100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 07, 1953 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1953

I

W"m

WUOM FEATURE:
Felheim To Broadcast
Michigan Novel Reviews

By RONA FRIEDMAN
,In a negative way, the new
University radio program 'They
Wrote About Michigan' has a posi-
tive value," said Professor Marvin
Felheim of the English depart-
ment who will review the novels
written about Michigan weekly be-
ginning today at 4:45 p.m. on
Wednesdays on station WUOM
and WFUM.
"Though the writing included on
the fifteen minute program is bad
literature," Felheim continued, "it
has definite historical value show-
ing significant changes in literary
and social tastes in attitudes as
well as making an interesting study
of the form of the novel.
w* *,
"THE NOVELS picture Michi-
gan as an outdoor wonderland and
represent America's great interest
in local color. They deal with sub-
jects such as the lumber and min-
ing industries in Michigan, de-
pending solely on dramatic im-
pact disregarding the profound."
The program will begin with
Janes Fenimore Cooper's book,
ak Openings" and will include
in the following programs works
by James Oliver Curwood, Edna
Ferber, Stewart Edward White
and Kenneth Roberts.
"As an instructor in a state uni-
versity I feel that my duty lies not
Council OK's
Milk Ordinance

only in teaching the students but
towards the whole state. The Uni-
versity programs," he explained,
"eventually reach most parts of
the state. Although the stations
we broadcast over are only heard
in the local area. The programs
are taped and sent to radio sta-
tions throughout the state.
The program Felheim narrated
last year for the English depart-
ment, which was a review of con-
temporary novels, fizzled out be-
cause when the tapes reached oth-
er stations in Michigan the books
had already become obscur.
"We never know just how much
of the public we are reaching," he
said, "but then one never knows
how much communication there
actually is in University classes.
However a pole taken last year by
station WUOM placed University
educational programs second."
Smiling he concluded, "But I
have received some very curious
fan letters."
Carillonneur J
ToIPlayFuga
Sidney F. Giles, assistant Caril-
lonneur, will continue his current
series of evening concerts at 7:15
p.m. tomorrow.
Giles will be heard playing Fu-.
ga, a collection of folk songs in-
cluding "Beautiful Isle of Some-
where," "Carry Me Back to Old
Virginny," "Whispering Hope" and
"Down by the Old Mill Stream."
A group of compositions for the
Carillon by Staf Nees will be fea-
tured in the conceit. Largo, from
the New World Symphony will con-
clude the program.

SL Agenda
Student Legislature will take
up the following items of busi-
ness when it meets at 7:30 p.m.
today in Strauss Dining Room,
East Quad:
Academic Freedom Motion
Introduction of new Execu-
tive Wing Staff
Approval of Homecoming
Dance Committee Appoint-
ments
Election Rules Committee re-
port
Report on the Radulovich
Case
All interested students and
faculty members have been in-
vited by SL to attend the meet-
ing.

Grads Study
City Housing
For Adequacy
A graduate class in survey re-
search will assist a local citizens
committee in a study of Ann Ar-
bor housing, it was learned yester-
day.
Tht class will conduct a sci-
entific housing survey this fall in
order to determine the adequacy
of housing in the Ann Arbor area.
Mrs. Florence Crane, committee
chairman, said it is hoped that
the survey will help locate any
possible trouble areas. Detailed
studies of these areas will then be
made.
After the survey questions are
carefully and objectively formu-
lated, the class, assisted by local
residents, will canvass the town.
The survey will be done free of
charge to the city, Mrs. Crane
concluded.

By WALLY EBERHARD
While the surgical technique of
replacing human arteries with an-
imal arteries is a great medical
advancement, it is not expected to
change the University hospital
technique of replacing damaged
human arteries according to a
surgery professor at the medical
school.
An announcement was made
Monday at a meeting of the Amer-
ican College of Surgeons in Chi-
cago that four men are now liv-
ing with new arteries taken from
calves and a pig.
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY Hospital
physician said the advantage in
using animal arteries lies in the
fact that it opens up a new source
of supply for surgeons. The Uni-
versity is presently using arteries
obtained during post-mortem ex-
aminations in hospital cases.
He said, "Only occasional
cases need such grafts and our
present sources will probably do
until a greater need develops."
SL Freedom
Group Meets
Methods of focusing campus in-
terest around the issue of academic
freedom was center of attention
yesterday at the first meeting of
the Academic Freedom Commis-
sion.
Organized by the Student Legis-
lature under the chairmanship of
Paula Levin, '55, the commission
consists of representatives from
many campus groups, including
those with political and religious
affiliations, as well as service or-
ganizations.

Use of Animal Arteries
Not Seen for 'U' Hospital

I

"The feat is unique in that it
marks the first-time repeal of a
law of nature which has prevent-
ed giving humans new hearts,
lungs, and other organs when the
oroginals are sick or damaged.
Before now, nature's laws have
tended to destroy parts trans-1
planted from animals to humans,"
he went on.
The new process was developed
by Dr. Charles Hufnagel, Pierre
J. Rabil and Lois Reed of George-
town University medical center in
Washington, D. C. It involves
quick-freezing and drying the an-
imal arteries in a vacuum and ster-
ilazation with a gas, ethylene ox-
ide.
Dr. William D. Brace of the
Health Service said it was a "won-
derful discovery that will be help-
ful in surgery and probably save
many lives."
Regent To Preside
At VA Ceremony
University Regent Roscoe O.
Bonisteel will preside over dedi-
cation ceremonies on Oct. 18 for
the new $7,000,000 Veteran's Ad-
ministration hospital in Ann Ar-
bor. Dr. Morley B. Beckett, hospital
manager, announced yesterday.
Addresses will be made by Har-
vey V. Higley, federal administra-
tor of veterans affairs and Vice-
Adm. Joel T. Boone, chief medi-
cal director of the VA.
Gov. Williams, Michigan Sena-
tors Potter and Ferguson, Rep.
George Meader, University Presi-
dtnt Harlan H. Hatcher, and Dr.
A. C. Furstenburg, dean of the
medical school, will attend the

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24.1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Men's brown horn-rimmed glass-
es. Bill Merner, Law Club, 3-4145. )8A'
FOUND-Student football book, Sec-
tion 27. Must identify both seat and
row. 2-2308. )9A
FOUND-Woman's black cameo ring.
Delmaye Wyllie. 6548 Alice Lloyd.
)10A
LOST-Pair of eyeglasses. Tan leather'
case. Call 2-3219. Jay Katz. )11A
LOST-Pair of glasses. Brown frame.
On Geddes near the Arb. Reward. Call
554 Williams Hse. West Quad. )12A
FOR SALE

FOR SALE
1949 PLYMOUTH club coupe special de-
luxe 2nd series. Excellent condition.
Have t osell. See Robert Wolfu. 1130
Oakland. Back entrance. )64B
1953 MOTOR SCOOTER-Used less than
one month. Perfect condition, 3 h.p.
Visor. Cost me $230, will sell for $165.
Call Dexter 3109 after 5:30 p.m. )63B
BRAMBACH baby grand piano. Can be
seen at 1232 White St. )62B
OWNER must get'rid of one of his two
cars. See a '47 Nash, renewed condi-
tion. Mobil gas station. Hill and
,Packard. Best offer. )61B
LOST-One Agfa camera and case at
Tulane game. Bill Marcou. Phone
2-7409. )60B
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE NOW -Ten room unfur-
nished duplex on campus. Children
welcome. $125 per month plus heat
and utilities. Call Mr. Hansen at
3-1511, Ext. 2662. ) 8C
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Reserve rooms now for Football Week-
ends. Rooms by Day or Week. Campus
Tourist Homes. Ph. 3-8454. 518 E.
Williams St. inear State) )3D
ROOM AND BOARD
STILL A FEW room and board openings
at 1617 Washtenaw. Room $30 per
month. Free linen and porter service.
Board $2.10 per day for three meals.
Phone 3-2360. )6E
BOARD for southeast campus area.
$2.10 per day. 'Three meals. Generous
refund policy. 1617 Washtenaw. Ph.
3-2360. )7E
PERSONAL
VOICE LESSONS-Call David Murray.
Graduate voice major. Corrected Ph.
2-7306 between 6-7 p.m. )9I
ATT'N. G. FAWKES-Ready with wick.
Where's tunnel? Bx 1. )9F
IWHY NOT ENJOY A WEEKLY NEWS
MAGAZINE (TIME, U.S. NEWS, LIFE)
AT DAILY NEWSPAPER PRICES?
PHONE YOUR ORDER TO STUDENT
PERIODICAL AGENCY, 6007; PAY
LATER. )8F
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED RIDE-Or will accept riders
to Dearborn daily Mon. thru Fri. Call
6858 after 5 p.m. )6G

HELP WANTED
TRAINEE WANTED for night super-
vision. Top pay. 7 to 11:30 p.m. Six
nights. Apply Mrs. Rahn, State Drug
& Fountain, State and Packard. )25H
WAITER WANTED - Board job. Call
Gibbons after 6:30 P.M. 2-2252. )24H
EARN AS YOU STUDY! Ideal year
round full time job for mechanically
inclined student. Time off for up to
7 class hours; and you may study on
the job. Phone 2-2887. )26H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales and servicb,
MORRILLS
314 S. State St., Phone 7177

RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast andReasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.Y.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
11, blocks east of East Eng.

:

I

)SI

The Ann Arbor
approved a new
requirting dairies'

city council has
milk ordinance
to place "hoods"

ceremonies scheduled
1:30 p.m.

to begin at}

on all containers up to three gal-
lons in size.
Under the new code, passed
unanimously over objections from
local dairy owners, all milk in
quantities up to flve gallons must
$e in paper or glass containers,
thereby eliminating metal car-
riers.
The new rule also opens;up Ann
Arbor to outside dealers by elimi-
nating the restrictions on those
permitted to sell milk here.
Carport Scheduled
To Open Soon
The new Maynard St. Carport
opening and dedication has been
set for November 10 by the Ann
Arbor city council Monday night.
All Ann Arbor public parking
facilities will be open for inspec-
tion on this date, the council de-
cided.
-.
Economists Meet
Jan Timbergen of the Nether-
lands School of Economics will
speak at 3 p.m. tomorrow in the
Rackham Amphitheater on "Prob-
lems of Economic Integration in
Western Europe."
Timbergen's talk is sponsored
by the economics department and
open to the public.
Award Given
Shirley Swinson, 54Ph, was pre-
sented the Borden Award by Dean
Tom D.. Rowe of the pharmacy
school at last night's meeting of
the University student branch of
the American Pharmaceutical As-
sociation.
Scholars o Meet
A meeting will be held at 4:15
p.m. today in Rm. 2013 Angell Hall
for all men interested in applying
for Rhodes Scholarships.
READ AND USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
pEAN JERRY
tol ig

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

SOLID WALNUT GATELEG TABLE, $25.
One large double coil springs, $15.00.
One upholstered chair, $1.00. One large
walnut veneer table and five chairs,
$25. One wool rug. $35. Tw.o large wal-
nut veneer buffets, $15 each. One
small steel folding cot, $10.00. Large
child's coaster wagon, $4.00. Phone
2-9020. )13B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39e; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
YOUNG BUDGIES or Parakeets, also
singing canaries, bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. 7th, Ph. 3-5330. )15B
EVERGREENS: at wholesale
Pfitzer Juniper ..........$2.50 to $7.50
Pyramidal Arbor Vitae . $2.00'to $5.00
Spreading Yew ..........$2.25 to $4.50
Dwarf Mugho Pine ......$2.50 to $4.00
Also Blue Spruce, hemlock, fir, etc.
Call Michael Lee 8574. )36B
PURCHASE at "PURCHASE" - Two-
section tripod with pan head. Regular
$13.75, special $9.25. Purchase Camera
Shop, 1116 S. University. )50B
"MOTORIZED BICYCLES"-English 3
gear 'Hercules with Minimotor. 1
man's and 1 woman's. Used 2 months.
Phone 3-0260. )51B
WEIMARANER PUPPIES -- Choice
champ. Stock Imp. P. O. Box No. 638.
Battle Creek, Mich. )55B
CORONNA PORTABLE - Call 2-7326.
)56B
FOR SALE. English type bike. One week
old; not deeded because have car. $30.
Phone 2-3834 between 4 & 8 P.M. )59B
KAISER 148; Good condition, low price
Call 8119. Ask Al, 58B
MEN'S size 38 clothing (pants 31-32):
Blue stripe worsted suit, $15; Double
breasted tuxedo. $20; Two Donegal
slacks, $4 each. Ph. 3-1353. )65B

WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-
up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )21
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN; Voice
Development in singing and speak-
ing. Member research commitee;
Nat'l. Assoc. Teachers of Singing Di-
rector, Walden Woods Voice Confer-
ence, Author of Emergent Voice. Stu-
dio, 715 Granger; phone 6584. )10I
WANTED TO BUY
TAPE RECORDER WANTED-Need not
operate. Low cost desired. 3-0521,
Ext. 673. )3J
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED-Rooms for Medical School
Reunion. Single and double rooms
are needed for medical alumni return-
ing to Ann Arbor wishing to rent
rooms for this period are urgently
asked to call the Medical School Of-
fice. Ph. 3-1511, ext. 413. )1K
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE by owner. Burns Park area,
near bus lines and schools. Colonial
type home; three bedrooms and bath
on second fTior. Kitchen, dining room,
panelled sun room on first floor.
Basement room with toilet, shower,
lavatory, laundry room. Gas heat.
Phone 8282 mornings or evenings.
Price $22,000. )20

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1953
VOL. LXIV, No. 14
Notices
Graduate students expecting to re-'
ceive the master's degree in Feb., 1954,'
must file a diploma application with
the Recorder of the Graduate School
by Fri., Oct. 9. A student will not be
recommended for a degree unless he
has filed formal application in the
office of the Graduate School.
A Directory of Student Organizations
will be issued, listing the name, address,
and telephone of the president of each
organization. To be included in this
publication, it is necessary thgt organi-
zations be registered on or before Oc-
tober 9. Privileges such as the use of
the Daily Official Bulletin and the
use of rooms in University buildings for
meetings and activities will be ex-
tended only to registered organizations.
Registration forms may be secured in
the Office of Student Affairs, 1020 Ad-
ministratikon Building.
Freshman Testing Program. A make-
up session for freshmen who missed
all of the tests during the orientation

week. Please report to Auditorium B,
Angell Hall, at 6:30 p.m. on Wed., Oct.
7. The session will last until 10:30 p.m.
Social Events sponsored by student
organizations at which both men and
women are to be present must be reg-
istered in the Office of Student Af-
fairs, and are subject to approval by
the Dean of Students. Application
forms and a copy of regulations gov-
erning these events may be secured in
the Office of Student Affairs, 1020 Ad-
ministration Building. Requests for ap-
proval must be submitted to that of-
fice not later than noon of the Mon-
day before the event is scheduled. A
list of approved social events will be
published in the Daily Official Bulletin
on Thursday of each week.
In planning social programs for the
semester, social chairmen will want to
keep in mind the action of the Com-
mittee on Student Affairs which re-
quires that the calendar be kept clear
of student sponsored activities for the
ten days prior to a final examination
period. Final examinations for the pres-
ent semester begin January 18. There-
fore, no events can be approved which
are scheduled to take place after Jan-
uary 7.
Choral Union members are reminded
to pick up their courtesy passes admit-
ting to the Roberta Peters concert, on
the day of the performance, Wed., Oct.
7-between the hours of 9:30 and 11:30,
and 1 and 4, at the offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society in Burton Me-
morial Tower. After 4 o'clock no passes
will be issued.
Rhodes Scholarships. A meeting of all
those interested in Rhodes Scholar-

ships will be held on Wed., Oct. 7, at I Correction. The University Lecture by

4:15 p.m., in 2013 Angell Hail. Applica-
tions for Rhodes Scholarships will be
due on Fri., Oct. 16, 2026 Angell Hall.
Those interested who are unable to at-
tend the meeting are urged to consult
Prof. Hopkins, 2011 Angell Hall.
Personnel Request. Rem-Cru Titan-
ium, Inc., in Midland, Pa., is interested
in employing 1954 graduates in the fields
of Metallurgical, Mechanical, Indus-
trial, or Electrical Engineering to train
for responsible positions resulting from
the firm's expansion. If enough stu-
dents are interested in these oppor-
tunities, the company will make a trip
to the campus for interviews. Further
information and applications may be
secured at the Bureau of Appointments,;
3528 Administration Building, Ext. 371.
Lectures
University Lecture by James A. Hous-
ton, Arctic Representative of the Ca-
nadian Handicrafts Guild, "Eskimo
Stone Carvers," Thurs., Oct. 8, Audi-'
toriium B, Angell Hall. Sponsored by
the Museum of Art and the Department
of Anthropology in connection with the
exhibition "Eskimo Stone Carving" now
current in Alumni Memorial Hall. The
public is invited.

Professor Jan Timbergen, of the Neth-
erlands School of Economics, Director
of the Central Planning Bureau of
the Netherlands Government, original-
ly scheduled for 3 o'clock Thurs., Oct.
8, will be held instead at 4 o'clock on
that day in the Rackham Amphitheater.
His topic will be "Problems of Eco-
nomic Integration in Western Europe."l
Topology Seminar will meet Wed.,
Oct. 7, at 11 am., 311 Angell Hall. Dr.
Titus will speak on the "Image of the
Boundary of the Disc under a Local
Homeomorphism."1
Academic Notices
Makeup examination in Economics 51,
52, 53, and 54 will be given on Fri., Oct.
9, at 3 p.m. in 202 Economics Building.
Engineering Mechanics Seminar will
meet Wed. Oct. 7, 3:30 p.m., 101 West
Engineering Building. Professor J.
Shea's subject will be "The Dancing
Cable." Refreshments will be served.
Course 401, the Interdisciplinary Sem-
inar in the Application of Mathematics
to the Social Sciences, will meet on
(Continued on Page 4)

I

READ
DAILY
CLASS I FIEDS

I

7

}

Memberships Now On Sale
for our 1953-54 season
at Marshall's Book Store, Wahr's Book Store,
the Music Center, and
THE ARTS THEATER CLUB
209 1/2 E..Washington .. . Phone 7301
"A Professional Company - A Members' Theater"

When you . nv your beer,
...T'S BOUNDTO'BE SBUD
A sizzling steak or tangy barbecue...
everything tastes better with Bud.
it's brewed that way, by the costliest
iW .process known. And it's enjoyed
so much that it has pleased
more people than any
other beer in history.

I

jiIC 110

MATINEES 50c EVES. 70c
The master story teller

>-
c; .
2;.
:_ ,:
;;it
Z: : i. ::i '
,o.
} } . $ k
;:r:

4

-
t

.
t,.

'

Serve
B ue .w . U U R

At, mrr*A& .-,--.:.:..:,:,
ia f9 4

0

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan