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November 08, 1953 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SEVEN

f

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- ._ i

Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa
Smash to Big Ten Victories)

BRRR, IT'S COLD:

Fresh Air Camp Aided

f 'Y

Soph Backs
Star; Hawks
Trip Purdue
LAFAYETTE - W) - Sopho-
mores Roger Wiegmann and Ed:
Vincent of the Iowa Hawkeyes cut
up Purdue's defense with long runs
as Iowa smashed the Boilermakers
yesterday, 26-0, in a Big Ten foot-
ball game that had been expected
to be close.
Quarterback Lou Matykiewicz'
scored two Iowa touchdowns with-
in 53 seconds at the start of the'
final period as the Purdue team
fell apart.
* *
THE 205-POUND Wiegmann set
up Iowa's first touchdown with a
27-yard run through the line in
the second quarter. Lyle Leinbaugh
raced the last 10 yards to score.
Vincent flashed 55 yards down
the side line in the third quarter
to Purdue's 5 and George Dusty
Rice scored on the next play.
Purdu's defense fell apart after
that.
Matykiewicz then made his quick
pair of touchdowns in the final
quarter. Floundering Purdue pro-
vided the opportunities.
MATYKIEWICZ plunged two
yards after teammate George
Kress recovered a Purdue fumble.
He ran 25 yards for the second
after Rice intercepted a Purdue
pass.
Iowa completed only one pass
but didn't need an aerial attack.
It picked up 276 yards on the
ground to Purdue's 184.
James Freeman made good on
two conversions.
Iowa ..........0 '7 6 13-26
Purdue ........0 0 0 0- 0
Iowa scoring: Touchdowns,
Leinbaugh, Rice, Matykiewicz 2.
Conversions, Freeman 2.

Badgers Rout Northwestern Giel Romps
To Keep Title Hopes Alive'As Hoosiers

By

Jun ior

IFC, Panrhel

EVANSTON -03) - Sophomore
quarterback Jim Miller's two-
touchdown passing and halfback
Harland Carl's fleet running pro-
pelled relentless Wisconsin to
a 34-13 Big Ten football vic-
tory which spoiled Northwestern's
homecoming Saturday.
The triumph kept alive Wiscon-
sin's chance for at least a confer-
ence title share with a 3-1 record.
* * *
NORTHWESTERN, now beaten
in all four conference starts,
unehed itUI dfen- P.early to sto!

BIG TEN GRID STANDINGS
W L Pct.
Illinois..........4 0 1.000
Michigan State ..4 1 .800
Wisconsin ........3 1 .750
Ohio State .......3 2 .600
Minnesota .......3 2 .600
MICHIGAN ......2 2 .500
Iowa............2 3 .400
Purdue ..........1 3 .250
Northwestern ....0 4 .000
Indiana .........0 4 .000

to end Ron Locklin, who

got be-

cJ~tre Itsals e ery L p vi
fullback Alan (The Horse) Ameche hind Northwestern's secondary
as Miller quickly pitched the Bad- and scored easily.
gers to a 14-0 halftime lead. Making it 14-0 in the second
quarter, Miller arched a long pass
Wisconsin then scored twice to Carl, who grabbed the ball in
in the third quarter and once the clear on Northwestern's 28 andj
in the final period, rambled into the end zone on aI
After Northwestern made it play covering 52 yards.
14-6 in the third period on half- In the third quarter the Wild-
back Dick Ranicke's fourth-and- cats' Dick Ranicke recovered Jim
one for a touchdown dart, Carl Miller's fumble on Wisconsin's 21.

Sink, 28-20
MINNEAPOLIS - (A') - Minn-
esota swung a three-touchdown
haymaker in the first half, then
survived a sophomore-led Indiana
comeback in the fourth quarter to
down the gritty Hoosiers 28-20,
yesterday.
Spearheaded by another patent-
ed Paul Giel performance, Minne-
sota threatened a runaway after
mounting a 28-7 lead in the third
quarter, but Indiana sophomores
Tommy Cassidy, John Barkiewicz
and Dave Rogers touched off a
fighting resurgence in the final
quarter.
* * *
GIEL DROVE for two touch-
downs, his sixth and seventh in the
last three games and passed for
a third before the Hoosiers launch-
ed their counter drive.
Cassidy, filling in for injured
quarterback Florian Helinski,
delivered telling passing strikes
to set up the last-quarter In-
dianaLouchdowns, Bartkiewicz,
a fellow Chicagoan, and Rogers
slammed over. Bartkiewicz scor-
ed from the one and Rogers from
the two.
Giel, supported by line-smash-
ing of right half Bob MacNamara
and fullback Mel Holme, kept the
revitalized Minnesotans well in
control through three quarters be-
fore a homecoming crowd of 59,-
486.

OFF TO THE CAMP

followed a 46-yard scrimmage run
with a four-yard scoring dash to
sew up the game at 21-6.
STILL IN THE third quarter,
Wisconsin wasted little time after
a pass interception on Northwest-
ern's 22 to score a fourth touch-
down on halfback Jerky Witt's
seven-yard run.
Trailing 22-6, Northwestern
went 74 yards against relaxed
Badger defenses for its second
touchdown on halfback Lloyd
Israel's three-yard run.
Ameche went into action for the
final Wisconsin touchdown, bull-
ing four-yards to score.
* * *
WISCONSIN'S first touchdown
came on an 81-yard drive in eight
plays. Miller shot a 38-yard pass

Seven plays later Ranicke took a
clever pitchout from quarterback
Dick Thomas to score.
But with the third quarter run-
ning out, the Badgers scored twice
to sew up the game.

BALANCING ACT

Wisconsin .....7
Northwestern ..0

7
0

14
6

6-34
7-13

Wisconsin scoring: touchdowns,
Locklin, Carl 2, Witt, Ameche.
Conversions, W. Miller 4.
Northwestern scoring: touch-
downs, Ranicke, Israel. Con-
versions, Rondou.

a---- - -

DAILY
PHOTO
F EATURE
Story by
PAUL LADAS
Pictures by
LON QUI

Pled es Hit
By Freezing
Weather
Following the advice of Thoreaul
who advised mankind to "take to
the woods", pledges of 42 frater-
nities and 20 sororities lask week
abandoned the 'comforts of the
warm rooms in their houses and
went to Patterson Lake, 24 miles
northwest of Ann Arbor, to spruce
up the Fresh Air Camp.
At the camp, fighting tempera-
tures which hovered around the
freezing point, the 500 students
proceeded to give the 16 cabins
a new coat of paint.
SPONSORED by the Junior In-
terfraternity and Panhellenic
Councils, the project was\planned
and administered, by Bob Knut-
son, '56, Debbie Townsend, '56,
George Richardson, '56, Michael
Gale, '56, and Bob Busha, '56.
The pledges managed to sur-
vive the experience of roughing
it out in the country but not
without enduring a few hard-
ships. Many students suffered
chapped hands and faces from
the piercing cold of an earlier-
than-usual Ann Arbor winter.
But only on Thursday when the
thermometer fell to a chilly 24 de-
grees was the day's outing can-
celled. The work was made up by
sending out more pledges on Fri-
day and Saturday.
* * *
FOR MANY coeds the task of
balancing themselves on ladders
and wielding paint brushes caused
some difficulty as evidenced by the
many paint smears which soon ap-
peared on hands, coats and faces.
A comon lament was: "Why
did I ever wear my new jacket!"
The painting and cleaning up
of the camp is expected to aid
it in continuing its annual summer
service to underprivileged children.
Originally set up as a vacation
opportunity for underprivileged
boys from southeastern Michigan;
the Fresh Air Camp took on
sociological functions in 1946 when
i4 was placed in the University's
Institute for Human Adjustment.
The 31-year-old camp's aca-
demic and maintenance costs are
provided for by the University.
summer session. Remaining costs
are paid for by University stud-
ents' donation drives, by social
agencies which send the boys to
camp and by alumni contributions.
This is the second, year frater-
nities and sordrities have under-
taken the project, with last year's
mass painting job marking the
largest "Help Week" project in
local Greek history.

IRISH STILL UNBEATEN:
ND Pressed to Topple Penn;
Lattner Leads 28-20 Victory

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Quality cleaning at prices you can afford.
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e PRESSING WHILE YOU WAIT
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ON THE WAY, A DIVERSION

PHILADELPHIA - (AP) - All-
American Johnny Lattner, return-
ing one kickoff for 92 yards and
setting up two other scores with
spectacular runs, saved Notre
Dame's unbeaten record Saturday
as the nation's No. 1 college foot-
ball team downed surprisingly-
rugged Pennsylvania, 28-20.
The Irish halfback from Chi-
cago's West Side also intercepted'
a- pass in his end zone in the last
period when the Quakers were
threatening for a fourth touch-I
down.
S* * *
IT WAS THE toughest battle of
the year for the men of South
Bend and coach Frank Leahy, re-
turning to his duties after a two-
week siege of virus.
The partisan, sellout crowd of
74,711 was treated to a stirring
performance as Penn, a 19 point
underdog, fought the vaunted
Irish to almost even terms.
Ed Gramigna, Penn quarterback,
had his greatest day in passing
and fullback Joe Varaitis and half-
back Bob Felver ran like berserk
bulls through the Irish defense
that had cowed all other .foes.
LATTNER'S 92-yard touchdown
run with a kickoff came in the
first period after Penn had stung
the top-ranked Irish with a quick
opening touchdown. His great run
set off a touchdown reaction for
the South Benders who added two
more within the space of 10 min-
utes.
Quarterback Ralph Guglielmi
scored from three yards after a
68-yard drive and sub quarter-
back Don Schaefer added
another on a two-yard sneak
on the first play of the second
period.
This score followed a 35-yard
punt return by the elusive Lattner
and a 38-yard crunching march
by Notre Dame's modern version
of the Four Horsemen.
* * *
LATTNER also set up the Irish's
final score by twisting 56 yards
on a punt return early in the third
period. This carried the ball to
the Penn 26 and two plays later
Guglielmi threw a 23-yard scor-
ing pass to halfback Joe Heap.
The first Penn score followed a
62-yard drive, spearheaded by
Gramigna's passing and climaxed
when halfback Walt Hynoski went
over from the 5.
t

Penn took the second half kick-
off and moved 75 yards, mainly on
the ground with Felver contribut-
ing one run of 17 yards and Va-
raitis another of 15.

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