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September 28, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-28

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28; 1952.

PAGE THREE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THIS I BELIEVE':
SRA Announces Speaker
Schedule for Fall Series

Marching Maize and Blue

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Alabama Bars Two Negro Women;
Illinois Cancer Drug Study Pending

Speakers for the Student Reli-
gious. Association's fall Lecture
Series entitled "This I Believe"
were announced by Lane Hall of-
ficials yesterday.
The series will be opened on+
Oct. 28 by Ashley Montague, Chair-
man of the Rutgers University An-1
thropology Department and UNE-
SCO consultant. Montague, who is]
' also writer, producer and director
of the film "One World or None"+
will speak on "Man and His Uni-
verse."
The following week, "Ethical
Problems in Public Life," will be
discussed by George N. Shuster.
President of Hunter College in
New York and former Governor
General of occupied Bavaria.
Shuster is also editor of the
Catholic magazine Commonweal.
"A Foreign Policy for Peace"
will be the subject of a talk by

Vera Micheles Dean who will speak
on Nov. 11. Mrs. Dean, who is Re-
search Director of the Foreign Pol-
icy Association and editor of the
organizations publications, is also
a well known lecturer who has
spoken from platforms all over
the world.
The Very Reverend James A.
Pike, Dean of the Cathedral of
St. John in New York and former
Chaplin of Columbia University,
will end the series with a discus-
sion of the "Individual and His
Faith" on November 18.
The series is a revision of Reli-
gion in life month which has been
sponsored by Lane Hall in pre-
vious years. According to Grey
Austin, Program Assistant of SRA
the change was made because the
emphasis this year is not strictly
on Religion, and several of the
speakers are not connected with
any church.

By JAN WINN
The University of Alabama may
have to face a court battle over its
refusal to admit two Negro wo-
men to its school of post graduate
studies.
The women, both June gradu-
ates of Miles Memorial College in
Birmingham, were told by the
dean that Alabama laws prevent-
ed their enrollment at the Uni-
versity.
A Birmingham lawyer, Arthur
Shores is preparing to appeal
directly to University president
John Gallalee. Shores stated
that if Gallalee will not admit
the two, he will file a suit In

Federal Court in Birmingham
on the grounds that the Uni-
versity's refusal violates consti-
tutional rights.
T h e Crimson-White, school
newspaper, in an editorial at-
tacking impending court action,
stated:
. . Thinking Southerners,
thank God, realize that big prob-
lems can't be solved by new legis-
lation and force. The mighty sweep
of court injunction does not make
the two parties involved happier."
The editorial continues: ". . .
we maintain that there is no race
hatred among the vast majority
of Southerners. Certainly we se-

gregate our schools, busses, and so-
cial meeting places. It's only good
sense . . . segregation does not
meanthat we Southerners hate
Negroes. It means that we realize
we are different in our ways and'
habits in general."
UNIVERSITY of Illinois trus-
tees are demanding the formula
of Krebiozen, before allowing
study of the controversial 'cancer
drug' to continue at the Univer-
sity.
A committee, appointed to study
the drug stated that they found
"no acceptable evidence that any
malignent tumor has been cured
by Krebiozin.

CORRECTION

-Daily-Don Campbell
MICHIGAN TAKES THE FIELD -The band is waiting to go into one of their political formations
which highlighted halftime ceremonies yesterday.
Student Interest Backs SL, Poll States

Many people think that Ulrich's

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Book

Store carries only ENGINEERING books
. . . Ulrich's carry a very huge stock of
used and new books for every course onf
the Michigan campus.

4

Michigan Bell Welcomes
FORMER OPERATORS
to Ann Arbor
We have immediate openings for those student wives
who have had some telephone operating experience.
If you are one of these girls, drop in to see our em-
ployment representative. Ann Arbor has a fine group
of girls and a very attractive building which is located
only 212 blocks from the campus.
Visit us at:
Michigan Bell Telephone Co.
323 E. Washington St.

By VIRGINIA VOSS
Backing the Student Legislature
as it begins its seventh year of
operation on campus is a wide-
spread student interest in the gov-
erning body's activities reported in
a recent representative survey.
The poll revealed that SL, whose
chief function was once taken care
of under a group known as the
Gripes Committee, is now firmly
established in students' minds as
a full-fledged legislative body.
BUT OTHER factors not so en-
couraging to SL members were al-
so pointed up in the 300-student
survey. Psychology-sociology stu-
dents who took the poll in colla-
boration with theSurveyResearch
Center reported that the campus'
main idea of SL was a forum for
reflectingmopinion rather than a
decision-making body.
Questioned students indicated
further that they doubted the
representativeness of SL. Gener-
ally skeptical as to motives
which induce students to run on
the campus ticket, a majortiy of
those polled reported that "per-
sonal prestige" was the main
reason for seeking legislature
positions.
The source of the problem was
pointed up in reports indicating

that 40 per cent of students voted
for friends or "names they knew"
rather than platform issues.
Though student interest in
the six-year old governing body
was nearly universal, knowledge
of specific SL actions was sparse.
More than 20 per cent of those
questioned could not remember
anything SL had done.
Concerning SL influence on the
University administration and the
student body, the poll showed it
to be increasing but still not sig-
nificant.
VIEWED IN historical perspec-
tive, SL has come a long way in
building up student interest over
its six-year existence.
The now firmly resolved " ques-
tion of whether a representative
government would work on cam-
pus was in 1946 a highly debatable
issue.
In that year, interest in the
new group ran high, according
to former SL president Leonard
Wilcox, '55L. The veteran era
and the overcrowded campus it
brought with it necessitated an
organization to reflect student
opinions and provide services
for the University population.
But the biggest interest in SL
came from those who felt the gov-
erning body could without reserva-
tion cure all the campus' problems.
Consequently, SL soon found itself
mainly concerned with such mat-
ters as putting up convenient pen-
cil sharpeners and sponsoring pep
rallies.
In 1948 and 1949, apathetic
students complained of SL's
worthlessness and e I e c t i o n
frauds, and SL took to focusing
on specific issues to arouse more
sincere interest.
It greatly streamlined its own
HST Asks End
Of Aircraft Strike
WASHINGTON--P)-President
Truman yesterday called upon
both workers and management to
end the strike at the Douglas and
Lockheed aircraft plants in Cali-
fornia in the interest of national
defense.
The White House disclosed that
the President had sent a telegram
to the heads of both aircraft com-
panies and the union officials in-
volved.

organization and in 1949 and 1950
it began to.emphasize safeguard-
ing students rights. Action in these
years and those that followed re-
vived interest, as the survey indi-
cated. Though skepticism on some
phases of SL action is widespread,
practically no one today would
brand it a "worthless" organiza-
tion.
Engiiieers Get
Special Guided
MVissileWork
Seven University students, en-
gineering trainees, are now par-
ticipating in the White Sands
Proving Ground Cooperative Stu-
dent Training Program where they
are receiving practical training in
guided misile research.
The project at the rocket base
in New Mexico will take six
months. Then the group, all so-
phomores, will return to the Uni-
versity in time to register for sec-
ond semester in the College of
Engineering. The group will re-
turn to White Sands each ensuing
year until they have finished the
complete training program.
Four of the students have been
assigned to the Flight Determina-
tion Laboratory, and the rest to
the Systems Test. Division.
The Michigan students include
James Ford, vice president of Phi
Eta Sigma and holder of a varsity
letter in swimming, Dale Ray, who
is attending the University on a
scholarship, Robert Kovacs, high
school salutatorian, and Gerald
Harju.
Also included were Thomas
Wayburn, John Shields, and Paul
Szyperski.

For all campus occasions . .
one of our Moordale collection
of imported tweed suits. Colors
include shrimap, blue, f ushia,
and copper. junior sizes.
49.95
MAIN AT LIIERTY ANN Aiioa

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