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December 06, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'PAGE I

'T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDA'YDECEMBM 6, 1951

0a
lPIchign

'age s

Defeat

Pitt,

78-69,

In

Opener

Wolverines
Wreck Pitt's

(..

..7

Hoosier Cagers Favored
To Cop Big Ten Crown

Landy Fails in New Attempt
To Break Four Minute Mile

Home.Debut
Special to The Daily
PITTSBURGH-The Wolverine
cage squad opened its 1953-54 sea-
son with a convincing 78-69 victory.
over Pittsburgh last night in the
Smoky City.
Harvey Williams, who tallied 21
points in the contest, sparked a
third quarter Michigan rally as
Bill Perigo's cagers broke open
what had been a fairly close en-
counter. Williams used his height
advantage to score six buckets
from in close as the Wolverines
opened up 59-44 third period lead.
PITT SPURTED in the final
period, but the closest it could
come was five points as the win-
ners coasted to victory.
In the early action the lead
see-sawed back and forth with
Michigan moving out to a three-
point lead at the end of the
initial period.
Don Eaddy entered the contest
in the next quarter and hit a
couple of jump shots to help the
Wolverine dribblers
With Williams, Paul Groffsky
and Milt. Mead dominating the
boards, the Panthers had to be
satisfied with just one shot at
the hoop time and time again. The
Pitt zone defense failed to stop.
the victors attack as the Michigan
cagers tallied on 35 percent of
their field goal attempts.

(First of a series reviewing the Big
Ten basketball teams. Today's story
is on Indiana.)
By WARREN WERTHEIMER
"First in the Big Ten and pos-
sibly tops in the nation" is the
way pre-season forecasters are
rating Indiana's hoop squad this
year.
And well do they deserve this
rating. Last season's NCAA champs
have lost but one man, reserve for-
ward Jim Schooley.
* * *
RETURNING are All-Americans
Don Schlundt and Bob Leonard,
Dick Farley, Chuck Kraak and
Burke Scott, last years starting
five for the Conference titleists.
Behind theni, Coach Branch
McCracken has five proven let-
termen, Jim DeaKyne, 6-3, Dick
White and Paul Poff, both 6-1,
6-11 center Lou Scott and Phil
Byers who is a foot shorter than
Scott.
The 6-10 Schlundt tossed in 459
points in 18 Big Ten games as he
set three new Conference scoring
records last season. An All-Amer-
ican o'n just about everybody's
pre-season dream team, the South
Bend junior is the "Mr. Inside" of
the Indiana five.
"MR. OUTSIDE" is the 6-3
Leonard, the "quarterback" of the
Hoosier attack. Leonard, a senior,
has a deadly outside shot, and is
an excellent ball handler and floor
man. He too is a favorite choice
for All-American honors this sea-
son.
Farley, called by many "the
Big Ten's most underrated
player," will be at one of the
forwards. The 6-4 senior, over-
shadowed by his more publicized
teammates, Schlundt and Leon-
ard, is according to McCracken
"the most versatile player on
the team."

..Kraak, a 6-5 rebounding ace,
and Scott six-feet even and a ball-
hawking floorman, figure to round
out the Indiana starting five.
* * *
DESPITE the fact that they led
the Hoosiers to the Conference
and NCAA crowns, these five men
are by no means secure in their
positions.
Wally Choice, a 6-4 forward
up from the freshman team, is
accorded a very good chance of
breaking into the starting line-
up. Jim Phipps is another soph
who looks very promising in
McCracken's book.
Height, speed, shooting ability,
depth and experience will make
Indiana very tough to handle. And
yet McCracken is still worried.
y "SIX of our 17 Conference vic-
tories were won by an average of
three points, one an overtime and
another a double-overtime. If
these had gone the other way, and
it wouldn't have taken much to
turn the scores around, then we
wouldn't have come close to tak-
ing the Big Ten title."
"In the NCAA playoffs, we
toppled DePaul by a field goal
and squeaked past Kansas in
the final by a single point."
"No sir," says the Hoosier coach
stubbornly, "you have to be lucky
as well as good, and we used up a
lot of luck last season." True or
not, few coaches are sympathizing
with McCracken's words of pes-
simism.
.* * *
Indiana opened its basketball
season last night with a home con-
test against Cincinnati. Tomorrow
night Kansas State, one of the
three teams to knock off Indi-
ana during the 1952-53 season,
moves in to play at Bloomington.
The Hoosiers first Big Ten en-
counter will be at Michigan Jan-
uary 2nd.

MELBOURNE-(A')- Australian
miler John Landy missed out in
his effort for a four-minute mile
yesterday, turning in a slow 4:09.5
but he ran smack into a hot dis-
pute involving a watch used in
timing the race.
Landy, who startled the track
world a year ago with a 4:02.1
clocking, slowed down yesterday
after the first quarter mile when
the time came over the loud speak-
er as 62 seconds. He realized he
then would have no chance for
Gunder Haag's 4:01.4 world record,
much less the coveted four-minute
mile.
* * *
THE UPROAR began after the
race, when it was discovered that
the correct time for the first quar-
ter was 59.5 seconds. Similarly, his
time at the half was announced

as 2:05 instead -of the correct
2:01.8.
Landy complained bitterly
about the incorrect time an-
nounced by officials, "if they
want to make is hard for me
why don't they put hurdles on
the track?"
Harried officials announced aft-
er a huddle that only one watch
was in error. Unfortunately, they
said, this was the watch used to
give the lap times and inform the
runners of their progress.
Landy, who .told newsmen, "I
immediately lost interest in my
Christmas dinner when I heard
the time announced," was still
keen to put up a strong race next
-Saturday and two weeks from
Saturday.

(

DON SCHLUNDT
... leads Hoosiers

a

--Daily-Don Campbell
PAT COONEY scores for Michigan in the third period of last
night's ,7-5 loss to McGill.
Indiana Cagers Win, 78-65
MSC Romps Over Creighton

MICHIGAN G
Groff :sky F 3
Jorgenson F 3
Codwell F 1
MeadF 2
Williams C 10
Pavchevich G 1
Barron G 5
Eaddy G 5
Totals 30
PITTSBURGH G
Bryant F 0
Resutek F 0
Novakevich F 2
Pavich F 0
Duessel C 5
Dietrich C 4
-Sari C 1
Burch G 1
.Artman G 3
Fenwick G 3
Totals 22
Michigan 23 17
Pittsburgh 20 13

F
4
3
4
1
1
1
1
3
18
F
2
1
2
0
4
0
0
6
1
1
25
18
11

PF TP
3 10
4 9
2 6
4 5
1 21
4 3
5 11
4 13
27 78
PF TP
3 2
0 1
2 6
o 0
3 14
4 8
2 2
1 8
3 7
3 7
20 69
20-78
25-69I

By The Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON, Ind.-Indiana#
University's defending national
champions got off to a slow start
last night before ripping Cincin-
nati wide open with a 33-point
fourth quarter to win, 78-65.
The decision was the 24th
straight opening game victory for
coach Branch McCracken's hurry-
in' Hoosiers, defending Big Ten
and NCAA champions.
AS USUAL, it was 6-10 center
Don Schlundt and set shot sharp-
shooter Bob Leonard at guard who
led the Hoosiers. Each had 20
points.
EAST LANSING - Michigan
State opened its basketball season
last night by setting a new MSC
single game scoring record with
an 88-51 runaway over Creighton
of Omaha..

The total was a new high for
Michigan State-breaking the
old mark set in an 82-49 victory
over Northwestern in 1952.
Michigan State dominated the
game all the way, leading 44-27
at the' half through 21 field goals
to only 6 for Creighton.
Forward Al Ferrari, who set a
new season record for MSC last
year with 351 points, was high
man for the Spartans with 26
points Saturday night.
THE HIGH scorer for Creighton
was guard Ed Cole, with 18 points.
NORMAN, Okla.-Illinois ran
away from Oklahoma last night
in their intersectional basketball
game 86-61 with John Kerr, 6-
foot-9 Illini center, setting a new
fieldhouse record of 34 points for
scoring honors.

Hoop Results
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Navy 86, Virginia 75
Michigan State 88, Creighton 51
Northwestern 69, Western Michigan 53
Rio Grande 88, Providence 87
Boston College 68, St. Anselm's 64
Fordham 77, Niagara 59
Indiana 78, Cincinnati 65
Michigan 78, Pitt 69
Detroit 77, Buffalo 58
Michigan Normal 71, Hillsdale 55
Wayne 67, West. Ontario 37
South Carolina 50, Georgia Tech 45
Stetson 74, Florida 55
Duke 101, Tennessee 61
Ohio Univ. 83, Marieta 72
Iowa 51, Washington St. Louis 45
North Carolina State 99, Davidson 41
Iowa State 76, Grinnell 62
Illinois 86, Oklahoma 61
Pennsylvania 78, Delaware 50
Penn State 66, W&J 41
Minnesota 75, Nebraska 64
Kentucky 86, Temple 59
Vanderbilt 86, Texas Tech 71
Ohio State 93, Butler 78
Purdue 71, Wabash 61
Wheaton 81, Great Lakes 78
Lawrencet86, North Central 73
Kansas State 70, Denver 41
Hanover 69, Ball State 68
DePauw 81, Evansville 62
Indiana State 63, Lincoln Mo. 49
Concordia Ind. 68. Rose Poly 60
Manchester 76, Detroit Tech .39
Taylor 68, Wilberforce 58
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
Toronto 3, Detroit 0
Montreal 4, Boston 2
Chicago 2, New York 1
NATIONAL BASKETBALL
ASSOCIATION
Rochester 72, Baltimore 65
Fort Wayne 92, New York 73
Boston 97, Milwaukee 79

:

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For the coming holiday:

,.'

6

Sports Proficiency Examined
By Startling University Survey

Bring your
Dry Cleaning and Laundry
to
ACE HAND LAUNDRY
& DRY CLEANING
1120 South University
or
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& DRY CLEANING
503 Liberty

"PO-WOW THIS WEEK:
Conference May Lift MSC Probation

CHICAGO-(P)-The Big Ten is
expected to lift the probation of
its Rose Bowl entry, Michigan
State, during the conference's an-
nual winter meeting in Chicago
this week.
Rams ,Humble
Colts, 45-2,
In NFL Clash
LOS ANGELES--()-The Los
Angeles Rams, with only a slim
mathematical chance for division
laurels, handed the Baltimore
Colts their worst beating of the
season, 45-2, yesterday.
These" were the same National
Football League teams that bat-
tled two weeks ago in Baltimore,
with the Rams winning in the
final period, 21-13, but it wasn't
evident yesterday as the Los An-
geles club advanced 50 yards on
their first play and thoroughly
dominated the game. Some 26,-
656 fans in the Coliseum and a
national television a u die n ce
watched in 79 degree weather.
ON'ONE SERIES of plays, Quar-
terback Norman Van Brocklin had
four consecutive pass completions
-to Tank Younger for 12 and 21,
to Elroy Hirsch for 11 and finally
to Dan Towler for 14 and a touch-
down. That made is 45-0 in the
third period.
Baltimore's depleted quarter-
back corps took a further beating
when George Taliaferro was forc-
ed from the gaie with injuries in
the second quarter. Jack Del
Bello and Ed Mioduszewski, mov-
ing in from halfback, shared du-
ties at quarterback.
* ~* *

Other important items on the
agenda are the mapping of a new
football television plat for presen-
tation to the *NCAA and a
thorough review of conference
legislation governing recruiting
and subsidizing.
IT IS believed that every effort
will be made to remove Michigan
State from the probation status
placed on the school last Febru-
ary.
The action was taken because
of the existence of a booster-
sponsored fund, allegedly used
for recruiting, called the Spar-
tan Foundation, Inc. Money in
the fund was not supervised by
the school.
Commissioner K. L. Tug Wilson
has repeatedly said this fall that
Michigan State has shown "satis-
factory progress" in discharging
the terms of probation. Wilson is
to report on the Spartans status,
to faculty representatives and he is
expected to recommend that the
probation be lifted.

RECOMMENDATIONS by the
Conference Television Committee,
possibly for live regional TV will
be made.
"Discussions of TV policy will
reflect unrest and dissatisfac-
tion with present NCAA tele-
vision policies," Assistant Coin-
missiorier Bill Reed said.
The review on legislation gov-
erning recruiting and subsidizing
will involve consideration of con-
trasting reports from two special
committees.
"ONE OF THE rules revision
committees reported to the con-
ference last May with a set of re-
commendations that were consid-
ered highly restrictive," said Reed.
"A second committee then was
appointed to make a contrasting
report and is expected to make
recommendations that would
broaden opportunities for finan-
cial aids to athletes."
The meetings will start Wednes-
day with a session of the football
coaches and the TV committee.
Athletic directors and facultymen
will open their sessions Thursday
and continue through Saturday.

You too can be an efficient duck
pin bowler, even at the ancient
age of 34, according to a recent
university survey on sports pro-
ficiency.
This and many other startling
facts were unearthed by this study.
For example, did you know that
you can be still a top corn-husker
at the age of 30, or a good ice
hockey player at 27?
A PRO BASEBALL player has
one of the longest spans of pro-
ficiency. Major league batting
champions reach top form any-
where from 26 to 29 years of age,
and the big league's hurlers are
at their best from 26-31.
All would-be bowlers may take
heart also, for the survey dis-
closed that an individual bowl-,
ing champion reaches his or her
peak at the age of 30, and stays
on top for four years.
If you are still stumbling around
a golf course to the tune of 120
or so, relax, for your time of great-
ness will come. The survey re-
vealed that both English and
Anferican Open champions all
reached their peak at the ages of
25-34.
IF YOU INTEND to make your
living stealing bases in the big
leagues, you are expected to reach
your peak at about 28 years of
age, but if billiards is your game,

then you will have to wait until
35 before you hit maximum pro-
ficiency.
A champion tennis player will
hit his peak at about 25, but
the tremendous wear and tear
of the game will hold you to
only two years of really top-
flight play. If pro-football is
your game, you better move fast,
for a player reaches his peak at
24, and begins falling immed-
iately.
Are you a wild, reckless auto-
mobile racer? (On the track, that
is.) If so, you will hit your peak
at about 28, and will stay on top
until you are 30. Rifle and pistol
shooters get most of their bulls-
eyes at 27, while a pro boxer hits
top form at 25 or 26.
So sport fans, gather up your
equipment, and head for the
arena, course, alley, court, or what
ever it may be, for you still have
a chance to become a good athlete.
At least that's what the survey
says.

2

MI

ti

I

DID YOU KNOW THAT.. . In
his 28 years of coaching Michigan
swimming teams Matt Mann has
annexed 15 Western Conference
titles, 13 National Championships,
possesses a dual meet record of
205 wins, as against 24 losses and
3 ties, and upon adding nine sec-
ond places to the other 13, ,has
been first or second nationally in
22 out of 28 years?

SPORTS
HANLEY GURWIN
Night Editor

FLY
ITE g
AIR
STOURIST
Low fares, frequent
schedules, fast flights on
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you make the most of your
vacation.
ALSO
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® .A

Michigan Christian Fellowship

Scoring summary:
Baltimore ... 0 0
Los Angeles .14 17

presents
THE RETURN OF

0
14

2-- 2
0-45

Baltimore scoring: Safety, Bu-
kich tackled by Agase and Don-
ovan in end zone. Rams scoring
touchdowns, Towler 3, Smith,
Younger, Fears. Field goal,
Fears. Conversions, Fears 3,
Hirsch 3.

Mr. C. Stacey iW
General Secretary, 1
Sunday, 4:00 P.M.,

CHRIST
oods
Ref reshments

dea~gned Iby aw.i '."Pu-t
LUST THE KIND OF CARDS
YOU'LL LOVE TO SEND TO
CASUAL FRIENDS ANk
} ACQUAINTANCES
Colorful and Smart
with Cheery Greetings
ASSORTED CARDS
tu'~OfA Box I

for the 1954 MICHIGANENSIAN.

Lane Hall

----

I-

E

m~ . 1 1,1 a11 m k1A1 t rM IA 11 1

t

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