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October 31, 1953 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-31

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SATVRDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

i

'U' DRUM MAJOR STEPS HIGH IN FAME:
Interest in Twirling Family Tradition
______ * * * *

By BECKY CONRAD
Holding 53 first-place medals, 13
r :trophies and the national baton-
twirling championship, the Uni-
versity's high stepping twirling
Drum Major Floyd Zarbock, '54A,
credits his 13 year old interest in
the baton to family tradition.
"My oldest sister once went to
a twirling exhibtion and came
home so enthusiastic about it that
she decided to learn the rudiments
of the art," he explained. "Her
marimba teacher just happened to
be able to twirl and so she began
lessons in the future family hob-
by. She still plays the marimba,
too," he said.
* * *
AND SINCE then, all the Zar-
bock children (three girls and two
boys) have copped nearly all the
awards available.
His youngest sister, Naomi,
now holds the national major-
ette champion title and spent
Christmas, 1952 on an exhibi-
tion tour of Europe for the USO.
However, the Wheaton, Ill.
twirler no longer participates in
many contests.
"I'm toying with the idea of
writing a book on the subject," he
said. Currently the twirling cham-
pion conducts "The Twirling
Workshop," a series of articles in
"The School Musician." "Maybe I
can organize these articles into
book form," he pointed out.
* * *
ZARBOCK emphasizes that ba-
ton-twirling is more of a science
than the layman thinks. Out on.
the field in front of a band, the
twirler may develop thousands of
combinations from the nine rudi-
ments. "It's really very simple to
learn," he explained, "Al you need
is a little inherent coordination
and lots of practice."
Zarbock himself is an accom-
plished artist in the fire twirl,
flag baton, gun and hoop spin
and use of two and three batons.
In his Wheaton high school, the
twirler spent two hours a day in
practice, since as with a music-
ian, if you don't practice every
day, you get stale."
According to his Phi Gamma
Delta fraternity brothers, he never
practices in the house, though. He
doesn't smoke or drink, and keeps
regular training hours.
THE STRUTTING twirler who
Gebhard To Speak
On Public Health
Dr. Bruno Gebhard, Director of
the Cleveland Health Museum, will
speak on the "Program and Ser-
vices of the Cleveland Health Mu-
seum" at 11 a.m. Monday in the
School of Public Health auditor-
ium.
Slides of the museum exhibits,
which teach better understand-
ing of health and medicine as re-
lated to the human body, will be
shown. All those interested are in-
vited to attend.

Tickets
'Non-student tickets for the
Pennsylvania -. Michigan game
will be on sale from 9 a.m. to
noon today at the main desk of
the Union.
Sold at face value, the tickets
will be distributed on a first
come, first-served basis.
Local VFW
Wi ll A voi"d
Bintgo Issue
Local Veteran of Foreign Wars
club will take a sideline on the
state VFW organization's drive
to legalize bingo, the club manager
here said yesterday.
Commenting that the local or-
ganization was "happy the way it
is" the manager said they will not
get involved in the drive but will
accept any changes as they come.
The manager also remarked that
the VFW here has never depended
on bingo or other gambling for
revenue, and that the anti-gamb-
ling rules have not affected them.
Forestry Group
To Hear Fontanna
Dean Stanley G. Fontanna of
the University School of Natural
Resources will address the Ameri-
can Forest Congress in Washing-
ton, today on "Desirable Patterns
of Forest Land Ownership."

By SHIRLEY KLEIN
Launching the year's activities
for foreign students, the Interna-
tional Students' Association and
the International Center have
completed several phases- of their
plans.
Newly elected to the ISA House
of Representatives are: Hagai
Pritzker, Grad. of Israel; Napoleon
Campomanes, Grad. and Lirira
Palafox, Grad., of the Philippines;
Schaila Niazi, Grad. and Suham
Ad-Dori, Spec., of Iraq; Turker
Karamizrah, '55E and Oscan Bas-
kan, Grad., of Turkey; Matsuo
Inamura of Japan; Patiphat Ara-
yasastra, Spec. BAd, of Thailand
and Richard Fu, '54E, of China.
* * *
ALSO RECENTLY elected are
John B. Ross, '54 LS&A, of Can-
ada; Eckehard Hammer, Spec.
LS&A, of Germany; Luis Escobar,
'54E, of Colombia; Harry Choi,
'54 E, of Korea; Jose Hernandez,
'55E, of Venezuela; James McMen-
amin of Great Britain; Perry Fal-
cao, Spec. LS&A, of Brazil; John
Latrides and Paul Kraemer of the
Netherlands. China and India
have not yet elected their repre-
sentatives.
Representing their regions of
the world, rather than nations,
are Harold Grisoni, '57E, Zlato
Rendulic, Grad. and George
Bergman of Europe; Husni Al-
ul, Grad., Rasheed Muriby and
Maung Than, Grad. BAd, of
Asia; Adeleke Adeyemo, Grad.,
of Africa; and Jose Teran and
Conrade Hinds of Latin Ameri-
ca.
Another ISA project is the pos-
Isibility of a three-man committee

to be composed of the Assistant!
Counselor of Foreign Students, an
executive ISA member and a fa-
culty member.
* * *
THIS COMMITTEE would deal
with the allocation of sums of
money above $25 for the Foreign
Student Emergency Fund. At pre-
sent the Assistant Counselor uses
his own discretion, although he is
supposed to confer with two other
members of the Center's staff.
An analytical report of the
Center's past ten years is to be
drafted by the Survey Commit-
tee, headed by Richard Kao.
Suggestions received for future
improvement will be sent to
President hatcher a n d the
Board of Regents.
Highlighting forthcoming social
activities for international stu-
dents will be the Monte Carlo Ball,
to be held Nov. 14 in the Union
Ballroom. Sponsored jointly by
the Center and by ISA, the an-
nual dance will feature Paul Mc-
Donough and his orchestra.
To acquaint foreign students
with Greek-letter life, ISA has
planned a series of guest dinners
in cooperation with Panhellenic
Association. and Interfraternity
Council.

Foreign Students Adjust To 'U'
Life Via Center, ISA Activities

'Heiress'
Tickets are still available for
today's closing performance of
the Speech Department's pro-
duction of "The Heiress."
The Lydia Mendelssohn box
office will be open from 10 a.m.
to 8 p.m. today. Tickets are
priced at $1.20, 90c and 60c.
Alumni Board
Of Directors
HoldsMeeting
The Board of Directors of the
Alumni Association met yesterday
in an all-day session.
Meetings began yesterday morn-
ing with the district directors, and
continued throughout the day.
Standing committees prepared
their reporots during the afternoon
and presented them at the dinner
meeting at the Union.
Church To Hold
Hungarian Service
A Hungarian language church
service will be conducted at 4:45
p.m. at the First Presbyterian
Church, 1432 Washtenaw.

AlumniWrite
For Mentor
Publications
Two alumni of the University
have contributed extensively to
the Fourth Mentor Selection of
"New World Writing", which was
recently released for publication.
Prof. Theodore Roethke, '36, of
the University of Washington
English department, is the editor
of a special section entitled "Five
American Poets" "and author of
two poems included.
Chester Kallman, another UnI-
versity graduate, wrote three of
the volume's poems. An accom-
plished librettist, Kallman colla-
borated with W. H. Auden to write
the book of Igor Stravinsky's opera,
"The Rake's Progress," and is
currently composing an original
libretto for the composer Carlos
Chavez.
Also included in the Fourth
Mentor Selection are verse by
other American and Irish poets,
critical essays, selections from
forthcoming novels, and a special
section of drawings. The book in-
cludes contributions from authors
all over the world.

--Daily-Dean Morton
FLOYD ZARBOC
. "no off-the-field strutter"

Ir i

stepped into Dick Smith's spats
this year as Drum Major is con-
sidered by his fellow Phi Gams
as "a very modest guy." "He never
struts in his off-the-field time,"
one of them pointed out.
A member of the band honorary,
Kappa Kappa Psi, and the Arnold
Air ,Society, Cadet Capt. Zarbock
was leader of the AFROTC band
last year.
Mainly interested in the educa-
tional. aspects of baton-twirling at
presents, Zarbock spent a pleasant
summer traveling though the
South to baton-training camps,
teaching young twirlers and judg-
ing contests.
Additions Slated
For Junior High
To relieve crowded conditions in
the local school system, the Ann
Arbor Board of Education has
awarded contracts totaling $733,-
909 for structural additions to
Slauson Junior High School.
Ashley Clague, a Board mem-
ber, described the additions as
"classrooms on the southwest
wing, a new cafeteria and music
rooms, on the northwest wing, and
a swimming pool on the northeast
side."
Kurtz Building Company , of
Ann Arbor received the general
contract, Dart & Cady of Mason.
the mechanical heating, plumbing
and ventilating contract, and the
Electric Service Company of Ann
Arbor the electrical work contract.

TV Schedules
Naval Film
Tomorrow
I "Victory at Sea," the naval story
of World. War II, will present an-
other in its weekly half hour se-
ries tomorrow at 6:30 p.m. over
ttelevision station WWJ-TV, chan-
Inel four, Detroit.
This week's episode, entitled
"Feeling in the Breach" is one in
a series of twenty-six half hour
programs which broadcast during
the f all and winter months depict-
ing the history of the U.S. Navy
from 1939 through the end of
World War II.
x The production of "Victory at
Sea" is composed of Navy war
sfilms and captured Japanese films.
Highly praised and rated by
writers and critics, the produc-
tion was awarded top honors
Jin the second annual Sylvania
tTelevision Awards for last year.
READ AND USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

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silver jewelry by MIRIAM PECK
is here. Come in and see it today.

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FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
10:45 A.M.: Dr. Parr will preach on, "This Dis-
turbing Religion."
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild will meet in the May-
flower Room. Panel discussion, "Gods of the
Campus."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Student Seminar. Topic: "God: He
Made Us But Not Our Mess."
10:45 A.M.: Worship "A Faith For God's Free
Sons" Dr. Abbey preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program, International
Night. Three students, a German, a Chinese,
and an American will discuss "America's Role
in the World Today."~
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: "A False Step."
7:30 P.M.: "Waiting for His Son From Heaven."
Wednesday, 8:00: Prayer Meeting.
A Friendly Church Where The Word Is Preached
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christion Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenow at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. 25-025. Office Ph. 7421
10:00 A.M.: Morning Service.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. "The Certainty of
Soalvation."
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild. Fellowship night
party.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:00 A.M.: Matins Service.
10:00 A.M.: Bible Studv.
11:00 A.M.: Worship Service.
7:00 P.M.: Meeting - Speaker, Dr. William
Alston of the Philosophy Dept., "Scientific
Method & Christian Faith."

ATTENTION ALL

Our NEW,
MODERN,
Student Supply
Department

ALUMNI

THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone 20085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Church School and Adult
Group.
11:00 A.M.: Unitarian Junior High.
11:30 A.M.: Services of Worship: "400 Years
Since Servetus."
12:15 A.M.: Fellowship Dinner.
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Students Panel Discussion
"Seeking a Liberal Ideology."
Transportation from Lane Hall at 7:15 P.M.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y.M.C.A. Auditorium
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Thursdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study.
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth"
WXYZ-ABC Network
Sundays: 1:00-1:30 P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone 7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor and Student Coun-
selor
9:45 A.M.: Student Class continues its discussion
series with "What Students Can Believe About
Jesus.''
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship. "The World's
Greatest Christian"-Rev. Loucks.
6:45 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Miss Doris
Reed, protestant counselor for foreign students,
speaks on "World-wide Friendships."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 AM.: Sunday School.
11:00 AM.: Sunday Morning Services.
Nov. 1-Everlasting Punishment.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:30 A.M.,
9:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M.,
11:00 A.M, 12.00 Noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Father Richard Center.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday, 11:30 to 1:00: Buffet Luncheon for
Alumni.
Saturday at 4:30: Open House after the Game.
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Two Worship Op-
portunities, with the pastor preaching on "The
Reformation's Specially Brilliant Light."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Speaker, Miss Elea-
nor Weidner, on "The Work of a Lutheran
Deaconess."
Friday, Nov. 6, at 8:00: Concert by "Wings Over
Jordan" Choral Group.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Borger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "The
Burning Book."
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Meeting at the Congregational Church, 7:00 P.M.
Student Panel "Gods of the Campus."

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ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Dr. Robert H. Whitaker, Chaplain for
Student Foundation
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis, Social Director
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Commentary.
9:50 AM.: Student Breakfast, Canterbury
House.
10:00-10:45: Junior High and High School
Classes.
11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon.
12:30: After-Service Fellowship, Recreation Room.
4 :30 P.M.: Student Confirmation Class, Canter-
bury House.
6:00 P.M.: Student Supper Club, Canterbury
House;.p

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