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December 06, 1953 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-12-06

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 19$3

I I

Vote Survey Controversy Over Mental
Sees Party ospital Plans Revived

Line SIift
(Continued from Page 1)
lead us to believe." He pointed out
that no mention is more signifi-
cant than larger reference.
Part of a continuing study of
political behavior, the Center's
report is one of the most elabor-
ate analyses of the presidential
vote ever token. Designed not
as a prediction of the election's
outcome, the study was an in-
vestigation of the major factors
which influence the voting de-
cision. It is being carried out
under a two-year grant from the
Carnegie Corporation of New
York.
The study emphasized that
"Both groups (Republicans and
Democrats) are made up of a mix-
ture of all kinds of people. There
is no group which belongs exclus-
ively to one or the other party.
Each party may be said to repre-
sent the entire American public."
THE QUESTIONS ranged from
general to specific and references
in voluntary statements on issues
were coded by the Center.
Classified as "strong or weak
Republicans," "strong or weak
Democrats," and "Independ-
ents," the identifications are
based on the persons' own esti-
mate of how strongly they feel
attached to their party.
The study found that in the
South, registered Democrats out-
number Republicans more than
three to one. In the Midwest, 42
.per cent are Democrats and 33 per
cent Republicans while in the Far
West, 46 per cent are Democrats
and 29 per cent are Republicans
The Northeast is the only re-
gion where Republicans come close
to a 50-50 split, with 32 per cent
Republicans and 35 per cent
Democrats.
MORE Republicans than Demo-
crats have higher than average in-
tomes. More Republicans have
gone to college and are Protestant
and native-born.
Among the Democrats there are
more Catholics, more foreign-born,
more union members. Fewer
Democrats than Republicans own
their own .business and more of
them work in the ranks of skilled
and unskilled labor.
Democrats are less likely to vote
than Republicans, according to
this study and earlier research.
ENDING TODAY
The Most Fabulous
Daredevil of All Time!

(Continued from Page 1)

Northville," he explained, "and
it's twice as hard to get chil-
dren's therapists."
Dr. Rabinovitch strongly sec-
onded the state commission's as-
sertion of a great gap in mental
facilities.
IN ADDITION to the needed
emergency type hospital for short-
er term care which would be fill-
ed by the proposed University unit,
he said that there was also a ne-
cessity for service to very seriously
disturbed children, now partially
cared for by Ypsilanti State Hos-
pital, plus the Commission's "miss-
ing link," a proposed cottage plan
OSU active
Foils .Phi Sig
P'ledge Prank
"The best laid plans of mice
and men ..."
Robert Burns' famous line came
true Thursday night for several
Phi Sigma Delta pledges who were
attempting something new in fra-
ternity pledge pranks-a mutual
kidnaping.
THE FROLICSOME five from
the local chapter got their ideas
and laid tentative plans for the
event with Ohio State Phi Sig
pledges when they came here for
the football game two weeks, ago.
Under this plan, the two pledge
groups were each to capture an ac-
tive and transport him to a meet-
ing point, Findlay, Ohio. There,
the actives were to be exchanged
and taken by the pledges to the
other school.
Early Thursday evening, the lo-
cal pledges telephoned the Ohio
State Phi Sig house and asked to
speak to one of the pledges there.
However, an active with a fertile
imagination picked up the phone
in the "white mansion" in Colum-
bus.
Deciding that something "fishy"
was going on, he told the local
group that he was a pledge, where-
upon he was informed of the pro-
jected kidnapping.
So, while the local pledges kid-
napped Bob Isaacs, '54, and head-
ed towards Findlay, the Ohio Stat-
ers grabbed pledge Harvey Segal-
man, '57.
After trading prisoners, the Ohio
State actives released Isaacs, but
Segalman was brought here, where
a hurried telephone call to the
Ohio State Alpha Epsilon Phi

-
for less seriously disturbed pa-'
tients.
Dr. Waggoner agreed there is
a "definite need for more facil-
ities and bed capacity, just how
much we don't know." He cited a
long waiting list of children
needing help but said he
wouldn't venture to predict how
the new unit would alter this
situation.
"Where there is a complete lack
of facilities for children betweenI
15 and 19, we have to put these
adolescents in adult wards which
is rather disagreeable for both
adults and adolescents."
THE COMMISSION'S battle for
a 120-bed cottage type hospital at
Northville has been underway for
three years. At the last legislative
session in Lansing a solid bloc led
by Sen. Elmer A. Portwe of Bliss-
field, chairman of the Finance
Committee, held that priority
should go to a closed type institu-
tion for seriously disturbed young-
sters and it ought to be located
near a medical center.
Public pressure for the Commis-
sion plan was mobilized as the
Portwe-led bloc swung approval,
for a two million dollar hospital
at" the University and placed it
under the control of the Board of
Regents.
AROTC Rifle
Team Boast
21 Win Record

Civil Service
An examination fpr perman-
ent appointments to positions
as substitute clerk-carriers in
the Ann Arbor Post Office has
been announced by the Seventh
United States Civil Service Re-
gion.
b The position, open to Ann Ar-
bor residents and employees of
the local post office between
the age of 18 and 50, offers a
starting pay of $1.6112 per hour.
Further information may be
obtained at the Ann Arbor
Post Office.
DAIL
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN.
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1953
VOL. LXIV, No. 63
No0tices
Student Tea. President and Mrs.
Hatcher will be at home to students
from 4 to 6 o'clock Wednesday, Decem-
ber 9. All students invited.
Faculty of the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts. The December
meeting of the Faculty will be held
Mon., Dec. 7, 1953, at 4:10 p.m., in An-
gell Hall Auditorium A.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Blue Hufzman bicycle No.
18541-C, license 2657. 545 Mosher.
FOR SALE
1949 STUDEBAKER Champion, 4 door.
Heater, good rubber. Priced to sell.
Huron Motor Sales. Ph. NO 2-3163.
)1918
BRAND NEW Webcor phonograph and
tape recorder. Excellent buy. Call
NO 3-0521. Extension 627. )88B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store. 122 E. Washington. )14B
CORONNA PORTABLE-Call NO 2-7326.
)56B
1952 CHEVROLET Convertible. Radio
and heater, power glide; twin spot-
lights. 20,000 actual miles. Black and
red trim. A sharp car. $1345. Huron
Motor Sales. Ph. NO 2-3163. )190B
OUR CHRISTMAS TREE
Is available to you for making your
personalized photographic Christmas
cards. You may use your own camera
(or ours) and we will furnish the
lighting and helpful suggestions.
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 S. Uni-
versity. Phone NO 8-6972.
ve PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
)186B
RADIO-PHONOGRAPH table combina-
tion, 3-speed changer. $60. NO 32554.
1946 FORD Station Wagon. New tires,
radio and heater. This week only.
S $345.Huron Motor Sales. Phone NO
2-3163. )189B
TWO DOOR, 1949 Ford Custom Eight.
Clean, smooth running, already win-
terized. Priced for quick sale. Call
NO 8-6613 after 5:30. )185B

FOR SALE
NEW AUTO, deluxe, overdrive. Delivers
for $1952. Best offer over $1000. See
at 1236 Washtenaw. Then call NO
5-4205. )183B
DOUBLE COIL SPRINGS-$8.00; Steel
Folding Cot without, mattress, $8.00.
Hostess chair, good springs, needs up-
holstering, $1.00. Two large side-
boards, $10 each. Large walnut ve-
nleer table, and five chairs, $20.00.
Coal hot water heater, $5.00. Swervil
top chrome stool, $4.00. Phone NO
2-9020.
SIAMESE KITTENS-Two females and
one male. Phone NO 2-9020. )188B
1952 CHEVROLET 2 dr., power glide.
11,000 actual miles. Fully equipped.
Huron Motor Sales. Phone NO 2-3163.
)192B
i948 CHEV. 4 dr. One owner. Radio and
heater. Very clean. Huron Motor
Sales. Phone NO 2-3163. )193B
BABY PARAKEETS-Various colors, $8
each. New and used cages and bird
supplies. Mrs. Ruffins. 562 S. 7th.
)196B
BABY PARAKEETS and breeders, sing-
ing canaries, cages, supplies. 305 West
Hoover, Call NO 2-2403. )195B
TAILS-Van Boven full dress suit, size
38 long, like new, only $25. Phone NO
3-1511, Ext. 579; after five, call NO
2-3824. )198B

FOR SALE

BUSINESS SERVICES

NEW UNDERWOOD PORTABLE - $55. TYPEWRITERSI Portable and Standard
Call NO 8-7385. )198B for rent, sales and service.
1952 PACKARD - Standard four door. MORRILLS
Excellent condition. $1350. Call Ted 314 State St.. Phone NO 8-7177

Pattinson NO 2-2080.f After 8:30 p.m.
or Saturday or Sunday. )200B
ROOMS FOR RENT
WOMAN STUDENT wanted to share in-'
expen~sive apartment. Centrally locat-
ed. Call Lynn Snyder, eveningsand
weekends, NO 3-0334. . )20D
FOR RENT
FURNISHED campus apartment, 3
rooms and bath for 2-3 men. $100.
Phone NO 3-8454. )18C
HALF of well furnished 4~room apart-
ment, occupying entire floor. Near
campus. Includes bath, complete
kitchen, ample storage. Share with
one responsible grad student or pro-
fessional man. Beginning February.
$40.00 monthly, including phone, utili-
ties. NO 2-9185. )20C
PERSONAL
SHOPPING is as close as your phone
when you order magazine subscrip-
tions from Student periodical Agency,
NO 5-1843. )42F
HELP WANTED
STUDENT to wait table for meals.
Phone NO 2-6422. )46H
CARRIERS for The Michigan Daily.
Early morning hours. Excellent pay.
Openings)now and next semester. Cali
Circulation Dept., NO 23-24-1.
WANTED-Young lady for part time
work at soda fountain. Swift's Drug
Store. 340 S. State St. Phone NO
2-0534. )53H

HOME TYPING-All kinds by profes-
sional secretary. Fast, accurate ser-
vice. Reasonable rates. Campus lo-
cation. 820 E. University. Phone NO
8-7391. )171
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Past and Reasonable bervice
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1214 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
1%'3 blocks east of ]ast Eng. )51
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also Ironing separately. e'ree pick-
up and delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. )21
YOUNG MAN, M.A. 1 yr. PhD., English,
U. of M. Now working in engineering
research. Would like to work at home
editing, arts, science, literature, ad-
vertising, ghost-writing, secretarial
services. NO 2-8257. )231
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Phone NO 8-7590. 830
So. Main. 31
APPLICATIONPHOTOGRAPHS while
you wait at SNIDER STUDIOS, 213
So. Main St. 161
TYPING carefully done. No job too
small. Phone NO. 8-4075. 340 East
Williams St. 191
MISCELLANEOUS
THE FALL ISSUE OF GENERATION is
now on sale at the Union, League,
and local bookstores.

I - Im m

ENDING
TODAY!

ORPH EUM

1:30 P.M.
60c

The Special Committee Studying the
An impressive record of 21 wins Student Affairs Committee requests in-
and only two losses has been terested students or organizations wish-
postd s farthi yea bytheing to present briefs or memoranda
posted so far this year by the on the composition of the Student Af-
Army ROTC rifle team in postal fairs Committee to send them without
matches with other AROTC units. delay to Prof. Lionel H. Laing, 301
Included among the victories are Michigan Union.

Help Fig ht T B
utirvv~vti 4

A TIGHT LITTLE COMEDY HIGHBALLS
IN FROM ENGLAND!
"Sparkling with Rich Humor." ... Daily Mirror
ThCEitfield
I.M =!Thunderbolt
Coming Friday: "A QUEEN IS CROWN ED"-J. Arthur Rank

sorority house proved
a pledge.

him to be
qudd*

decisions over Purdue, Indiana and
Georgia Tech. The two losses were'
to UCLA and Montana State ear-
ly in the season. Against UCLA,
Michigan's unit fired a score of
1884 out of a possible 2000 points
for its top performance to date,;
but the west coast team posted1
1893.
* * *
THE RIFLE matches are con-
ducted by mail. After shooting and
recording its score at the ROTC'
rifle range here, the University
unit mails its score to the schools
with which it is competing. These
schools mail their scores to the
local unit.
Each team is composed of five
men who fire from four different
positions; namely prone, sitting,
kneeling, and standing. Since 10
shots are fired from each position,
the maximum possible score per
man is 400.
In its only Intra-school match
this year, the Army outshot the
Navy ROTC unit here, 918-914.
Firing only five shots from eachI
position for a maximum possible
total of 200 points, Casimir J. Go-
gulski, '55, of the Army ROTC led
his team with 193. The match was
held as a practice for later inter-
service and inter-collegiate rifle
contests.
Besides Gogulski, the Army team
is made up of Richard Schwing,
'56E, Ted Oliver '56E, Richard
Roemer '57E, and Paul Guy '56E.
Also on the shooting scene,
Rhody L. Nornberg, '56E, of the
Air Force ROTC last Wednesday
fired a 392 out of a possible 400
in a four position rifle match
against Penn State and Kent
State of Ohio. This score is the
highest recorded by an Air ForceI
cadet within the past two years.

Mortgage Loans. The University is in-
terested in making first mortgage loans1
as investments of its trust funds. The
Investment Office, 3015 Administration
Building, will be glad to consult with
anyone considering building or buy-
ing a home, or refinancing an exist-
ing mortgage or land contract. Ap-
pointments may bemade by calling Ex-
tension 2606.
(Continued on Page 4)I

I

Daily Classifieds
Reid and Use

boors Open
12:45
Shows at
1,3,5,7,9 P.M.EA

QUALITY
VERSATILITY
VALUE
Exclusive Selection Styled to Express Your Individuality
R'S3UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
. . . 316 SOUT H STAT E ST RE ET

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\\ MUCH TO
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$ F a
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Sunday Prices
Adults 70c

rECH.'NI COLOR

The Greatest Story of Love
and Faith Ever Brought
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