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October 11, 1953 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-11

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PAGE TWO

,THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1953

,I--

AZERBAIJAN TO STALINGRAD:

Navy Offers

Fulbright Student Tells of Red Bondage Scholarships
_____*_* * *

By DOROTHY MYERS
Some of the most vivid memories
in the mind of Peter Kalinke,
Grad., as he reminisces about his
life before arriving at the Univer-
sity, are the five years he was a
German prisoner of war in Rus-
sian labor camps.,
The mild-mannered German
student, studying sociology and the
'Detroit Study' project on a Ful-
bright Scholarship, fumbles occa-
sionally for the English word to
describe his interesting, but gruel-
ing post-war experiences.
ORIGINALLY from Breslau,
capital of Silesia, (part of Ger-
many given to Poland after the
war), Kalinke went to Berlin to
study at the Humboldt Gymna-
sium =during the last war. Like
most civilians during that time, he
was given a war duty in addition
to his civilian work.
In Kalinke's case this consist-
ed of manning searchlights at
night to reveal British and
American planes which swarm-
ed over Berlin in numerous
bombing missions.I
Later he was made a war cor-
respondent for the Geman Army
and was stationed on the Eastern
front. After recuperating from a
wound received on front lines, he
secured employment in a Prague,
Czechoslovakia, radio station.
Near the end of the war in May,
1945, when German military dis-
cipline over Czech peoples was
See Page 4 for interpretive in-
terview with Peter Kalinke.
failing under pressure of advanc-
ing armies, large bands of parti-
sans overthrew all remnants of
German authority and gained con-
trol of Prague.
* R* s
THE FIRST women Kalinke ever
saw in shorts were ten of these
Prague partisans who arrested
him, along with all other em-
ployees of the radio station and
hordes of German soldiers sta-
tioned in the city. Kalinke de-
scribes them as "beautiful, but
brutal young women, dressed in
yellow shorts that were part of
the German African Corps uni-
form. Even today," he adds, "these
Bermuda shorts have no appeal
for me.
"We Germans spent the next
six weeks guarded by partisans
in a dank, crowded theater, nev-
er knowing what would happen
next," he recalled.
"In July of that year we were
given to the Russians, along with
20 to 30 thousand other Ger-
mans, Austrians and Rumanians,"
he said. "We were placed in, two
camps in Bucharest, Rumania, and
lived on a diet of 200 grams of
black bread daily."
AFTER A month the POW's were
coming
Events
TODAY:
Hillel Foundation will hold a
"get together" for graduate stu-
dents from 8 to 10:30 p.m.
There will be dancing and re-
freshments.
* * *
The Rev. Fr. Carroll Deady, su-
perintendant of the Archdiocesan
Parochial School System of De-
troit, will talk on "The Place of the
Parochial School in the Field of
Education in the United States" at
10:30 a.m. at a Newman Club
Communion breakfast at the Ga-
briel Richard Center, 331 Thomp-
son Street.
* * *

Prof. James K. Pollock, chair-!
man of the political science de-
partment, will report on his obser-
vations of the recent German elec-
tion at 12:30 p.m. over Detroit ra-
dio station WJR.
* * *
Robert Noehren, University or-
ganist, will give an all Bach con-
cert at 4:15 p.m. in Hill Audi-
torium as the first in a series of
three recitals.I
* * *
TOMORROW:
Prof. Nathan Sinai of the publicI
health school will talk on "Histor-
ical and Social Backgrounds of
the Modern Public Health Move-'
ment" at 4 p.m. in the School of
Public Health Auditorium.
* * *
The Michigan Rehabilitation
Conference will hold its opening
session at 9:30 a.m. in the Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
RECORD DA

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-Daily-Don Campbell
STUDIOUS LIFE--German student returns to scholarly life after
five years in Russian prison camps.

Scholarships totaling $5,000
apiece are being offered by the
Navy to students who can qualify
in its college training program as
regulars in the Naval Reserve Of-
ficers' Training Corps, Lt. Rich-
ard M. Davis, assistant professor of
naval science revealed this week.
The eighth in a series of nation-
wide competitive examinations for
admission to the four year pro-
gram has been scheduled for Dec.
12, 1953. Those students passing
the test and admitted to the pro-
gram will be commissioned as of-
ficers in the Navy or Marine Corp
upon graduation.
* * *
THE PROGRAM is open to male
citizens between the ages of 17 and
21 years. Lt. Davis emphasized
this would include many students
already enrolled in the University
on the undergraduate level.
Those in the regular NROTC
program are appointed Mid-
shipmen in the United States
Naval Reserve and will be given
their tuition, books, and subsis-
tence pay amounting to $600 a
year during the four-year per-
iod. Along with uniforms fur-
nished under the program, tra-
veling expenses for each of the
three summer cruises and pay
while on the cruises, the total
scholarship equals nearly $5,000.
Between each academic year the
Midshipmen go on six to eight
week summer cruises in various
ships of the fleet to provide prac-
tical training aboard ship. The
three summer cruises include one
to Europe, one to South America
and the Carribean and one Amphi-
bious and Aviation cruise in Nor-
folk, Va., and Corpus Christi, Tex.
Upon graduation the Midship-

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 tc 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.

OWNER must get rid of one of his two
cars. See a '47 Nash. renewed condi-
tion. Mobil gas station. Hill and
Packard. Best offer. )61B
MIMEOGRAPH-8 months old-$95.00.1
Speed-o-Print model 200. Call 2-3667.
S69B
1953 BUICK RIVIERA ROADMASTER-
Only 6,000 miles. Loaded with extras.
Call 3-5806 Monday-Friday. )68B

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* * *

* ,kt

herded into closed boxcars. "The Stalingrad. For the first time
Russians told us we were being we saw East German communist
sent home," he recalled. "During newspapers and found out what
the next 16 days we stayed huddled was happening back home," he
in moving boxcars, getting less said.
food than before."
At night I worked on the Volga
When people died in the box- River, catching logs off floats and
cars, a common occurrence, he putting them on an assembly line.
explained, they were just tossed Some of the prisoners went blind
out on the ground and left there. drinking wood alcohol made in
"Today the road is called the city, which they smuggled out
'Street of the Dead' because of in rubber hoses worn around the
the number of skeletons still waist, he went on. "If they were
there," he recalled. caught, he added, they were em-
,, prisoned for an additional six
"Instead of home," he continued, iefti
"we found ourselves in Kirowobad, years.
Azerbaijan, near the Persian bor- THE POW'S worked with Rus-
der in Russia. sian civilians in Stalingrad and
All of the area near Kirowobad, got, for the first time, "good pay
he explained, is a "punishment" and more food. We had to fill a
area for Russian criminals, politi- certain norm of work to get any
cal prisoners and POW's. "I fig- pay at all," he added, "but condi-
ured," he said, "that 120,000 or tions were far better than they
F more prisoners were in Azerbai- had been." -
jan camps."
* * * In September, POW's were
A ROCKY, mountainous area either released or sent to a civil-
with sub-tropical climates, Azer- ian jail for 15 to 25 years, after
baijan is inhabited by nomadic and long interrogation periods, he
peasant peoples. As prisoners, liv- continued, but no one knew why
ing only in tents and receiving lit- either fate was doled out. In De-
tle food, Kalinke said "our job cember half the camp was re-
was to break up rock on these leased, after being given new
mountains into forms suitable for shoes, food, clothes, candy and
use on railroad beds. cigarettes.
"During the three years I After another box car ride I ar-
was there, I saw entire moun- rved in East Germany, he said,
tains hauled away with nothing but my parents warned me not to
more than shovels, wheelbarrows stay. "I hitched a ride to the West-
and hands," he recalled em Zone and was greeted with
tmany celebrations and parties.
Few tried to escape, "mostly "The average prisoner took sev-..
because we were all to weak to try," eaI years to integrate into civil-
lhe went on. "Our only thought ian life," he said. Many committed
was how to bet more bread." Be- suicide and others went into men-
sides, the native people received tal hospitals.
several thousand rubles and extra
food rations for bringing back the
head of any escapee, so the few AF O fficers
that did try never succeeded, he
said. Visit Cam nus
Inside the camp we had corn
plete freedom, Kalinke continued.'
Russian officers stayed outside Col. Lewis H. Kensinger and Ma-
camp, prefering to see us fight jor Curtiss P. Fritsch of Liaison
among ourselves than with them, Group F, Air Force ROTC head-
he said. quarters, Montgomery, Ala., who
An NKVD officer was the only concluded a three day visit at the
Russian to enter. Working at night, University, expressed satisfaction
the officer organized spies and at the Air Force ROTC's facilities
agents all over camps, and seemed and operations.
almost a personification of the Acting as contacts between the
devil, he recalled. Air Force ROTC headquarters and
the units in the field, the visiting
officers said they had a very high
p IN THoE FIRST two years, 42 regard for the University's unit
r cent of the prisoners died, an and felt that the Air Force ROTC's
the third year another 61 per mission is being accomplished very
cent went, he said, but after that well.
the weakest had gone and those The two officers also conferred
lfi h , with University administrative of-
"I left Azerbaijan in Septem- ficials but termed the talks social
ber, 1948, and was taken to visits with no new developments
in the ROTC program resulting at
Petitions Due this time.
For Michigras Student Programs
Petitions for the 1954 Michigras Will Be Featured
central committee are idue at 5
p.m. tomorrow in the League un- Two student produced programs
dergraduate office, according to of the speech department and te-
Hal Abrams, '54, Michigras co- levision office will be featured ov-
chairman. er WPAG-TV at 6:45 p.m. tomor-
During the week interviews for row.
F the posts, will be held in the Lea- "Dateline Ann Arbor" will be
gee. Abrams said petitions are still the first program followed by "229
available in the Union and Lea- Weekly of the Air" which will re-
gue, present art, music, education and
- aviation. The show will include,

FOR SALE ROOM AND BOARD BUSINESS SERVICES

. I441951 CHEV. Convertible Customized.
Loaded with extras. Huron Motor
LOST AND FOUND Sales. Ph. 2-3136. )77B
LOST-Men's brown horn-rimmed glass- 1948 DODGE-New motor, 820 mi. R.A.D.
es. Bill Merner. Law Club, 3-4145. )8A spot. Excellent buy. Best offer. K.
Brown at 3-5806. )71B
LOST-One pair of dark horn rimmed1
glasses. Scarred upper left rim. Call "KAY" BASS VIOLIN-New strings and
2-1348. )13A blond finish. Excellent tone. K.
Brown at 3-5806. )70B
LOST-One Agfa camera and case at
Tulane game. Bill Marcou. Phone 1937 DODGE-Good condition. Best of-
2-7409. )18A fer. Call 2-8753. )72B
LOST-One light blue girl's jacket, in~- ~~~ ~ ~ ~~~ ~~
vicinity of Diag. If found, phone PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE "Kord-
2-3219. )17A O-Tex." Gadget Bag-only $7.95. Pur-
----~-___ -- - --- Fchase Camera Shop. 1116 S. University.
LOST-tan wallet. Reward. GeraldLose )73B
P FOR SALE-Used Motorbikes; M en's
FOR SALE Used Bicycles. Whizzer Motor Sales.
654 So. Main. )78B
1936 CHEV. 2 Dr. Heater, radio. Runs
perfect. Huron Motor Sales. Phone FOR RENT
2-3163. )74B
3-ROOM furnished basement apart-
SOLID WALNUT GATELEG TABLE, $25. Fment. Girls only. 820 Hill St., Phone
One large double coil springs, $15.00. merit.G)8C,
One upholstered chair, $1.00. One large 3-5375._)9C
walnut veneer table and five chairs, ROOMS FOR RENT
$25. One wool rug, $35. Two large wal- RO MSFO.RN
nut veneer ouffets, $15 each. One --- -- -- -----
small steel folding cot, $10.00. Large OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
child's coaster wagon, $4.00. Phone Reserve rooms now for Football Week-
2-9020. 1138 ends. Rooms by Day or Week. Campus
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox, Tourist Homes. Ph. 3-8454. 518 E.
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies. Williams St. (near State} )3D,
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. 114B-

STILL A FEW room and board openingsa
at 1617 Washtenaw. Room $30 per
month. Free linen and porter service.
Board $2.10 per day for three meals.I
Phone 3-2360. 16E
BOARD for southeast campus area.
$2.10 per day. Three meals. Generous
refund policy. 1617 Washtenaw. Ph.1
3-2360. )7E
PERSONAL
PIANO INSTRUCTION - Don-David
Lusterman is now accepting students
for the new school year. Phone 6719.1
)3F
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED to Oxford, Ohio October
24. Dick Moellering, 719 Arbor. Tel.
2-1138. )8G
WANTED RIDE for two for Illinois
game. Friday after 5 or Sat, morn.
)9G

TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales and service.
MORRILLS
314 S. State St., Phone 7177
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN: Voice
{Development in singing and speak-
ing. Member research commitee,
Nat'l. Assoc. Teachers of Singing Di-
rector, Walden Woods Voice Confer-
ence, Author of Emergent Voice. Stu-
dio, 715 Granger; phone 6584. )10I
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-
up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )21
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and ReasonableAService
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1'2 blocks east of Fast Eng. )5I
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable,
Prompt service. 914 Mary Street. 3-4449.
I )41
TYPING Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main. )31
GIRLS: Student Laundry Service. Will
call for and deliver. Phone 2552R. )12B
MISCELLANEOUS
STUDENT specials to Time, Life, etc.
Phone Student Periodical, 25-7843. )1L
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED-Rooms for Medical School
Reunion. Single and double rooms
are needed for medical alumni return-
ing to Ann Arbor wishing to rent
& rooms for this period are urgently
asked to call the Medical School Of-

HELP WANTED
TRAINEE WANTED for night super-
vision. Top pay. 7 to 11:30 p.m. Six
nights. Apply Mrs. Rahn, State Drug
& Fountain, State and Packard. )25H
EARN AS YOU STUDY! Ideal year
round full time job for mechanically
inclined student. Time off for up to
7 class hours; and you may study on
the job. Phone 2-2887. )26H
YOUNG LADY for part-time work at
soda fountain. Swift's Drug Store.
340 S. State. Ph. 2-0534. )29H
READ AND USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

I fice. Ph. 3-1,511, ext. 413.

)1S

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men are commissioned Ensigns
and serve on active duty for a
three year period at which time
they have the option of resigning'
from the Navy or continuing asI
career officers.I
Graduates of the program havej
four choices as to the branches of
the Navy establishment they would
like to enter. These four branches
include general line duty or mili-
tary command duties afloat and
ashore, naval aviations, supply
corps and the Marine Corp.
Bowles Slated
'For AsiaTalk
Chester A. Bowles, former am-
bassador to India, will discuss "Our
Best Hope for Peace in Asia" in
the first of this year's Lecture Se-
ries at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, in Hill
Auditorium.
Bowles has had considerable ex-j
perience in Asia and is consideredI
an expert in that area. After serv-
ing a term as American delegate
to UNESCO, he was appointed Am-
bassador to India by former Presi-
dent Truman. In this position he
was able to observe at closemquar-
ters the American policy aimed at
decreasing Communist influence
in the East.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

YOUNG BUDGIES or Parakeets, also
singing canaries, bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. 7th, Ph. 3-5330. )15B
EVERGREENS: at wholesale
Pfitzer Juniper...........$2.50to $7.50
Pyramidal Arbor Vitae . $2.00 to $5.00
Spreading Yew..........$2.25 to $4.50
Dwarf Mugho Pine. $2.50 to $4.00
Also Blue Spruce, hemlock, fir, etc.
Call Michael Lee 8574. )36B
1949 CHEV. 4 dr. DeLuxe. Heater. 2 to;
choose from. Huron Motor Sales.
Ph. 2-3163. )75B
"MOTORIZED BICYCLES"-English 31
gear Hercules with Minimotor. 1
man's and 1 woman's. Used 2 months.
Phone 3-0260. )51B
CORONNA PORTABLE - Call 2-7326
FOR SALE. English type bike. One week
old; not deeded because have car. $30.
Phone 2-3834 between 4 & 8 P.M. 59B
1951 ,HILLMAN MINX - One owner.
Heater, radio. Low mileage. Huron
Motor Sales. Ph. 2-3163. )76B
1953 MOTOR SCOOTER-Used less than
one month. Perfect condition, 3 h.p.
Visor. Cost me $230, will sell for $165.
Call Dexter 3109 after 5:30 p.m. )63B
Fountain Pens
Greeting Cards
Stationery
Office S-applies
Typewriters
W/C Tape &
Wire Recorders =
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files
BUJMArJFre o n
MORRILL'S Phone
314 S. Stat.e7177
Open Sat. 'til 5 P.M. except on
Home Games-Open 'til 12 Noonj

ORPHEUM
Ending Today
ELlA KAZAN
MASTERPIECE!

I

Scientific
SWEDISH MASSAGE
STEAM BATHS
SPOT REDUCING
Body Conturing
Service
For Better Mental
and Physical Health
K. Jewell R. Jewell
K and R-J Health Studio
Ground Floor 324 E. Liberty, Phone 2-6428. OPEN EVENINGS
Located next to Colonial Yarn Shop

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Cinema SL uld
presents

I

watchedl 'o
FREDRIC MARCH
GLORIA GRAHAME
Coming FRIDAY!
Italy's Greatest Acress
ANNA MAGNANI
in her prize winnig performance
"BELLISSIMA"

ALEC GUINNESS
in
Kind Hearts and
Coronets
LAST SHOWING-8:00 only

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50c
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

Starting TODAY!

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1953
VOL. LXIV, No. 18
Notices
University Senate. A special meeting
will be held on Mon., Oct. 12, at 4:t5
p.m., Auditorium A, Angell Hall to con-
sider the report of the Joint Commit-
tee on Demotion and Dismissal Proce-
The Selective Service Colige Qualifi-
cation Test will be given here on
Thurs., Nov. 19. Application deadline
Nov. 2.
It is recommended that all men who
have not previously taken the test make
application for it at Ann Arbor Selec-
tive Service Board No. 85, 208 West
Washington. The Selective Service Board
will then notify applicants of time
and place.
The result of this test is used by
your local draft board for determining
college defernent.
The test will be given again on April
22, 1954.
Newly Admitted M.B.A. Candidates:
The special admissions examination
scheduled for all newly admitted M.B.A.
candidates at Michigan and Harvard will
take place Tues., Oct. 13, at 3 p.m., in
the School of Business Administration
building. Room and seat assignments
have been made.
Mortgage Loans. The University is in-
terested in making first-mortgage loans

ill ? - °-, , r' } .
..r

Forbidden
Paradise of the
South. Pacific

Ruled by exotic rites and primitive
passions, until a white man's love
for a tawny beauty turned the
tropic night
into a mael-
strom of savage
violence!

'Es ian Sal esiten
A meeting for all students in-
terested in selling the '54 Michi-
ganensian will be held at 4:30 p.-
m. Tuesday in the Student Publi-
cations Bldg.
Salesmen will receive commis-I
sions on the yearbooks they sell.
kNCE ...

interviews, a documentary and
songs,
" 55c
Ending Today
BOB MICKEY

JEFF CHANDLER
EAmmT aOF
co-starring
MARILYN MAXWELL
ANTHONY QUINN

-

-'-i
IMAGINE FINDING THIS SUBPRISE PACKAGE IN YOUR APARTMENT,
. . and wearing your pajamas, too! What would you do . ..what did
the reporter do ... see "ROMAN HOLIDAY" and find out for yourself!

,... ..... - a. . _ ,., _ .,.........

"A tired world needs happy pic-
tures like 'Roman Holiday''"
-E,cniQ Newsnj

GREGORY is the guy
AT 7T~7 JLJ J-FPIR \TPJ\J N .th* "

Awmr I r 0 i 0 m 0 11

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