100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 02, 1952 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1952

RAMA GROUP GROWS:
Arts Theater To Present
Matinees for Children

The Arts Theater Club announ- 1
d yesterday that it will expand T
s arena-style drama activities C
LiS year to include sponsorship of a
Children's Theater.' t
Planned as a self-sustaining ac- o
vity, the theater will use both g

0:30 a.m. Saturday at the Arts
Theater, 2091/2 E. Washington.
Children over eight years old and
adults interested in acting, cos-
uming, secretarial duties and
ther phases of production may
;et information about working
with the theater at the meeting.

children and adults in a voluntary
capacity for work in production as
well as acting.
FIRST TRYOUT meetings for
the new enterprise will be held at
'' Expands
Near Eastern
Study Course
Continuing its expansion of the
increasingly significant Near East
studies, the University is now ini-
tiating an extensive program for
specialist training, President Har-
lan H. Hatcher announced yester-
day.
The expanded study program on
the critical Near East area, offer-
ed to undergraduate and gradu-
ate students, is being made pos-
sible with a $100,000 grant from
the Ford Foundation. The grant
was made as part of the program
of the Foundation's Division of
Overseas Activities
* *, *
PRESIDENT HATCHER pointed
out that the University's Near East
program, the most extensive in
the country, is designed to help
fulfill the need for "more detailed
and intimate understanding of
the people of the Near East."
Covering North Africa, the
Arab countries, Israel, Turkey
and Iran, the broad study will
include the social, economic and
political structure of the area
as well as its history, religions
and cultures.
Chairman of the Near Eastern
Studies department, Prof. George
G. Cameron, will direct the pro-
gram.
'UJ' Speech Dept.
To Present Play
Opening the University speech
department's fall series of plays
will be "The Shadow and the
Rock," a new work by John Mur-
dock, a University graduate.
The play, scheduled to open a
three-day run on Oct. 30 in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, will
be directed by Prof. Valentine
Windt of the speech department.

Created because of a need the
group saw for a local children's
theater, the project will be di-
rected by Kenneth Rosen, '53,
an experienced participant in
speech department productions.
Rosen has also worked four
years with the Boston's Children
Theater.
Although no program has been
chosen, Rosen intends to produce
plays for children with both chil-
dren and adults in the cast. The
first production, possibly a musical
version of Dickens' "Christmas
Carol," is scheduled for the Christ-
mas season. A variety of the Sat-
urday matinee presentations are
planned for the spring.
Other performances to be in-
cluded in the regular Arts Theater
season include: "Cross Purpose"
by Albert Camus; "Colonel Woth-
erspoon" by James Bridie; W. B.
Yeats' "The Only Jealousy of El-
mer"; and "Exiles" by James
Joyce.
Memberships for the regular fall
series are on sale at the theater,

Wahr's,
Center.

Bob Marshall's,

Musicl

DAILY
OFFICIAL ,
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday).
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1952
VOL. LXIII, No. 9
Notices
Regent's Meeting. Friday, October 24,
at 2:00 p.m. Communications for con-
sideration at this meeting must be in
the President's hands not later than
October 16.
Secretary of the University
-Herbert G. Waltkins,
Disciplinary actions in care of stu-
dent misconduct: From February 11,
1952, to May 19, 1952, 102 students were
heard by the. Joint Judiciary Council.

In 37 of these cases the Council found
no violation, and these findings were
approved by the Suv-Committee on
Discipline. In the remaining cases the
following disciplinary a ction recom-
mended by the Joint Judiciary Council
were ordered by the Sub-Committee on
Discipline:
For Contributing to the Delinquency
of a minor
1) By providing liquor: 3 students
fined $10 and warned; 1 student fined
$25 and warned; 1 student fined $20 and
warned; 1 student warned.
2) By furnishing identification: 2 stu-
dents warned after paying Municipal
Court fine of $54.30.
3) By organizing party at which liquor
was served to minors: 1 student fined
$25 and warned.
4) And drinking in student quarters:
1 student fined $25 and w'rned: 1 stu-
dent fined $15 and warned.
For Use of Other's Identification in
Attempt to Purchase Intoxicants: 4 stu-
dents warned after paying Municipal
Court fine of $54.30; 1 student fined $10
and warned.
For Use of Falsified Identification in
Attempt to Purchase Intoxicants: 2 stu-
dents warned after paying Municipal
Court fine of $54.30; 1 student fined $25
and warned.
For Drinking in Student Quarters: 5
students fined $10 and warned; 3 stu-
dents (women) placed on social proba-
tion for 1 week; 2 students (women)
placed on social probation for 5 week-
ends; 1 student fined $20 and warned,
1 student warned.
For Falsifying University Records: 1
student fined $15 and warned; 1 student
fined $10 and warned.
For Theft from the Library: 1 student
fined $25 and warned.
For Auto Violations (special and ex-
traordinary cases): 2 students fined $20
and warned; 1 student fined $35, denied
future permit, and warned of immediate
suspension; 1 student fined $25 and
warned of immediate suspension; I stu-
dent placed on probation and warned
after paying Municipal Court fine of
$31.85.
For Driving While Intoxicated: 1 stu-
dent placed on probation and warned
after paying Municipal Court fine of
$108.85.
For Illegally Acquiring Duplicate
Football Tickets: 1 student required to
reimburse Athletic Association $21.60,
fined $25, and warned; 3 students re-
quired to reimburse Athletic Associa-
tion $21.60 and to submit to a course
of counseling by Joint Judiciary Coun-
cil, and warned.
Two group cases were heard and
judged to constitute no violation.
Fines were levied by the council in
the Men's Residence Halls and approved
by the Joint Judiciary Council as fol-
lows:
For Drinking in the Residence Halls:
19 students fined $10; 4 students fined
$15; and 2 students fined $25.
For Disturbing the Peace: 2 students
fined $25.
-Sub-Committee on Discipline
Extra Series Ushers. The following
ushers may pick up their cards at Hill
Auditorium Monday between 5 and 6
p.m.:
Helen Alan, Joseph Allerdice, William
Anderson, Kala Aronoff, Russel Bailey,
Ann Barto, Frank Beattie, Alan Berson,
Irma Bradley, Richard Branch, Javier
Bray, Anna Breyfogle, Glenna Burkitt,
Edward Burrows, David Carpenter,
B. Chan, Lee Copple, Barbara Crane,
Erminie Crockett, Donald Crowe, Mar-
lin Demlinger, P. E. DenJanosi, Jane
Ditto, Dan Dow, Carole Du Mahant,
Alice Faily, Marjorie Fairman, Barbara
Fischer, Joyce Fickies, Lois Fineman,
Marlene Fisher, Lily Fox, Marjorie
Franck, Gloria Friedland, Ted Fried-
man, Joseph Gadon, James Gielow,
Faith Gillespie, Marcia Goldfarb, Vir-
ginia Granse, Gloria Grisby, Laura Gut-
tentag,
Judy Hagen, Betty Hagle, Judy Has-
well, Martha Heller, Betty Hess, Kath-
ryn Hettinger, Barbara Hoefeld, Harold
Holt, Bebe Horuchi, Joan Hyman, Doris
Hyman, Sherman Itlaner,
Marvin Jacobs, Rosemary Jacobson,
Herbert Jennings, Judith Jorstad, Ron-
ald Karp, Mary Kemp, Elsie Kuhl, James
Labes, Shirlry Lapinsky, Jeanette Levy,
Rae Livingston, Janet Love,
Peter Lucas, George Mack, Jim Mag-
ary, Joan Malamud, Patricia Mallett,
J. Mandelstamm, M. C. Maselis, Barbara
Mattison, John McCreary,Mary McKin-
ney, Jo Anne Mendlow, Wanda Mi-
chaels, John Mills, Gloria Molnar, John
Munn, Necia Musser, Pat Newell, Allen
Norris, Norma Ockree, Pat Olsen, Ar-
lene Osberg,
Mary Jo Park, Elaine Pearlman, Betty
Pierce, Shirley Powell, Jane Prashker,
Gloria Rauche, David Reitz, Frances
Reitz, Marlene Rothenberg, Herbert Ru-
ben, Kathleen Ryska,
L. Brian Sanford, Doris Schweikert,

Maura Silverman, Elise Simon, Vera Si- i
men, Judith Smale, Mattie Snyder,
Richard Stableford, Norma Stecker,1
Ruth Strauss, Diana Styler, Eleanor
Swope, Margaret Takagi, Margaret Ta-
kagi, Jessica Tanner, Martha Taughner,
George Turner,
Carol Van Asselt, Henry Van Dyke,
Thomas Victor, Isabella Waldie, Ann
Weaver, Gerald Wisniewski, Marian
Wolf, Mayer Zald.
Personnel Requests:
The Federal Security Agency, Public
Health Service, in, Washington, D.C.,
announces examination for appoint-
ment of Scientists (Psychologst) to
the Regular Corps of the United States
Public Health Service. Appointments
to be made are in the grades of As-
sistant Scientist (equivalent to Navy
rank of Lieutenant, j.g.) and Senior As-
sistant Scientist (equivalent to Lieu-
tenant). The requirements for both
grades are U.S. citizenship are at least
21 years of age. Applications must be
in not later than October 21, 1952.
The Home State Life Insurance Com-
pany of Oklahoma City, Okla., is in
search of an individual for their actu-
ary department. A person graduating in
February is eligible to apply for the
opening.
Personnel Interviews
The American Airlines in Chicago is
now interviewing women interested in
becoming stewardesses. This program
will be continued through the spring
of 1953, therefore both February and
June women are eligible to apply. Any-
one interested is cordially, invited to
the offices in Chicago. ,
Further details, applications, and ap-
pointments are available at the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Administration
Building, Ext. 371.
Student sponsored social events list-
ed below are approved for the coming
week-end. Social chairmen are remind
ed that requests for approval for so-
cial events are due in the Office of Stu-
dents Affairs not later than 12 o'clock
noon on the Monday prior to the
events.
October 3
Martha Cook
Osterweil Coop House
Phi Delta Phi
Stockwell Hall
October 4
Alpha Delta Phi
Chi Phi
Cooley House
Delta Tau Delta
Gamma Phi Beta
Kappa Sigma
Lambda Chi Alpha
Phi Delta Phi
Phi Delta Theta
Reeves House
Sigma Nu
Theta Delta Chi
Tyler House
Victor Vaughan House
Delta Sigma Delta
Nu Sigma Nu
October 5
Phi Delta Phi
Elliott League House
Lectures
Freshman Health Lectures for Wom-
en will be given two semesters. Wom-
en students whose last names begin
with the letters A to L will attend
these lectures in the first semester be-
ginning Mon., Oct. 6. There will be two
sections scheduled as follows:
Section I-A through C, 4 p.m., Nat-
ural Science Auditorium.
Section II-D through L, 7:30 p.m.,
Natural Science Auditorium.
The women in the Freshman class
whose last names begin with the let-
ters Mc through Z will be scheduled for
the health lectures in the second se-
mester. Information about these lec-
tures will be announced later.
Academic Notices
To All Students, College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: No courses may
be added to your original elections aft-
er Fri., Oct. 3.
Preliminary Ph.D. Examinations in
Economics. Theory examinations will
be given on Thurs. and Fri., Oct. 30 and
31. The examinations in other subjects
will be given on Mon.,. Tues., and Wed.,
Nov. 3, 4 and 5. Each student plan-
ning to take these examinations should
leave with the Secretary of the Depart-
ment not later than Wed., Oct. 8, his
name, the three fields in which he de-
sires to be examined, and his field of
specialization.
Doctoral Examination for James Er-
nest Boggs, Chemistry; thesis: The Kin-

etics of the Exchange of Isotopic Chlo-
rine between Hydrogen Chloride and
Methyl Chloride, Monofluoro-Difluoro-,
and Trifluoro-Methyl Chlorides,"
Thurs., Oct. 2, 3003 Chemistry Bldg.,
1:30 p.m. Chairman, L. O. Brockway.
Seminar in Applied Mathematics.
First meeting Thurs., Oct. 2, 4 p.m.,
247 West Engineering, Building. Prof.
R. C. F. Bartels will speak on "The
Ship-Wave Problem."
Sociology 51. Mr. Greenblatt will not
meet his sections on Wed., Oct. 1, and
Thurs. Oct. 2.
Course 401, Interdisciplinary Seminar
on the Application of Mathematics to
the Social Sciences, will meet on Thurs.,
Oct. 2, 3409 Mason Hall, 4 p.m. Prof. C.
H. Coombs of the Psychology Depart-
ment will speak on "Decision Making
Under Uncertainty-Methodology."
The University Extension Service an-
nounces that registration is still open in
the following courses offered on Thurs-
day evening in the program for adults.
Enrollment may be made in Room 165,
School of Business Administration, be-
tween 6:30 and 9:45 p.m. through Thurs-
day of this week.
Astronomy for the Layman, Lantern
slides, demonstrations with the plane-
tarium, telescopic observations, and
identification of constellations from
the sky will supplement the lectures,
which are designed for those who wish
a general knowledge of the constella-
tions. Instructor, Prof. Hazel M. Losh.
7:30 p.m., 2003 Angell Hall. Eight weeks,
$6.
Creative Artists at Work. This new
course, designed to acquaint interested
persons with the nature and meaning
of art in our time, is a series of lectures
and demonstrations by faculty members
known for proficiency in one or anoth-
er of the creative fields. Every effort
will be made to explain, in simple
terms ,what purpose lies behind an art-
ist's work, how he selets his materials,
and' the way in which he arranges or
composes them to achieve the effects
he wishes to express. Lecturers (in the
order of their appearance) are Charles
L. Stevenson, Donald B. Gooch, Walter
W. J. Gores, Jean Paul Slusser, Ross
Lee Finney, Gilbert Ross, Claribel
Baird, James R. Squires, and Oliver A.
Edel. Prof. Stevenson will moderate the
concluding panel discussion. 7:45 p.m.,
beginning Oct. 2. Auditorium B, Angell
Hall. Ten weeks, $10. (Registration may
be made at the classroom in the half-
hour period preceding tonight's lec-
ture.)
Design Principles in the Home. Of-
fered for those interested in the de-
sign and organization of the modern
home. Includes assigned elementary
problems illustrating basic principles of
line, space, color, texture, and form
that can be applied to home design
and decoration. Instructor, Prof. Her-
bert W. Johe. 7:30 p.m., 346 Archi-
tecture Building. Sixteen weeks, $18.
Faster Reading. This course is for
those who wish to increase their ability
to read faster with better comprehen-
sion. Selected printed passages are used
as well as comprehensive checks on all
reading passages; also Harvard reading
film and the tachistoscope. Enrollment
is NOT open to University students ex-
cept by special permission from the Ex-
tension Service. Prof. W. Robert Dixon
is the instrctor. 7:30 p.m., beginning
Oct. 2, 131 School of Business Adminis-
tration. Eight weeks, $5.
Freehand Drawing. Open to those in-
terested in doing creative work in free-
hand drawing, using still life, model, or
freely chosen subject matter. Beginners
as well as mature students may enroll.
Instructor, Prof. Gerome Kamrowski.
7:30 p.m., 415 Architecture Building.
Sixteen weeks, $18.
Practical Public Speaking (Speech 31,
two hours credit). Planned to meet the
need of those interested in the acquisi-
tion of proficiency in extemporaneous
speaking. May be elected without cred-
it if desired. Instructor, Paul E. Cairns,
7:30 p.m., 4203 Angell Hall. Sixteen
weeks, $18.
Events Today
Literary College Conference. Steering
committee meeting, 4 p.m., 1011 Angell
Hall.^,
Weekly graduate record concert will
be held in the East Lounge of Rack-
ham at 7:45 p.m. Program: Mozart,
Quintet in g minor (Budapest); Stra-
vinsky, Petrouchka; and Beethoven,
Concerto in D Major for Violin (Hei-
fitz). All graduates are cordially invit-
ed.
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1,34 1,96
3 ,70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-University High School ring, gold
with green stone. R. Torres engraved
under tape on the bottom. At 4712
South Quad, Ext. 247 Taylor House.
)3L
LOST-A.T.O. pin with initials P.D.K.
Saturday. Ph. 2-6015. )4L
LOST-Black key case, vicinity Maynard
and Williams. Ph. 3-1511, Ext. 2848.
Mrs. Hellenga. )5L
GOLD LADY ELGIN watch, Sept. 16 be-
tween Hallers Jewelers and Alexander's
Drug Store. Phone 3533 Stockwell. )6L
LOST-Straw wallet between League and
Angell Hall around noon on Oct. 1.
Contains valuable papers. Reward:-
Call Betty Givens, phone 8607. )7L
FOR SALE
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models;
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
MODERN PINBALL MACHINE. Will sell
only for fraternal or personal use.
$25. Phone 29490.
UPRIGHT FISCHER PIANO-Make us
an offer. Call 9783 after 5:30 P.M. )22
TWO SCHWINN bicycles, good condi-
tion, gear shifts, hand brakes. Wayne,
2556W. )24
UNDERWOOD portable typewriter in
good condition. Phone 2-2377 between
1-3 p.m. or evenings. )25
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOOTBALL weekend guest rooms avail-
able. Student Room Bureau. Phone
Don Tewes, 3-8454 8 a.m.-11 p.m. )3R
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R
COMFORTABLE SUITE for two men.
Prefer graduate students. Call after
5:30 at 1402 Hill. )10R
Ending Friday

ROOMS FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM-Hollywood bed, maid
service, hot plate privileges, refrigera-
tor privileges, modern bathroom facili-
ties, near campus. Call 2-7108 and ask
for John Black. )8R
FOR RENT-10 rooms unfurnished ex-
cept for stove and refrigerator. Im-
mediate occupance. Campus loeation.
$125 per month plus heat and utilities.
Phone Mr. Hansen at 3-1511, ext. 311.
)9R
PERSONAL
KEEPSAKE, REWARD-Will person who
bought 1921 silver dollar, with initial
"E" on face, from State Street bank,
phone 2-2982.
ROOM-MATE TO SHARE a three-room
furnished ap't with young woman
teacher. Ph. 20879,
VOICE and Speech Lessons-Kenneth N.
Westerman S.C.D. Member National
Association Teachers of Singing. Stu-
dio 303 S. State. Phone 6584. )8P
SORRY that our line was busy when you
phoned but scads of students have
been ordering mags at our cheaper-
than-newspaper-prices. Why not call.
again today for Time, Life, Colliers,
Sat. Eve. Post, etc., at stupendous
student savings? Student 'Periodical,
6007. )9P
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED to Alma or Mt. Pleasant
this weekend. Will share expenses.
Phone 5284. ) 5T
HELP WANTED
STUDENT'S WIFE or Coed to work in
coffee shop for part time. Hours 7:30
until 9:30 mornings. Monday through
Saturday. Ph. 5464 or 6087.
STUDENT TO FIRE BOILERS. Experi-
ence preferred but not necessary.
Hours 5-7 p.m. Monday thru Saturday,
and all day Sunday. Call in person
at Neilson's Greenhouses-1019 Maiden
Lane.
PART TIME store clerk for men's wear
and shoe store. Experience preferred.
Good wages. Inquire in person. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. )4H
NEED 3 or 4 apple pickers after or be-
tween classes. Experience preferred.
Phone Whitmore Lake 5601, John
Mitacek, 9385 Spencer Rd. )7H

I.'.EII*FI*D

HELP WANTED
SALESPEOPLE-To demonstrate and sell
the Babyhood Wonda Chair. Not sold
in stores. It's a hi chair, youth chair,
table & chair set, car seat, and stroller.
All in one low price combination. No
canvassing-continuous leads provid-
ed High commission. Car needed.
Opportunity. For interview write Mr.
Lowery, Mich. Daily. )15H
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet weshing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
GOOD Rental Typewriters available at
reasonable rates. Office Equipment
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Phone'2-1213.
)4B
WANTED TO RENT
ONE CAR GARAGE wanted, preferably
near Hill and State. Call 3-4187. )1W
MISCELLANEOUS
PLAYTIME CARE OF CHILDREN
In my home. Educational toys, play-
ground equipment. Sat. also. Phone
3-1037. )1M
IF YOU HAVE 3 or more members in
your family and would like to save
up to $350.00 per year on food, call
Mr. Stern, 2-0720 daily 3-5, 6-9. )8M

READ
and
USE
Daily
Classifieds

* I
4'

MALE STUDENT-Fairly husky for work
in Lithographic Shop. Should have
approximately half days available.
Some experience would be helpful.
Call. 3-0591 for interview. )13H
PART TIME HELP for fountain and
waiter, evenings. Wolverine Den, 1311
S. University. )16H

t'

What do lovers on the moon
use for moonlight?
We are not prepared to answer that question, but we can tell
you what Hollywood is using to make good movies-clever.
entertaining ideas.
There is an excellent example on its way. . . M-G-M's.
"Fearless Fagan." This is a picture which won't bring you a
cast of thousands or even a set of big stars. It just happens
to be a great piece of moviemaking-the kind of fun-film you
might miss if we didn't take this means of telling you about
its warmth and charm and hilarity.
"Fearless Fagan" presents some pleasant young people-
Carleton Carpenter and Janet Leigh-and a story about a kid
who gets caught in the draft and takes his lion to camp with
him. Sounds crazy, but it really happened.
M-G-M presents
FEARLESS FAGAN

This Magnum of French Champagne ends Thursday.
ROUND OF LOVE
.,DELIGHTFUL THE PICTURE- Of TE TEAR
MLET LY CHARMaG tM 3heNE
Ph. 5651
Friday - HELEN HAYES in "MY SON JOHN"
1

NOW1
Marilyn Monroe
makes

Cineoa SL quild
FRIDAY - SATURDAY- SUNDAY

Also

"FOOLISH
DUCKLING"4
Cartoon

NEWS
NOVELTY

STARTS TODAY
thru Saturday
Disnys
STORYO
TECHNICOLOR
RICHARD TODD
r Wi. JOAN RICE
PLUS
drama of
primitive
love ...
;N filmed in
~2~/EXCffING
COLOR!
ulo~I

SATURDAY
The Comedy Hit of 1952
"FEARLESS
FAGAN"

Coming
ANN AR
Watch fa

(Truth is funnier than fiction)
to
BOR
or itI
A. Kraft

Continuous Performance
Friday and Saturday
from 5:30 P.M.
Last complete show both nights - 9:45
Sunday - one show only - 8:30 P.M.

L 7

.

ir* i r i

I

Celia
JOHNSON

Trevor
HOWARD

Stanley
HOLLOWAY

0

in NOEL COWARD'S
"BRIEF ENCOUNTER"
A J. Arthur Rank Production
Shown at 5:30, 7:55, 10:15
"Excellent . . . tender, touching , . . a delicate delight in'that it deals
with lifelike if not hallowed human experiences."-THE NEW YORKER
"Deeply touching . . . a pleasure to watch."-THE NATION
"Filmed with disturbing realism . . ."-TIME
"Designed to appeal to that group of film-goers who are provoked by
the usual movie tripe . . , Uncommonly good."-THE NEW YORK
TIMES.
also
THE JOHN GRIERSON DOCUMENTARY
I _10 A -% ANO - WW/ _A\ k

Announcing...
GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY'S
1952-53 SEASON
"FILMS OF OUTSTANDING DIRECTORS"
OCT. 13-William Wellman's "OX-BOW INCI- FEB. 23-G. W. Pabst's ''THE JOYLESS STREET"
DENT" with Henry Fonda, one of the finest West- with Greta Garbo, her most distinguished European
picture.
erns made.
MAR. 9-Sergei Eisenstein's "BATTLESHIP PO-
NOV. 3-D. W. Griffith's "BIRTH OF A NATION" TEMKIN" recently voted the best picture of all
t a Cl f i.time; and Frank Capra's "THE BATTLE OF RUS-
the famous Civil War film; a pioneer. SIA" from the wartime documentary "Why We
NOV. 24--Rene Clair's "LE MILLION" a French Fight" series.
comedy of the freshest invention, MAR. 30-Lewis Milestone's "ALL QUIET ON
THE WESTERN FRONT" with Lew Ayres; the
DEC. 8-Fritz Lang's "M" with Peter Lorre; the World War I classic.
original psychological drama. APR. 27 - Josef von Sternberg's "MOROCCO"
with Marlene Dietrich and Gary Cooper.
JAN. 12-Eric von Stroheim's "GREED" with Zasu MAY 11-King Vidor's "HALLELUJAH" experi-
Pitts; a milestone in the silent film. mental sound film with oll-Negro cast.

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan