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November 06, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-11-06

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PAGE SrX

THE MICHIGAN D AILY

. IDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1953

Samnies Air
Attack. Stops
dSiTit s e Bid
With Warren Wertheimer toss-
ing four touchdown passes, Sigma
Alpha Mu swept to a 24-8 victory
over Sigma Chi yesterday, gaining
a berth in the IM fraternity cham-
pionship football game.
The Sammies battle Phi Delta
Theta, semi-final 'conquerer of
Delta Tau Delta, in the title game
next week.
SIGMA CHI, defending league
champions, jumped off to an ear-
ly 2-0 load, as an SAM pass from
center was dropped in its own end
zone. But the Sammies, coming
back, took to the air andmoved
down to the Sigma Chi five on a
40 yard heave from Wertheimer
to Paul Rchman.
The SAM attack then stalled,
as the Sigma Chis held for 3
downs, but on fourth down, pass
interference was called and SAM
had a first down on the Sig Chi
one. Wertheimer then lobbed a
touchdown pass to Larry Pearl-
man, the'extra point was missed,
and SAM moved in front to stay,
6-2.
Sigma Chi's kickoff opening the
second half was short, and Tommy
Kdvan returned it to the Sig Chi
15. On the very first play from
scrimmage of the second half,
Wertheimer faded back, and be-
hind perfect protection, hit Rich-
man in the end zone for a touch-
down. Again the extra point was
missed, but SAM had a 12-2 lead.
* * *
SIGMA CHI tried vainly to
come back, but the Sammies were
too strong. SAM gained posses-
sion of the ball again, and once
more Wertheimer went into ac-
tion, this time hitting Kovan for
a 30 yard touchdown. The extra
point try failed, and the Sammies
had an18-2 lead.
With only five minutes left,
Sigma Chi, under the leadership
of Norm Canty, finally began to
move 'downfield. Centy hit Bob
Littleson with a five yard touch-
down pass to cap the drive, nar-
rowing the Sammie margin to
.18-8.
The gathering gloom closed in
on Ferry Field, but the Sammies
were determined to get one more
score in before the end of the
game. So once more Wertheimer
went to work through the air
lanes, and pitched a 25 yard pay-
off to Kovan for the fourth SAM
tally. In almost complete darkness,
the extra point failed, but the
Sammies had the ball game and
a berth in the title match all
wrapped up, 24-8.
Next week's championship game
will offer a passing duel between
Phi Delt's Rusty Swaney and Wer-
theimer, and will be played under
the lights on Ann Arbor High's
Wines Field.
for BLENDED
HAIR STYLING
that pleases
try
715 N. University

9ef 0 is

Sigma

Chi,

PRE-GAME ROUNDUP:
24,- Conference Tea

ns Windup Drills

A Great Tradition Is Born
In Michigan's Darkest Hour

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By The Associated Press
EVANSTON, Ill. - Northwest-
ern will be near full strength for
its football game tomorrow against
Wisconsin.
Coach Bob Voigts said sopho-
more Bob McKeiver, halfback,
and Wayne Glassman, fullback,
are the only players expected to
be sidelined with injuries.
Northwestern's strong passing,
ombination of Dick Thomas to
end Joe Collier will be ready for
full service. Thomas was hurt in
the Ohio State game last Satur-

day and Collier has been hob-
bled by an ankle injury.
MINNEAPOLIS - Minnesota,
angling for its third Big Ten vic-
tory in five starts, polished off
heavy workouts for tomorrow's
homecoming game against Indi-
ana.
Oft-injured right half Bob Mc-
Namara, recovered from a twisted
ankle, appeared ready to start
against the Hoosiers.
* * * o
COL UMBUS - The Ohio State

football team, injured players in-
cluded, went through a thorough
polish session
Trainer Ernie Biggs said every-
one on the squad should be in
shape for the contest which goilld
eliminate either team from the Big
Ten title race.
* * *
IOWA CITY - The University
of Iowa Hawkeyes practiced be-
hind locked gates with all onlook-
ers barred for the second straight
day for tomorrow's game with
Purdue.

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IT'S A FACT
. . by Jack Horwitz
IT'S A FACT THAT Wally Weber, the genial big man with the poly-
syllabic vocabulary, who doubles as Michigan freshman football coach,
has appeared as a speaker in nearly 400 cities at more than 1,000 gath-
erings in the United States and Canada,
S* *, * *
IT'S A FACT THAT Wes Fesler, head coach of the Minnesota grid
squad, was once a player in organized baseball. After his graduation
from Ohio State University, at which he won three.letters in baseball,
he was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals and played in their organi-
zation.
* * * *
IT'S A FACT THAT Fritz Crisler, fabulous football coach of the past
two and one-half decades, became a coach because he needed a tem-
porary means of support. Crisler, who is now athletic director at Mich-
igan, accepted an offer from Amos Alonzo Stagg, then University of
Chicago coach, to take the job of assistant coach. He was going to
earn enough money to pursue his ambition to be a physician and sur-
geon. His temporary job flourished into many years of successful
coaching and the medical profession's loss was football's gain.
* * * * *
IT'S A FACT THAT in the first Rose Bowl game, played in 1901, Mich-
igan defeated Stanford, 49-0.,Coach Fielding H. Yost took only 15
players to the coast. Eleven men started the game and the same men
finished it. No substitutes were used.
r _

By IVAN N. KAYE
Daily Sports Editor
The story of Red Grange's great
day against Michigan has been
told and retold countless times to
the football followers of the Uni-!
versity of Illinois, but born in the
somber defeat of that afternoon
was also one of Michigan's proud-
est traditions.
"Fight like Steger!" - forgot-
ten today, those words rallied
Michigan's football teams of a
generation ago and form a little
known backdrop to the fabled ac-
count of Red Grange's day of days.
* * * -
IT WAS the fourth quarter of
that historic Illinois - Michigan
game of 1924. Grange had shocked,
the Wolverines with four long'
touchdown runs in the first ten
minutes. Michigan was hopelessly
beaten. The immortal Fielding
Yost, who had been forced to re-
tire due to illness, had stormed
down from grandstand seat to in-
still the old competitive fire in the
Michigan team, but even the Hur-
ry-Up man knew that the cause
was lost and the lay was Illinois'.
Michigan was trailing by 39-7
when an Illinois fumble was re-
covered at midfield. The Wol-
verines began to march. It was
Herbert Steger, the team's cap-
tain, who tore through the big
Illinois line for a first down.
Playing with reckless aban-
don.he carried the ball time and
again until it rested in the-
shadow of the Illini goal posts.
Here the Illinois defense stif-
fened to stop three straight plays.
They were playing their first game
in their brand new stadium, these
Illini, and they were determined
not to give the invaders another
touchdown. Steger carried on
fourth down and as he lunged for
that final precious inch of ground
a photographer chanced, upon the
picture of a lifetime.
*PT E o*e
THE PICTURE showed Steger

bareheaded, eyes blazing, teeth
clenched and fighting the grasp
of the three Illini whom he carried,
across the goal for Michigan's,
touchdown.
To look at the picture one
might conclude that it showed
the desperation of a man who
was scoring the winning or ty-
ing touchdown for his team. The
touchdown that Steger scored
only made the final score 39-14
instead of 39-7 in Illinois' fa-
vor, but to look at his face and
see that picture of spirit no one
would ever know it.
Jamels Cruisenberry, who cov-
ered the game for the Chicago
Tribune, saw something in the aft-
ernoon's activity which had elud-
ed most of the writers who had
traveled from far and near to wit-
ness the spectacle. He saw the un-
quenchable spirit of Michigan
when it was never more evident
ano never more needed. What he
told his audience was that he knew
at game's end that Michigan could
be outplayed, but never outfought.
Those who were there knew just
what he meant; those who weren't
could never understand.
IT WAS Cruisenberry, who upon
looking at the picture muttered,
"Fight like Steger." So the cry
went. The Michiganensian devot-
ed its lead page to a color drawing
of Steger fighting across the last
line with the three Illini trying in
vain to stop him. Yost used the
story of Steger's spirit to pull
many close games out of the fire
for his Michigan teams.
Tomorrow afternoon another
Michigan team takes to the field
of Memorial Stadium. No one in
the Wolverine lineup had even
been born when Herb Steger play-
ed his great part in Michigan's
football tradition, but the quali-
ties which the men of Fielding
Yost possessed to such a high de-
gree in 1924 are still present in the
Michigan men of 1953,

'I

Michigan Union presents another great
tonight
8:30 P.M. ANN ARBOR ALLEYCATS
UNION BALLROOM Pete Horst and his Bop Combo

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