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October 31, 1953 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1953-10-31

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PAGE T HEE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Unbeaten Illini Clashes with Boilermaker

Today

I

Big Ten Football Conference
Best Over Non-League Foes
Western Conference Displays .714 Mark;
Southeastern, Southwest Conferences Trail

By DAVE BAAD
Despite Purdue's three succes-
sive early season intersectional de-
feats, Big Ten football teams have
compiled the best record against
non-league foes of any of the
country's major pigskin confer-
ences.
Only Southern California and
UCLA, the two titans of the Pacific
Coast, have scored victories over
any of the other Big Ten squads.
COUNTERBALANCING its six
defeats, the Western Conference
has picked up 15 games on the
positive side of the ledger for a
composite percentage of .714. This
is .022 points better than the
Southeastern Conference which
stands second in intersectional
competition.
The Southwest Conference is
third with a .667 mark, followed
by the Atlantic, .611, Pacific
Coast Conference, .553, and the
Big Seven, .347.
Purdue, which opened the sea-
son by dropping consecutive tus-
sles to Missouri, Notre Dame and
Duke, has dropped exactly half of
the Big Ten's group of defeats.
Southern California garnered two
Western Conference scalps in its
first two games of the season
whipping Minnesota and Indiana.
ONCE BEATEN UCLA was re-
sponsible for the remaining loss
when it ground out a gruelling 12-
0 decision three weeks ago against
Wisconsin.
Northwestern, presently hold-
ing the league cellar position,
holds three straight victories
over non-Big Ten opposition.
The Wildcats clipped Iowa State
and Army to start the campaign
and then nipped Pittsburgh last
Saturday 27-21.
Ohio State, Iowa, Michigan and
Illonois have all wrapped up two
wins without setback.
* * *
IN ACTION against its Rose
Bowl associate, the Pacific Coast
Conference, Big Ten schools have
recorded four wins and three loss-
es. Stanford, Washington State,

Washington, and California were
beaten by Illinois, Iowa, Michigan
and Ohio State respectively.
Michigan State plays Oregon
State tomorrow in a game
that according to prognostica-
tors, should put the Big Ten up
one more game on the Coast
league.
Helped considerably by games
against the likes of Stetson, Chat-
tanooga, North Texas State, Mem-
phis State and The Citadel, the
Southeastern Conference has pil-
'ed up 18 non-league wins against
eight defeats.
AGAINST THE so-called major
college elevens, its record is
slightly less impressive, 11 victories
and seven losses. The subtraction
of a loss occurs because Alabama
was beaten by one of the minor,
clubs, Mississippi Southern, 25-19.
Only Mississippi State and LSU
are undefeated in out-league
play, each having won two
games. State beat Memphis State
and North Texas State, while
the Tigers smeared Boston Col-
lege, 42-6 and nipped Texas,
20-7.
Georgia Tech, top team in the
sprawling Southeastern Confer-
ence, suffered its first intersec-
tional defeat since mid-season,
1949, last week, when it dropped a
27-14 contest to top ranked Notre
Dame. Its last non-conference
loss was one of identical margin to
Duke.
'* * *
The only game between the
Southeastern and Western Con-
ferences was the Wolverines' 26-7
triumph over Tulane.
Rice and Texas A & M racked up
three victories apiece early this
season to be mainly desponsible for
the Southwest =Conference's posi-
tion as the third best intersection-
al-wise.
HIGH SCHOOL SCORES
Benton Harbor 20, Muskegon Heights 7
Kalamazoo Central 7, Lansing Eastern 6
Dexter 46, Manchester 6
Battle Creek 41, Holland 20
Lakeview 26, Coldwater 7

DUNCAN McDONALD
. . . star passer

OSU Faces
NU; Badgers
Meet Iowa
By The Associated Press
CHICAGO - Unbeaten Illinois,
the team overlooked in pre-season
reckoning, tries for its third Big
Teri football victory today against
Purdue.
Lone undefeated conference con-
tender, the Illini play host to the.
team which last Saturday smashed
Michigan State's victory streak at,
28 games.
ONLY TWO OTHER league con-
tests are scheduled. Four teams
encounter non-conference rivals.
Ohio State faces , invading
Northwestern, and Iowa. plays
at Wisconsin. The non-loop
skirmishing includes Missouri at
Indiana, Penn at Michigan, Ore-
gon State at Michigan State and
Pittsburgh at Minnesota.
Illinois, after an opening tie with
Nebraska, swept past Stanford,
Ohio State, Minnesota and Syra-
cuse.
OHIO STATE rates a seven-
point favorite over Northwestern.
The Wildcats, however, have con-
siderable ground power to back up
the passing of quarterback Dick
'Thomas.
Wisconsin is a seven - point'
choiceyover Iowanalthough the
*Hawkeyes will confront Badger
fullback Alan (The Horse) Ameche
with one of the nation's best de-'
fenses against rushing.
All four Big Ten teams are fa-j
vored in the non-conference com-,

LOU BALDACCI
. .. signal-caller

GM Prefers'
Individual
Telecastinig
By the Associated Press
DETROIT-General Motors an-
nounced last night it was drop-
ping a scheduled Nov. 7 "pan-
orama" football telecast in favor
of televising three separate region-
al games and one local contest.
GM_ spokesmen said that the
NCAA television committee had
approved the new scheme to re-
place the ill-received "panorama"
type telecast in which viewers saw
snatches of several games.
INSTEAD, GM's "game of the

week" will present four separate petition.
games over NBC stations, with
each of three regionstandsone lo- EAST LANSING-Kip Taylor, a
cality receiving different, complete former Michigan State assistant'
games. coach, was back in town yester-
The Florida-Georgia game will day, gunning for his old boss.
be seen over NBC-TV stations in Taylor arrived after- a trans-
10 eastern and southeastern continental train trip with a 35-
states and Washington, D. C. man squad from Oregon State.
The Kansas-Kansas State game
at Lawrence, Kans., will be seen MICHIGAN STATE and Oregon
over stations in 11 western states. State meet Saturday before a sell-
* * * out football audience in Macklin
THE Northwestern - Wisconsin Stadium.
game at Evanston, Ill., will be Taylor's Beavers lost their first
seen over all other stations of the five games and didn't make a
NBC-TV network with one ex- touchdown, but last week Oregon
ception. State upset Idaho 19-0.

FIELD DAY FOR NIEBOER:
Standish-Evans Wallops Hawaiians, 32-0

'M' Ifooters
'Play Turkis
Ont Sund"ay
The Michigan soccer squad
takes on the experenced Interna-
tional Turkish team Sunday at
2:30 on the soccer field east of
the Stadium.
The International Turkish team
has a 2-0 record for the current
season, beating the Chinese and
Arab squads.
* * * -
THE MICHIGAN soccer team's
only victory came last week in a
home game, 5-2. The Michigan
team was defeated by Ohio State
University, 3-1 and shut out, 4-0,
by the Indiana soccer squad. In
a return match with the Hoosiers,
the game ended in a 4-4 tie.
Four players on the starting
team have just one game of ex-
perience going into Sunday's
tilt with the Turkish club. Left
outside Jim Pisunyer, center for-
ward Tom Tuttle, halfbacks
Otto Vogel, and Larry Gutman
played their initial contest last
week against Ohio Wesleyan,
but they are not newcomers to
the game of soccer.
Vogel played most of his soc-
cer in Germany before coming to
the United States. Inside right
Kuo Chiew Quan and halfback
Ben Bonnlander, both experienced
players, will bolster the Michigan
team when it attempts to upend
an undefeated Turkish squad.
THE MICHIGAN soccer team is
managed by senior Ken Ross. Alan
Cassles, who came here from Ox-
ford University in England, cap-
tains the team and briefs them
between quarters on their mistakes
and the weaknesses of the oppos-
ing team.
The soccer team plays two
games away next weekend. Ohio
Wesleyan entertains the Michigan
team Saturday, November 7.The
team travels 26 miles to Bambier,
Ohio, where they take on the
Kenyon soccer eleven the following
Sunday.

By CORKY SMITH
Standish-Evans smothered the
Hawaiians, 32-0, as Maynard Nie-
boer figured in four touchdowns
and two points, and led his team
to victory in one of the Indepen-
dent League tilts yesterday after-
noon at Ferry Field.
Tony Drabik tossed a pass to
Jim Holmes for the first Standish-
Evans score. The attempt for the
extra point failed. Nieboer threw
another pass to Drabik for the
second six-pointer. This time the
extra point try was successfu.
A FIVE-YARD run set up the
winners' third tally. On the next
play Nieboer skirted his right end
for another six points. His at-
tempted pass for the extra point
was knocked down.
Nieboer ran around his left
end for 15 yards and paydirt in
scoring the fourth touchdown.
The final marker came when
Nieboer pulled in an Hawaiian
Club aerial in his own end zone
and galloped up the sidelines for
Sportsquick
By the Associated Press
ROANOKE, VA.-Virginia Tech's
Gobbler's, combining air and
ground power, easily outclassed
The Citadel's Bulldogs last night,
22-0, in a Southern Conference
football game witnessed by a slim
crowd of 3,000. Halfback Billy An-
derson, Tech's fastest back, scored
two touchdowns.
-* * *
BOSTON-Bob Girman, a hard-
driving fullback replacement, rac-
ed 41 yards for a touchdown and,
given a second try because of a
penalty, Don Molenda, converted
the point that gave Marquette a
7-6 victory over a hard fighting
but luckless Boston University
football team last night on soggy
Braves Field.
Other scores:
Chattanooga 44, Louisville 6
Sam Houston State 26, Tampa 6
VPI 22, The Citadel 0
Youngstown 21, John Carroll 7
Marquette 7, Boston U. 6
Olivet 26, Kalamazoo 19

MICHIGAN
SEAL
POPLIN JACKETS
$5 95
SWEAT SHIRTS
I $5- $25 _$350
I-Shirs.'.. $1.25
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1107 S. University Ave. - Opposite AA Bank on S. U.

another Standish-Evans score.
His run around end finished the
scoring for the afternoon, and
of the 32 points he personally
accounted for 20 of them.
The Newman Club ran over the
Michigan Co-op, 31-12, in another
independent contest at Ferry
Feld yesterday afternoon. Pat
Donahue tossed five touchdown
passes to feature the scoring for
Newman Club. He tossed the first
TD pass pass to Pat Riley. The
extra point attempt was good.
Arvin Earleson snared a Dona-

hue aerial for the second marker.
Donahue found Jim Schweitzer in
the open and hit him with another
touchdown pass to account for
the Newman Club third tally, as it
continued on its TD parade. Tony
Steinmle paced the winning re-
ceivers with two touchdown passes.
Tony's second catch was a 25-
yard aerial from the successful
arm of Donahue. The extra point
try was unsuccessful.
The games between LSA and
MCF, and Nakamura and Forestry
Club were not played.

Store Hours: 9:00-6:00 - Mondays 9:00-9:00. Phone 3-4046 1

I

INTERSECTIONAL CLASH OF 1908:
Spirited Michigan Team Lost to Stronger Quakers

Jor

~Jcomecomton/

Veel e cd.

MICHIGAN SOUVENIRS

By IVAN N. KAYE
Daily Sports Editor
,yThis Is homecoming for thous-
ands of Michigan alumni, and in
a way it is appropriate that the
opponent this afternoon is the
University of Pennsylvania.
In the vast audience at the
Stadium there will doubtless be a
few who remember another Michi-
gan-Pennsylvania game that was
played here in Ann Arbor nearly
a half-century ago.
IT WAS IN 1908 that Penn,
boasting one of the finest teams
in its long and successful foot-
ball history, invaded Ferry Field
to play a Michigan squad that was
no match for it.
All week preceeding the game,
sportswriters told Fielding Yost
that his team would be slaugh-
tered, and that Michigan might
do well not to show up for the
gi me. After all, they reasoned,
a 'orfeit meant only a 1-0 score
in "ennsylvania's favor.
Th 'se who suggested that Michi-
gan r ifrain from playing the game
did n, 't know Fielding Yost very
well. the Hurry-Up man was as
confide it as ever. His famous
cigar Nas carried at the same
jaunty - ngle as when his great
Point-a-A 'inute teams had run
roughshoc over the college foot-
ball world three years earlier.
* * *
YOST HAD a few reasons for
confidence. After all, hadn't he the
all-time All-American Germany
Schultz to back up his line? And
didn't he have the great punter
Dave Allerdice to keep the op-
ponents away from the Michigan
goal? True enough, these were
magnificent football players, but
Pennsylvania had one of those
"once in a generation" teams that
the folks in Philadelphia would
talk about for years. Although the
handwriting was clearly on the
wall, Yost allowed no one in the
Michigan camp to admit for one
instant that there was any pos-
sibility of defeat.
Just before the start of the
game Yost gave his players a
fiery pep-talk. So impressive was
his oration that a reserve full-
back namet J. Fred Lawton nev-
er forgot the words spoken by

ed upon each member of the team
to give his last ounce of strength
for Michigan, had a profound ef-
fect on the players. They went
out and played mighty Pennsyl-
vania to a complete standstill in
the first half. A fumble gave the
Quakers a touchdown and a 6-0
lead, but the Ferry Field crowd
gaped in amazement at the ac-
complishment of Yost's team.
O N L Y KEENE Fitzpatrick,
Michigan's trainer, knew what the
magnificent first half effort had
cost the Wolverines. Captain
Schultz, a fanatic who had made
nearly half of the tackles in the
game, was almost incapacitated
with a severly injured hip. Aller-
dice, whose magic toe had kept
the burly Quakers at bay, had a
broken collar bone. The rest of
the Michigan players were wear-
ied by their superhuman effort.

Fitzpatrick, and even the
domitable Yost, knew that
team had played its game in
first half.

in-
the
the

Pennsylvania rolled to 23
points in the final 30 minutes
for a 29-0 victory, the worst
ever inflicted on a Yost coach-
ed team. Schultz managed a few
plays in the third quarter be-
fore being helped from the field.
With him went Michigan's only
hope of holding the Quakers.
Allerdice continued and play-
ed the entire half with his brok-
en collar bone, lending words of
encouragement to his failing
team mates.

ging respect of every member of
the Eastern squad.
Michigan's great athletic tradi-
tion is built primarily upon vic-
tory, but we like to look back at
that 1908 Pennsylvania game as an
example of the great spirit behind
sports at the University. In de-
feat, as in victory, the men of
Yost, as would the men of Kipke
and Crisler and Oosterbaan of a
later day, carried themselves with
the dignity of champions.

M usical Footballs ........ . . . . . . . . ........ . . . 3.25
Michigan Seal Glasses4....... ...........40c and up
Stuffed Animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..2.25 and up
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M ichigan Garters.. ......................... 1 .25
PERFECT GIFTS FOR YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS
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HILLEL CHORUS

i

Although it may sound impos-
sible in terms of mid-century
standards, Michigan was acclaim-
ed even in defeat. It was Penn's
toughest game all year, and Yost's
fighting team earned the grud-

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