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November 12, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-12

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1953

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAGE THREE

PAGE THREE

SAMAft
7

1,Gom berg

Win 1-111 Foot ball Championships

I

B olden's Football Prowess
Big Asset for MSC Team

WOLVERINE SOPH LEADS SQUAD:

Versatility, Experience Mark Baldacci's Grid Success

By JACK HORWITZ
"That little man can do a to
of things" was the general com
ment after the Michigan State
Ohio State football game.
The little man was Leroy Bol
den, 163-pound junior halfbac
who personally knocked Ohi
State out of the running for th
Big Ten Championship. He score
three touchdowns on long run
during which he repeatedly shoo
off the heavy Buckeye tacklers.
BOLDEN, who came to promi
nence this year after being an un
derstudy to Don McAuliffe for tw
years, first appeared in a Gree
and White uniform against Michi
gan in 1951. He was allowed to pla
because of the relaxation of th
freshman rule. He scored a touch
down in the 25-0 swamping of th
Wolverines.
The following week he pro-
duced what his coach Biggie
Munn considered-up until this
year's Minnesota game-the very
best college performance he
could make.
Michigan State was fighting fo
national honors against a might
Ohio State team. Vic Janowicz wa
at his best. Munn was desperate t
plug the holes in the backfield be
cause established stars like Doi
McAuliffe and Al Dorow wer
gaining no progress. He inserter
his "pony backs" who were greer
and playing as a unit for the Ars
time. Led by Bolden, they turner
the tide. Their speed produced tw
last quarter touchdowns to turf
an apparent defeat into a 24-2
victory. Bolden didn't score him
self but set up both of the fina
touchdowns with his dazzling play
both catching passes and running
* * *
AFTER the game, Woody H~ayes

. the Buckeye coach, said, "Bolden
t was the big difference. Without
him, Michigan State never would
have won."
He played spectacularly all
k, through his freshman year al-
o though he did not start a game.
e The reason was McAuliffe. Last
d year the same situation prevail-
sd ed. He would only come in to re-
k place McAuliffe. The outcome
was that McAuliffe made All-
American and all little Leroy
Bolden did was to tie McAuliffe
- in scoring with nine touchdowns
o and 54 points. He averaged 7.8
0 yards on 53 carries to Big Mac's
- 5.4 on 98 tries. LeRoy, or Le-e-e-
y roy as he is so fondly called by
e his teammates, also snared sev-
- en passes and rambled 93 yards
- with two touchdowns included.
His play this season has added
more color to his college career.
He took over as regular left half
in the Spartan backfield and
sparked the Spartan's to decisive
victories, like the 21-7 downing of
Minnesota. Bolden racked up 145
r yards on just 12 tries and starred
y defensively. Scores of people con-
s gratulated him after the -game and
o all the little man could say was, "I
- did the best I could."
n * * .
e THE MOST amazing part of
d Bolden is that despite his slight
n physique-he stands 5-7%/ and
t weighs about 163 pounds-he is
d not a scatback type of runner. He
o possesses an excellent talent to
n change his pace and has great
o speed when this type of running
- is needed, but he also is powerful
l enough to belt his way through
7, the opponents lines for that extra
two or three yards. In spite of his
size, he is probably the best block-
, er on the Spartan team.

z
k
t
B
i
G

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
GOMBERG MEN CHEERING AFTER VICTORY-Team mem-
bers surround Coach Don Peterson after defeating Lloyd House.

Bq JIM DYGERTI
When Lou Baldacci kicked a 36-
yard fiield goal to give the }Vol-}
verines a short-lived lead over Il-
linois last Saturday, it marked the
first time in his long football ca-
reer that the sophomore quarter-
back ever atempted a three-point-
er.
The success of the attempt just
goes to show Baldacci's versatility
on the gridiron. Besides calling the
signals as Michigan's starting
quarterback, he effectively handles
the tough blocking assignments of I
his position.
IN ADDITION, the six-foot, 196-
pound lad throws an occasional
pass and often takes care of thej
punting duties. In the Wolverines'
first contest, against Washington,
Baldacci caught a pass from Ted
Kress for a touchdown. Against
Iowa, he converted two crucial ex-
tra points that meant the differ-
ence between victory and defeat.
Not only does he carry a big
load on offense, but his defensive
play has also been outstanding.
In the Washington game, he
sprinted over from his defensive
halfback slot to halt scatback
Bobby Dunn who was in the
clear and heading for a touch-
down down the sidelines. Bal-
dacci also sees considerable serv-
ice as a linebacker.
The most obvious explanation
for his pigskin versatility is the
fact that he has been playing foot-
ball since the fifth grade. Having
played four years in elementary
school and four years at St. Vin-
cent High School in Akron, Ohio,
Baldacci is now in his tenth year
of football.

one of two independent parochial
high schools in Akron, the hus-
ky youth played three offensive po-
sitions and filled three defensive
slots at various times. For St. Vin-
cent, he was a halfback and a full-
back, ja linebacker and a safety-
man. In the anual Ohio North-
South all-star game in which he
participated as a senior, he played
quarterback and defensive half.
Even outside of his school ex-
perience, Baldacci was continu-
ally in a football atmosphere.
His father, Paul Baldacci, is a
former coach of Akron Univer-
sity's gridiron team, and his
brother, likewise named Paul,
played football for Santa Clara
before that school dropped the
sport.
It was this experience and train-
ing that enabled Baldacci to edge
out competitors for the Maize and
Blue quarterback post and thus
become the first sophomore to
start at quarterback for the Wol-
verines since 1938 when Forest
Evashevski pulled the trick.
** *
FOOTBALL has not been his
sole field of endeavor, however. He
complemented his three high
school varsity grid letters with
four in baseball and three in bas-
ketball for a grand total of ten
varsity letters during his. high
school career.
Upon graduating from St. Vin-
cent, Baldacci had vaguely in-
tended to enroll at Notre Dame.
But, upon the advice of Mel
Kramer, his football coach in
grade school and a Wolverine
gridder under Harry Kipke, he
decided to attend Michigan and
has not resented his choice.
One member of the grid coach-
ing staff describes Baldacci as "a

natural athlete with great coordi-
nation and fine mental stability.
He does the right thing instinct-
ively."
Judging from his accomplish-I
ments so far this year. Baldacci
seems to be following the pattern

laid out by such great Michigan
quarterbacks such as Benny Fried-
man, Harry Newman, Forest Eva-
shevski, and Howard Yerges. Since
he has two more years of eligibil-
ity, the Wolverines should have no
quarterback problems for a while.

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Phi ds Edged
1-0, by Delta'

Victors Led

M Football Squad Continues
Preparations for MSC Tussle

Sigma Delta
By HARPER ATHERTON
Delta Sigma Delta won the Pro-
fessional Fraternity Touch Foot-
ball Championships last night un-
der the lights of Wines Field, by
defeating Phi Delta Phi, 1-0, in
overtime.
Bob Carey led the passing at- #
tack of the Phids as he connect-
ed with Tom Wilson, Granger
Cook, and Chuck Cory. At the;
half the Phids were at the Delta
Sigs' 20 yard line, but were un-
able to score, and the Delt Sigs,
took over on downs.
DAVE MILLS sparked the pass-
ing and running of the Delta Sigs,
but was forced to get off many
hurried passes as the hard-charg-
ing Phid line rushed him. The
Phids were in scoring position mid-
way in the second half when they
moved to the Delt Sig's 14, but the
Delt Sigs again took over on
downs.
The Delt Sigs scored their 1
point in the overtime as they
moved to the Phid's 11 on a pass
from Mills to Chuck Murray,
The Phids were unable to move
the ball back to mid-field.
Newman Club scored the only1
tally of its game with Standish-
Evans Club early in the first quar-
ter to win, 6-0, and remain the
Independent Touch Football
Champions.

f

The Wolverine grid squad brisk-
ed through another day of practice
yesterday in preparation for Sat-
urday's television battle with
Michigan State at East Lansing.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan put
his charges through the usual
blocking, tackling, and play run-
ning drills in an effort to sharpen
the team up for this annual con-
test with the Spartans.
* * *
THE HIGHLIGHT of the prac-
tice, which was played under grey
overcast skies with a slight driz-
zle, was the fine running and pass-
* t '

ing of Tom Hendricks, sophomore
halfback. With fleet righthalf
Tony Branoff on the sidelines with
an injured neck, a result of the
Illinois tussle, Hendricks occu-
pied his sp'ot in the starting back-
field.
The first string ran through
more plays scouted from the
Spartans, with the defense wear.
ing green shirts to get the grid-
ders used to the colors. Fullback
Dick Balzhiser, halfback Ted
Kress, quarterback Duncan Mc-
Donald, and Hendricks ran
from scrimmage with halfback
Dan Cline, halfback Bob Hurley,
and halfback Ed Hickey com-
ing in on certain plays.

ByMegyesi,
')
Wertheimner
By BILL STONE
Gomberg House emerged as the
residence hall football champions
last night as they blanked Lloyd
House 6-0 last night before a
small, but enthusiastic group at
Wines Field.
Bitter cold and high tension
provided the setting as Lou Meg-
yesif quarterbacked his Gomberg
teammates to the title. In the
first quarter Gomberg's Erle
Kaufman took the opening kick-
off and raced 30 yards to the 45
yard line.
AT THIS point the game quick-
ly settled into a duel between
Lloyd's Jack Watson and Megyesi
of Gomberg.
Late in the third quarter Bob
Woschitz intercepted a Watson
heave and charged to the Lloyd
35, to start the game's only scor-
ing drive. From this spot the
Gomberg machine began to click
as Megyesi hit Woschitz on the
20. Megyesi then sprinted to the
four, and Gomberg chalked up
a valuable first down. After one
pass had fallen in the Lloyd end
zone, Megeyesi faded to the ten
and fired the victory pass to
Jim McClurg.
By AL EISENBERG
Led by the excellent passing
combination of Warren Werthei-
mer to Paul Groffsky, Sigma Al-
pha Mu narrowly squeeked by Phi
Delta Theta, 7-6 thereby win-j
ning the social fraternity foot-
ball championship for 1953. .
The Sammies scored their TD
late in the first half. Three passesI
from Wertheimer to Groffsky net-
ted 68 yards and a first down on
the Phi Delt seven. On second
down Wertheimer tossed a pass
to Tauber for the 6-pointer. A bul-
let pass from Wertheimer to Groff-
sky gave the Sammies the all im-
portant and deciding extra point.
THE TIDE turned in the second
half as Phi Delta Theta complete-
ly dominated the game. With
Swaney passingbeautifully to
Lawrence and Andy Samosuk, theI
Phi Delts threatened three times
in the second half-but could only
score once. With four minutes left
to play in the game and the ball
on the Sammy 12, Swaney passed
to Samosuk for the TD.
The throng watching the game
hushed as the Phi's lined up for
the extra point. The ball was
snapped back to Swaney who fad-
ed back looking for an open re-
ceiver. Finding all his men closely
guarded he threw it in desperation
to Lawrence who was surrounded
by three Sammies. Lawrence leap-
ed high in the air but the ball was
batted down by Groffsky
'I

i "

WIATDIDHESAY P
Avery fastidious college senior decided to add a few col-
ored shirts to his wardrobe. S.o one afternoon, he strolled
down to the local shirt shop. "I'd like to see your smartest
colored shirts," he said to the clerk.
The clerk laid several Van Heusen Vanahue Broadcloths
on the counter. "These are our best sellers," he said. "They're
tailored of fine, high-count broadcloth that's very smooth
and luxurious. And you can take your pick of eight different
collar styles-including Van Heusen's new short collars that
are the rage of the college set,"
"They sure look good to me," said the senior.
"Good? They're terrific!" replied the clerk. "Just look at
that magic sewmanship-Van Heusen's finest. Why, even the
buttons are top quality, genuine ocean pearl. And Vanahue
Broadcloths come in every color of the rainbow-from soft,
subtle shades tomrich robust tones. What's more, they're only
3.95 apiece."
"Do you have henna color?", asked the young man.
"That's just what I got finished telling you," answered the
clerk. "You can have henna color you want!"

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