, secretarial
services. NO 2-8257. )23I
TYPING SERVICE-Manuscripts, thesis,
etc. Reasonable rates. Call NO 2-7605.
)241
MISCELLANEOUS
THE FALL ISSUE OF GENERATION is
now on sale at the Union, League,
and local bookstores.
GIFTS for every age, every interest, and
EVERY POCKETBOOK. Student Peri-
odical, NO 5-1843. )18L.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

'3

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U

HILL AUDITORIUM

SUN., DEC. 13, 8:00 P.M.

k

NOWC
HIST)ORI P

ORPH EUM

THURS.-FRI. 6:30
SAT.-SUN 1:30
60c

"LET'S DO IT AGAIN"

I

JANE WYMAN
RAY MILLAND

I

I

NIGHTLY THRU DEC. 13 . .
A PI OF PLOYS
SHOW OF WONDERS MANDRAGOLA
An Interlude a Comedy
by Cervantes by Machiavelli
The Arts Theater
209 1' E. Washington Phone NO 8-7301
Coming Dec. 16
"NOAH"
THE CHRISTMAS SEASON PRODUCTION
of the Arts Theater
AT LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER
Cinema SL quid
PRESENTS
THE GUNFIGHTER

CHICAGO SYMPHONY
FRITZ REINER, Conductor
NAN MERRIMAN, Soloist
Tickets: $3.00, $2.50, $2.00, $1.50
University Musical Society
Burton Memorial Tower
8 CAMPUS SHOPPING DAYS
UNTIL VACATION
fJGifts that please and are remembered
are available at BALFOUR'S.
9U
OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RINGS
~RHINESTONE, and SIMULATED PEARL NECKLACES, U
0 EARRINGS, BRACELETS...
CIGARETTE LIGHTERS and CASES. y
COMPACTS,.. BILLFOLDS
0 GIFT WRAPPING. . . GREETING CARDS
O4 , CHRISTMAS DECORATION SCENES
A complete line of favorite gift items
in stock for immediate delivery.
M0
I BALFOUR'S
121 South University Avenue
"OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY"
/loe su 'hewn/
that
WTestinghouse LaundromdCAt
is
FAST * EFFICIENT * ECONOMICAL*

f

I

lNLY

3

A

SLWF

I

G

A

Pre-Holday Sale
Men's and Women's

SHO

11
I

5

':

Save up to $4.00 on Better Grade
FALL and WINTER SHOES

with Jean Parke
THURSDAY
F R IDAY

ar Gregory Peck
7:00 and 9.00

r

i ,

.r I

I

-~-U U III IiII

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