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November 08, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

rAGE ETGIT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1953

I I

EX-SECRETARY GENERAL:
Lie To Speak on Challenge of Times

By NAN SWINEHART
Trygve Lie, first secretary gen-
eral of the United Nations, will
speak on "How To Meet the Chal-
lenge of Our Times" at 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday in the third program
of the 1953 Lecture Course.
Known internationally for his
work in the UN, Lie has had back-
ground experience in national af-
fairs in administrative positions of
his own country, Norway.
* *
AT 16 YEARS of age Lie was
elected president of the Norwe-
gian Labor Party's branch in his
birthplace of Aker, a suburb of
Oslo. He held this post until he
graduated from the Oslo Univer-
sity Law School.
He served as assistant to the
secretary of the Labor Party and
later was appointed legal ad-
visor to the Norwegian Trade
Union Federation.
After serving as a member of
the Labor Party's National Coun-
cil, Lie was appointed Minister of
Justice in Norway. He served in
this capacity until war threatened
in 1939 when he was appointed
Minister, of Commerce, a key posi-
tion because of Norway's import-
ance as one of the world's leading
shipping nations.
Shortly before the invasion of
Norway, Lie directed the accumu-
lation and hiding of large supplies
of food. His foresight has been
credited with providing Norway
with three years supply of food,
enabling his countrymen to sur-
vive German occupation as well
as they did.
FOLLOWING a close escape
from the invading Nazis, Lie ac-
companied his government to Lon-
don where he was named Minister
of Foreign Affairs of the Norwe-
gian government in exile.
At the close of the war, Lie
Speech Group
To Present
'Queen Bess
Maxwell Anderson's "Elizabeth
the Queen," will be the speech de-
partment's second production of
the semester opening Thursday t
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Dealing with the life of one of
history's most famous people,
written by a noted playwright and
first presented by a distinguished
acting team, the speech depart-
ment production will combine a
cast of 23 and an array of elab-
orate costumes.
* s s
WRITTEN BY Pulitzer-Prize
winner Anderson, the play was
first performed in 1930 by the
Theatre Guild with Alfred Lunt
and Lynn Fontaine in the leading
roles. It was the first success of
Anderson's free-verse historical
dramas.
The play utilizes history, ro-
mance and pagentry to create
an effective drama, with a touch
of the Shakespearian style. The
plot centers around the famous
love affair between Elizabeth I
and the Earl of Essex.
In conjunction with "Elizabeth
the Queen," the speech department
will hold its annual High School
Theater Clinic. Over 600 students
and directors from Michigan high
schools are expected at the all-day
session Saturday.
The play opens Thursday and
will continue through Sunday. A
special student rate of 50 cents
will be in effect opening night.
The Lydia Mendelssohn box of-

flee will be open tomnorrow from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Panel To Discuss
Journalism Fields
"Jobs in Journalism," a panel
discussion on job opportunities for
women in all fields of journalism
will be held at 8 p.m. Tuesday,
in 1433 Mason Hall.

TRYGVE LIE LOOKS OVER PAPERS IN PREPARATION
FOR HIS LECTURE

continued as head of the foreign
affairs office. A short while la-
ter, he was chosen to head the
Norwegian delegation to the San
Francisco Conference where the
UN was to be formed. Here Lie
served as chairman of the com-
mittee drafting Charter provi-
sions pertaining to the Security
Council.
Lie was elected Secretary Gen-
eral of the UN when he was sent
to the opening session as official
Norwegian delegate in 1946.
During his term as head of theI
UN, Lie tried to strike a middle
course to hold the nations togeth-
er. He alternately incurred anger
from the West and from Russia

parliamentary maneuver, how-
ever, Lie was elected to serve
another three years.
Terminating his UN career by
resigning earlier this year, Lie is
now on a lecture tour throughout
the country. Following the tour
Lie plans to return to Norway to
work on a book describing his sev-
en years as first administrative
chief of the United Nations.
Tickets for Lie's talk may be
obtained at the Hill Auditorium.
Box Office Tuesday and Wednes-
day.
Varied Shows

Opera
Group order forms or the
1953 Union Opera "Up 'N'
Atom" have been distributed
to residence units on campus.
Block tickets will be distrib-
uted on a first-come, first-$
served basis to groups bringing
blanks to the Opera offices in
the Union by Tuesday,
Mail orders for individual
tickets will be taken beginning
Nov. 16.
VILLAGE:
Lack of Vets
Cuts Service
Willow Run Village is a place
where married students can live
for $37 a month if they are eligible
for the G.I. Bill.
Some 300 University students
and their families are still living
there, though five years ago there
were 1500 of them. Those were
the days of the great movement
of veterans out of uniform and
into white bucks.
** *
SINGLE STUDENTS, too, lived
in the Village's West Lodge then, ~
but they were moved out when
the University built additional
dorm facilities.
Most of the veterans left of
their own accord when they fin-
ished school, and the Korean
War vets haven't as yet made
an appearance en mass.
The decline in the Village stu-
dent population has resulted in a
curtailftient of student services
and activities.
University bus service has been
cut to three buses a day and a
branch library, intended to spare
students the evening trip back to
Ann Arbor to study, has cut its
hours from 60 to 20 a week.
* * *
SEVERAL activities have sur-
vived the decline, a nursery, the
Wives Club, ceramics workshop
and the Village Church. Recrea-
tional facilities are still provided
in the University Community
Center.
Apartments with from one to
three bedrooms, kitchen and a
bathroom can still be had from
$30 to $37 a month.
The Village's days are numbered.
Intended as temporary housing
for war workers and their fam-
ilies it has already survived far
longer than it was originally sup-
posed to.-
The Federal Government is ex-
pected to end the Village's pro-
loged career through sale or de-
molition.
Until something happens though,
students will continue to make the
daily trip to Ann Arbor. Seven
applications for next semester have
already been submitted to the
Public Housing Administration,

T alk1Un Lakes
To Be Given
Dr. C. H. Mortimer, noted Brit-
ish hydrologist, will talk on "The
Physical Environment of Lakes" at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow in the Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
A member of the British Fresh-
water Biological Association, Dr.
Mortimer is currently engaged in
research on the movement of water
in stratified lakes. His lecture is
sponsored by the Zoology depart-

Harvard University and has earn-
ed other degrees from Ashland
College, Ohio State and Faith
Theological Seminary.
Final meeting of the Religious
Symposium this Thursday will
feature an address by Douglas V.
Steere on the topic "Religion
Challenges the World."
Steere, whose work with the
American Friends Service Com-
mittee has taken him to -many
parts of the world on Quaker
Peace Missions, has recently re-
turned from Africa and will dis-
cuss the South African race prob-

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
ALMOST FINISHED-With work two weeks behind schedule,
the city's new parking structure on Maynard Street nears com-
pletion in time for dedication ceremonies planned for Nov. 17.
The $400,000 building has been planned to accomodate 350 addi-
tional cars in the South State Street business district.

ment.

lem.

Parking Structure

rd---

~I

Kantzer Slated To Address
Religious Symposium Session
Prof. Kenneth Kantzer. chair-: College in 1946. Prof. Kantzer
man of the Bible and philosophy taug fo two erf. te
department at Wheaton College taught for two years in the Bible
in Illinois, will speak on "Religion department of Gordon RockpotMass
Changes the Individual" at 8 p.m. k
tomorrow in Rackham Lecture AT ROCKPORT, Kantzer held
Hall. the pastorate of the Pigeon Cove
The address will be given at the Chapel there, and was also week-
fifth Religious Symposium spon- ,ly speaker at the Christian Medi-
sored by the Student 'Religious cal Society and Inter-Varsity in
Association and Campus Religious Boston.
Council. In 1945 he served as pastor of
Prior to his arrival at Wheaton the Community Congregational
Church in Boston.
rip 11 f1 T 1Kantzer received his Ph.D. from

L

r

I ;

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AND SEE OUR
"STORYLAN D
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f eaturing children's
books, games, educational
toys and gifts.
FO LLETT'S
Second Floor . . State St. at No. University

III

FAMILY DAY DINNERS
MONDAY THRU WEDNESDAY
Baked Virginia Ham and Fruit Sauce. ...... . 1.50
Fried 1'2 Disjointed Chicken, Southern Style. . .1.50
Grilled Cube Steaks and Mushroom Sauce ... . 1.50
Dinners include soup, relish tray, chefs salad,
potatoes, rolls, butter and beverage
Children's Order..........................90c
wober's suPero osb
Open daily 12 to 9:30 P.M.
3715 JACKSON ROAD

for being too soft or too hard on a ew
each side. V ie, ers

IN SPITE OF his former resolve
to keep Russia from walking out
of the UN, Lie was the first to call
on members of the UN to resist
Communist aggression in Korea.
Largely because of the way in
which he did his job during his
first term, Russia vetoed Lie's
renomination as UN head when
he came up for reelection. By a

Contest
A cash award of $500 has been
announced by the J. B. Matt-
hews Testimonial Dinner Com-
mittee for the best essay on
"Communism and Academic
Freedom," written by an un-
dergraduate in an American
college or university.
Essays may be no more than
two thousands words and can
be mailed to the Matthews
Award Editor, The American
Mercury, 11 East 36th Street,
New York 16, New York.

Shows ranging from hobbies and
local events to international ques-
tions await viewers on tomorrow
night's 229 Weekly of the Air,
University television show at 71
p.m. over WPAG-TV, Channel 20.
Two graduate students in the
political science department, Nor-
man Greene and Alexander Walk-
er, will view the British constitu-
tional issue in South Africa in a
discussion early in the show.
Other features will include a
talk on the work of the Friends of
the Library of Ann Arbor and an
interview with Prof. William Hal-
stead. of the speech department,
director of "Elizabeth the Queen."
Neel To Lecture
Dr. James V. Neel, associate
geneticist in the Institute of Hu-
man Biology and professor of in-
ternal medicine in the Medical
school, will speak on "Human
Genetics" 4 p. m. tomorrow at
the School of Public Health
assembly.

.F

II ,

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