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October 20, 1953 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-20

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Y, OCTOBER 20, 1953

'U' ELEMENTARY SCHOOL:-

21 at 7 p.m. in 2084 East Engineeringk
Building.

Youngsters 'Head for the Wilderness'

By ELLEN BROWN
The 8:01 express to Battle Creek
carried a young cargo early yes-
terday.
The train was jammed with Uni-
versity Elementary School fifth
and sixth graders headed towards
a week of school in the wilderness.
* * *
DESTINATION AT Clear Lake
Camp near Battle Creek, the
youngsters will find the emphasis
of their lessons on social living.
To' be with their classmates
all day and all night, too, is
something new for youngsters.
School is held in the woods and
sleeping is done in cabins. The
experience might turn into a
regular practice for the upper
elementary grades.
Studies will be carried on much
as they are in University Elemen-
tary classrooms, but the girls will
wear jeans, and there will be boat-
ing on the lake, archery and dif-
ferent crafts for their spare time.
Also planned for the week are
hikes and cook-outs to a grist mill,
a gravel pit and an old .lumber
mill.
Each child will be taking pic-
tures of what they do with their
own cameras. They will be study-
ing the photography industry first
hand from Daniel I. Moore, the
sixth grade teacher, and John
Fisher, who teaches fifth grade.
And since there's a dark room at
the camp, all the children can
learn about developing film-strips.
* * *
WHEN IT GETS dark, activities
won't cease. Counselors will 'call
square dances and will teach the
youngsters social dancing, too.
The University elementary
youngsters get all this for $16.45
apiece, and with the coopera-
tion of teachers, parents and the
Battle Creek Board of Educa-
tion, Clear Lake Camp owner.
Of course there will be a bit of
work for the children. Camp em-
ployees will dish up -the meals, but
the fifth and sixth graders will
have to clear off the tables.' The
camp people supply the beds but
not the hands to make them up
in the morning.
Blankertz Named
Graduate Director
Prof. Donald F. Blankertz, Uni-
versity alumnus, has been named
director of the Wharton School
Graduate Division of. Business and
Governmental Administration at
the University of Pennsylvania
Prof. Blankertz graduated from
the University in 1934 and receiv-
ed his master's and doctor's de-
grees in business administration
in 1935 and 1942.

%, M *Y is *

PERSONNEL REQUESTS.
The Fansteel Metallurgical Corp., in
North Chicago, Ill., is looking for an
Accountant to fill a position brought
about by the expansion of their Ac-
counting Department. Men with a de-
gree in Business Administration are
eligible to apply.
Trans World Airlines, Inc., has open-
ings for several Aernauticai, Mechanical,
and Electrical Engineers at their major
overhaul base in Kansas City, Kansas.
Positions will be concerned with pro-
ject-type engineering work. '
The Equitable Life Assurance So-}
ciety is offering an Administrative
Training Course, an Actuarial Train-
ing Program, and Sales positions to
1954 college graduates. The Administra-
tive Training Course is designed for
graduates interested in office man-
agement and general administrative
work; the Actuarial Training Program
is for math students desiring profes-
sional training in actuarial science. The
Sales positions are open to any men
graduates who are interested in the
field of life insurance sales.
Moore Business Forms, Inc., in De-
troit, is interested in talking with men
graduates about positions asSales
Trainees with their firm.
For applications and further infor-
mation about these and other employ-
ment opportunities, contact the Bureau

to Secretion. Visitors invited. 11:00 a.m.,
Oct. 21, 2501 East Medical Building.
M. A. Language Examination in His-
tory. Fri., Oct. 23, 4-5 p.m., 429 Mason
Hall. Sign list in History Office. Can
bring a dictionary.
! Concerts
String Orohestra Concert conducted
by Gilbert Ross, with Robert Courte,
Violist of the, Stanley Quartet, as solo-
ist, will be presented at 8:30 Wednesday
evening, Oct. 21, in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater. The program will include
music of the 17th and 18th centuries
composed by Stamitz, Manfredini, Boc-
cherini, Telemann. Frescobaldi, and
Handel. The general public will be ad-
mitted without charge.
Concerts. The Boston Symphony Or-
chestra, Charles Munch, Conductor, will
be heard in the Choral Union Series,
Thurs., Oct. 22, in Hill Auditorium, at
8:30 in the evening. The following pro-
gram will be heard:
Brahms' Symphony No. 2 in D major;
Honegger Symphony No. 2 for String
Orchestra; Ravel's "Le Tombeau de
Couperin;" and Excerpts from Act II,
"Die Meistersinger" by Wagner.
Tickets are available at the offices of
te University Musical Society at Bur-
ton Memorial Tower; and will also be
on sale at 7 o'clock on the evening of
teconcert at the box office in Hill
Auditorium.

/

N

-Daily-Gerry Van Otteren
DISAPPOINTED THIRD GRADER WANTS TO GO ALONG

Calendar of Events

t

TODAY-
Prof. Sydney Chapman, visiting
professor of solar and terrestial
physics from Oxford University,
will speak on "Theories of the
Geomagnetic Field and Its Chang-
es" at 4 p.m. in Rm. 1400 of the
Chemistry Bldg.
* * *
"The Use of English Archives
for Historical Researth" will be
discussed by the Rev. John S. Pur-
vis, English author and historian,
at 4:15 p.m. in Rackham Amphi-
theater.
Mr. Purvis, Director of Borth-
wick Institute of Historical Re-
search at York, is visiting Amer-
ican universities to inform Amer-
ican scholars of the archives of
the Archbishop and archdioceses
of York which date from the 13th
century.
* * *
Jiro Harada of the National
Museum in Tokyo will speak on
"Shosoin: Imperial Art Treasury
at Nara" at 8 p.m. in Auditorium
B, Angell Hall.
The lecture is sponsored by the
String Concert
The University String Orches-
tra, conducted by Prof. Gilbert
Ross of the music school, will pre-
sent a program of music of the
17th and 18th centuries at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow in the Lydia Men-'
delssohn Theater.

center for Japanese Studies and
is open to the public.
Prof. Hirsch Hootkins, examiner
in foreign languages, will address
PhD candidates concerning lan-
guage requirements for the degree
at 8 p.m. in the West Conference
Rm. of the Rackham Bldg.
I

of Appointments, 3528 Administration
Building, Ext. 371. Events Today
Union Opera Rehearsal. Will the fol-
Lectures lowing men please report to a Union
Opera rehearsal tonight at 7:30 p.m. in
University Lecture, auspices of the Room 3-G of the Michigan Union:
Center for Japanese Studies, "Shosoin: Dick Anslow, Tom Auch, Ray Bahor,
Imperial Art Treasury of Nara," by Jiro Bill Baker, Dexter Bartlett, Gene Beier,
Harada, National Museum, Tokyo, Tues., Phil Belleville, Marshall Blondy,
Oct. 20, 8 p.m., Auditorium B, Angell Gene Bohi, Dick Booth, John Brad-
Hall. ford, Dick Briggs, Russ Brown, Bob
Burns, Tom Chamberlain, Milt Con-
University Lecture, auspices of De- verse, Andy Cooley, Art Cornfield, Bob
partment of History, "The Use of Eng- Cutting,
lish Archives for Historical Research," Pete Davidson, Ron DeBouver, Peter
The Reverend John S. Pruvis, Direc- DeGroot, John DeLand, Herb Drucker,
tor, Borthwick Institute of Historical Dave Edwards, John Fortenberry, Bob
Research, York, England, Tues., Oct. Gauiz, John Geralt, Tom Gilmore, Ralph
20, 4:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater. Glowacki, Howard Green, Gene Hal-I
G__brook, George Hill, Bruce Hinrichs, Greg
Lecture by Prof. Sydney Chapman, Hooper, Nels Jensen, Kevin Keane, Dave
Lupieurebyprof.ntsydney tChapmn, Kestel, Don Kirkpatrick, Elliot Klepper,
auspices Departments of Astronomy Pete Kramer, Paul Krueger,
*Aeronautical Engineering, Physics, and Pt rmr alKugr
Geology. Tues., Oct. 20, 4 p.m., 1400 Mike Lashmet, Dan Less, David Le-
Chemistry Building. Topic, "Theories vine, Dave Levy, Gilbert Lewis, Bob
of the Geomagnetic Field and ItsL'tan, Len CoresLaMar g
Changes." Gordon Mars, Charles Mayer, George
aS g_._McIntyre, Ned Miiler, Jay Mills, Jim
Mills, Bud Moore, George Muellich,
Academ ic Notices Tom O'Keefe, John Popp, Dave Pryor,
e Ed Ravenscroft, Paul Richman, Don
Graduate Students. Prof. Hirsch Hoot- Rosenberg, Sheldon Rosenthal, Pete
kins, the Examiner in Foreign Lang- Rosko, Erwin Rubenstein, Gordon Ry-
uages, will address all graduate stu- an.
dents who have not yet passed their Earl Sayer, Jay Schoettley, Leonard
language examinations for the Doctor's Scott, Dave Seitz, Donald Seltz, Hugh
Degree on Tues., Oct. 20, at 8 p.m., Sponsel, Bill Todd, Dean Vane, .Ried
West Conference Room, Rackham Wagstaff, Art White, Bob Wiegand,
Building. Eddie Wiener, Walt Williams, Bruce
The Reading Improvement Service ork, Bil Wundram.
will accept registrations for new read- Foresters' Club meeting tonight at
ing classes Oct. 19 to 23. The classes 7:30 p.m. in 2082 Natural Science Build-
will run eight weeks, from Oct. 26 to ing. The speaker for the evening will
Dec. 18. They are non-credit, non-tui- be Mr. Ben Cardinal, field representa-
tion. Register in 210-512 S. State Street, tive of Douglas Fir Plywood Association
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
___--j La Tertulia of La Sociedad Hispanica
Seminar in Complex Variables will will have its veekly meeting at the In-
meet Tues., Oct. 20, at 3:30 p.m. in ternational Center today from 3:30 p.m.
3011 Angell Hall. Mr. John Line will to 5:30 p.m. Refreshments will be serv-
speak on "Blaschke Products." ed. Very informal. All interested in
conversing in Spanish are welcome.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAY!
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND~
FOUND-Man's Gruen autowind watch
after Friday's pep rally. Call John
Birgham, 2-7082. )20A
LOST-All my keys in their red and
white plastic keyholder, 4018 Stock-
well. Ph. 3-1561. )21A
LOST-Woman's shell rimmed glasses
in blue case on State and Williams
Monday, or Public Health School.
Phone 2-2010. )23A
LOST-Zippo lighter in Union Saturday.
Initials P.K. on inside case. Ph. 2-6015.
Reward. )26A
LOST-Women's Black Onyx diamond
inset ring. :Possibly lost in League.
Keepsake; liberal reward. Ph. 3-4701,
ask for Hugh. )24A
LOST-A young gray striped cat, South
5th Avenue. Ph. 3-0864. )25A
FOR SALE
BRAND NEW Webcor phonograph and
tape recorder. Excellent buy. Call 3-
tape recorder. Excellent buy. Call
3-0521. Extension 627. )88B
1952 HENRY J. Radio and Heater; low
mileage. Huron Motor Sales. 2-3163.
),100B
SOLID WALNUT GATELEG TABLE, $25.
One large double coil springs, $15.00.
One upholstered chair, $1.00. One large
walnut veneer table and five chairs,
$25. One wool rug, $35. Two large wal-
nut veneer ouffets, $15 each. One
small steel, folding cot, $10.00. Large
child's coaster wagon, $4.00. Phone
2-9020. )13B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
1952 PLYMOUTH, 4 dr. Cranbrook. 1
owner, 19,000 mi. R&H. Huron Motor
Sales. 2-3163. )99B
"MOTORIZED B1CYCLES"-English 3
gear Hercules with Minimotor. 1
man's and 1 woman's. Used 2 months.
Phone 3-0260. )51B
CORONNA PORTABLE - Call 2-7326.
)56B
FOR SALE. English type bike. One week
old; not deeded because have car. $30.
Phone 2-3834 between 4 & 8 P.M. )59B
1948 OLD'S; 2 dr. sedanette, one owner.
R&H. Very clean. Huron Motor Sales.
2-3163. )101B
FOR SALE - Two warm winter coats.
Strook wool, perfect condition, very
reasonable. Other wearing apparel.
Size 9-10. Ph. 2-2158. ')83B

FOR SALE-Cello and bow in excellent
condition. Call 3-4819. )92B
2 DOOR '51 CUSTOM FORD-A-1 con-
dition. Right price. Ph. 2-6700. )94B
DRAFTINGtand DRAWING Equipment
-Students 13-pc. drawing set $10.25.
Set includes 6%-in. precision com-
pass, straightening device, inter-
changeable pen and pencil parts,
lengthening bar, 6%-in. hair spring
divided; 5%-in. octagonal ruling pen;
42-in. ruling pen; 4%-in. spring head
bow divider, pen, pencil all with cen-
ter wheel adjustments plus many
more items. All brass nickle plated
instruments with tool steel working
parts. Precision Drafting Sets $16.75.
16-pc. center wheel set with Swedish
detail pen and drop bow. Made of
superior quality, solid nickle alloy.
Finest professional quality in every
detail. Log Log Synchro Scale Slide
Rule $16.95. Complete standard rule
for all engineering problems, Back
to back log log scale arrangement.
With leather case. Sears Sporting
Goods Dept. Sears Roebuck and Co.
312 S. Main St. Phone 2-5501. )97B
GIRLS: Student Laundry Sergvice. Will
call for and deliver. Phone 2552-R.
) 12B
SHOTGUN-16 gauge bolt action. Used
one season. Phone 7326 between 6
and 8 p.m. )96B
DEER RIFLE - 30.06 Springfield A-1
condition. Ph. 2-4591, rm. 317 Hins-
dale. )95B
BRAND NEW Webcor phonograph and
tape recorder. Excellent buy. Call
3-0521. Extension 627. )88B
BC-348 WITH AC SUPPLY-$50. Phone
3-3188, after 6 p.m.
"PURCHASE PROM PURCHASE"
Zeiss Ikon "Netter" F4.5 Lense, 1 thru
1/300 second. Full sync. Used, w-case
and range finder. $29.50. Purchase
Camera Shop, 1116 So. University.
)103B
GRAND PIANO KRAKAUER, Louis XVI.
5 foot, 4 inches, brown mahogany.
Excellent condition. Call after 6
p.m. Ph. 2-2713. )104B
1940 PLYMOUTH-Best offer. takes it.
616 West Madison. )103B
TYPEWRITER -Smith-Corona. Silent
model. Perfect condition. $60. Ph.
7851. )98B
EVERGREENS: at wholesale
Pfitzer Juniper.........$2.50 to $7.50
Pyramidal Arbor Vitae...$2.00 to $5.00
Spreading Yew........$2.25 to $4.50
Dwarf Mugho Pine......$2.50 to $4.00
Also Blue Spruce, Hemlock, Fir, etc.
Call Michael Lee 8574 or see me at
4100 Chem. Bldg. )36B

'ROOM-MATES UNITE! A few cents
brings you Time, Life, etc. each week.
Student Periodical, Phone 6007. )18F
TRANSPORTATIOR
DRIVING to Minnesota game. Room
for 2 or 3 passengers. Ph. 2-5180. )100
HELP WANTED
YOUNG LADY for part-time work at
soda fountain. Swift's Drug Store.
340 S. State. Ph. 2-0534. )29H
FULL OR PART TIME cab drivers, male
or female. Apply 113 South Ashley.
Phone 9382. )32H
BUSINESS SERVICES
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN; Voice
Development in singing and speak-
ing. Member research commitee;
Nat'l. Assoc. Teachers of Singing Di-
rector, Walden woods Voice Confer-
ence, Author of Emergent Voice. Stu-
dio, 715 Granger; phone 6584. )101
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
)31
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable.
Prompt service. 914 Mary Street, 3-4449.
) 4I
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales and service.
MORRILLS
314 S. State St., Phone 7177
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable bervice
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
11,z blocks east of Fast Eng. )5I-
WASHING, Finished Wori, and Hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also truning separately. Free pick-
up And delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )21
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable.
Prompt service. 914 Mary Street.
3-4449. )4I
READ Arthur Miller's article on Univ.
of Michigan in forthcoming Holiday.
Special subscription rate for EVERY-
ONE-$5 for 15 months! Student Per-
lodical Agency, Ph. 6007. )6L

FOR SALE

I

FOR SALE

PARAKEETS - Healthy, home raised
birds suitable for training. Also ca-
naries. Mrs. Ruff ins, 562 S. 7th. )85B

A NEW TUXEDO-Single breasted, size
36, price $35.00, call 9720 after 10 p.m.
)90B

G. E. RADIO-PHONOGRAPH, 4 tears
old with 78" changer and separate ROOMS FOR RENT
L.P. arm. Best offer over $25; China -- - - -
Cabinet, $15. Call 3-4855. )87B OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Reserve rooms now for Football Week-
1951 CHEV. Club Coupe; R&H. Two to ends. Rooms by Day or Week.C ampus
choose from. Special this week, $895. Tourist Homes. Ph. 3-8454. 518 Y.
Huron Motor Sales. 2-3163. )102B Williams St. (near State) )3D
WIRE RECORDER, radio, record player; PERSONA
table model combination. Ph. 3-8698.
)86B

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

'1ne Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTE;T form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).

Logic Seminar Tues. 4 p.m., 414 Ma-
son Hall, Mr. Geert Prins will conclude
Kleene's chapter on primitive recursive
functions.
Seminar in Mathematical Statistics
will meet Tues., Oct. 20, 3-5 p.m., 3201
Angell Hall. Mr. S. R, Knox will speak.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER
VOL. _LXIV, No.

20, 1953
25

Research Club of the University of
Michigan. First meeting will be held in
Amphitheater, Rackham Building to-
night at 8 p.m. The following papers
will be given: Prof. Leo Goldberg (As-
tronomy), "How Scientific Is Science
Fiction?" and Prof. Samuel Eldersveld'
(Political Science), "An Analysis of
Election Error as Revealed in Michi-
gan's Gubernatorial Recounts."
(Continued on Page 4)

Rend and Use
Daily Classifieds

GRILLED STEAK
or PORK CHOPS
daily $1.15 daily
STATE DRUG
State and Packard

Today and
Wednesday

TIn

Matinees 50c
Nights 70c

RY: LOOPER BARBARASTANWY(k"

1

J 14M~y,
1 -eAaldK- - n the
Rum ROMA ANHONY QUINNrp
STARTING THURSDAY
EVEN GREATER THAN "KING SOLOMON'S MINES"!
"'-
- I MEANS "THE GREATESTI
CLARK AA
$GAB1ErGARDNER
Actually filmed on safari in Africa!
In the smoldering depths of the jungle, amid authentic scenes
of savagery and splendor.
Department of Speech
Announces
SPECIAL STUDENT RATE 50c
THE HEIRESS
Wed. & Thurs., Oct. 28 & 29
ELIZABETH THE QUEEN
Thurs., Nov. 12
MAIL ORDERS NOW (

Notices
Regents' Meeting. Fri., Nov. 20, at
9:30 a.m. Communications for consid-
eration at this meeting must be in the
President's hands not later than Thurs.,
Nov. 12.
;chools of Education, Music, and Pub-
lie Health. Students who received marks
of I, X, or "no reports" at the end of
their last semester or summer session of
attendance will receive a grade of "E"
in the course or courses unless this work
is made up by Oct. 21 in the Schools of
Education, Music, and Public Health.
Students wishing an extension of time
beyond this date in order to make up
this work should file a petition, ad-
dressed to the appropriate official in
their school with 1513 Administration
Building, where it will be transmitted.
Calendaring of Student-Sponsored Ac-
tivities. Social chairmen and program
chairmen of student organizations are
notified that, in accordance with ac-
tion taken by the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs at its meeting of Oct. 13,
the calendar will be closed to student-
sponsored activities seven rather than
ten days prior to the beginning of a
final examination period. Final exam-
inations for the present semester begin
on Jan. 18. Activities should be sched-
uled so as to place not later than Jan.
11.
Scientific and engineering representa-
tives of the Naval Air Missile Test Cen-
ter and Naval Ordnance Test Station in
California will be on Campus October
22 and 23 to interview seniors and grad-
uate students for research and develop-
ment work relating to guided missiles,
rockets, radar, electronic equipment,
and many other areas of weapon de-
velopment and basic scientific research.
Interviews will be scheduled in the
fields of mechanical, electrical, elec-
tronic, chemical, and aeronautical engi-
neering and in physics. A very limited
number of openings exist in the fields
of civil engineering, chemistry, mathe-
matics, and metallurgy. Appointments
for interviews may be made on sched-
ules posted on bulletin boards in the
following departments: Electrical, Civil,
and Physics.
A group meeting will be held Oct

Anatomy Seminar. Dr. W. T. Demp-
ster: Regional Distribution of Body
Mass. Mr. Richard Weymouth: Relation
MATS. 50c EVES. 70c
O U"R "
Bing's most
dramatic
role!
BING
C 1ROv S BY
CLAUDE DAUPHIN
in l IEE
Also
Pete "O
Smith LOST
Cartoon
News Daily from 1 P.M,

Y'

OPENING FRIDAY
Desire Under the Elms
By Eugene O'Neil
ARTS THEATRE CLUB
2091/2 East Washington Phone 7301

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