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September 27, 1952 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1952-09-27

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I

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

!M"-

SPORTS SLANTS
... By EdWhipple

M'Opens

Grid Season Against iSC

ROLLING IN THE GUTTER is not a desirable pastime, but some-
times in dealing with certain types of individuals and their ideas
the gutter is the only place to do business.
A healthy football rivalry between Michigan and Michigan State
is being jeopardized by over-ambition and misrepresentation. The
latest is an article in the October 7 issue of "Look" magazine (on
newsstands now) by Tim Cohane that purports to give the scoop on
"The Michigan State of Affairs." It is nothing more than a misleading
glorification of Michigan State at the expense of the University of
Michigan.
Michigan officials, pursuing their policy customary in such
matters, refuse to even so much as comment on Cohane's remarks.
They say, in effect, that nothing can be gained by "rolling in the
gutter" with those who call names, and write sarcasm and in-
nuendo. Their position is understandable, and obviously best for
the University in the long run.
But meanwhile, Cohane's cohorts and Michigan State drag the
Maize and Blue through the mud while joining the latest fad, spreading
the Gospel of the Green and White. From his ivory tower in New
York Cohane writes:
"In exuding intercollegiate rectitude, athletic director (H. O.)
Crisler and Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, faculty representative to the Con-
ference, would find halos somewhat superfluous. They have sold
Michigan football as pristine, well-scrubbed and godly. They have
suggested that the shape of Walter Camp, who invented football at
Yale in 1882, appeared to "Hurry Up" Yost at Ferry Field one gloam-
ing and turned over the keys to the kingdom.
'The Divine Paradox'...
THEY HAVE dogmatized 'The Divine Paradox' which teaches that
Western Conference football is at once invincible and chaste. As
for Michigan, she did not recruit her champions. They sprang, full
panoplied for the kickoff, from the brow of Michigan's Jupiter."
By contrast, "MSC's advent (into the Conference) was
engineered by her president, 50-year-old Dr. John Alfred Hannah.
Dr. Hannah is an outstanding educator. In eleven years he has
increased the curriculum, built up the campus, and doubled en-
rollment to over 13,000." (My, my) "He is also sports knowing."
And so on, ad nauseum, how the poor little Spartans fought an
uphill battle, unwanted by most member schools, until they finally
were admitted to the Big Ten, "the ranks of the seraphim," as
Cohane calls it.
It might be added, that since their entry into the Conference,
the Spartans have done nothing to endear themselves to its members.
They have snarled the schedule meetings into a deadlock, aroused
several sections of the country with recruiting tactics that at best are
ruthless, and made themselves generally obnoxious with sobs and
moans over such things as athletic scholarships and bowl games.
By Another Name...
YET COHANE MANAGES to palm off as "practicalism" what is
hypocrisy by any standards: "The athletic scholarship is pre-
ferred by Dr. Hannah," but "Joining the Conference forced MSC to
forego protestingly her open athletic scholarships. He is also a prac-
ticalist. He came out against Bowl games early this year, yet he had
sought Conference permission for MSC's '50 team to play in the
Cotton Bowl and got slapped down." Meanwhile, the MSC financial
mill continues to grind, and out of it all comes something more than
feed for the livestock behind Shaw Hall.
The Conference is "gumshoeing the (Jerry) Musetti case,"
according to Cohane, and "It will come up for Conference decision
in December." The Musetti case was supposed to have been con-
sidered by the Conference meeting in May but no report was ever
made public, and there is no reason to expect anything in Decem-
ber. Let's face it. The Spartans were just too sly even for the two
former FBI men doing the sleuthing. They did a good job of cover-
ing the dirty tracks they left on the way from Ann Arbor to East
Lansing with Musetti in tow.
But here's the real panic that should qualify for understatement
of the month: "Academically, MSC, like Michigan, will cut no corners
--not with Dr. Hannah running things. MSC has two recruiting ad-
vantages: a wider selectivity of undergraduate courses and the need
of only a high school diploma for admission."
* * * *
Variety's Virtue
WHY CUT CORNERS that are already so round there is no friction
even against the roughest material? Variety is a wonderful
thing, but its virtue is being tested sorely when "from Shrubbery
105" to "Cow Care 203" can be a cross-section of a college curriculum.
And so on. Cohane sits at his typewriter in New York and
professes to tell the nation what's going on here. His knowledge
of Michigan is reflected in his statement, "Sophomore (Duncan)
McDonald's passing key is Michigan's current hopes." Anyone who
so much as reads the newspapers knows that if McDonald sees any
action today, it will be as a substitute for Ted Topor at quarter-
back.
To Cohane and his kind, the obvious advice is this: If you've got
something on Michigan, let's have it. It's a simple case of put up or

shut up. And don't believe everything you hear.
The following came in the mail as the last paragraph of an
anonymous letter, but it hits the nail so squarely on the head it is
repeated here, for the benefit of those who have done such a mar-
velous job of propagandizing the nation with the glories of the Green
and White:
"As individuals and as an institution why not assure your proper
4 place and be content therein? It is so easy to confuse success with
greatness; they are not necessarily concomitants." This is truly "The
Michigan State of Affairs."
Michigan MSC Rivalry

Yankees Beat Athletics, 5-2;
Cop Fourth Straight Crown
Martin's Bases-loaded Single Wins Game;
Yanks To Meet Dodgers in Subway Series

Full House
To Witness
Annual Tilt
(Continued from Page 1)

NATIONAL GRID SCENE:
Major Elevens Open Campaigns Today

PHILADELPHIA--(P)-The New
York Yankees clinched their
fourth consecutive American Lea-
gue Pennant yesterday when Billy
Martin cracked a two-out bases
loaded single in the top of the
11th inning to drive in two mates
and pave the way for a 5-2 tri-
umph over the fighting Philadel-
phia Athletics.
Johnny Sain, 34-year-old right-
hander, who pitched the Boston
Braves to a National League pen-
nant in 1948, was the winning
pitcher, hurling two and one third
innings of scoreless relief after
squelching a Philadelphia threat
in the bottom of the ninth. Harry
Byrd brilliant rookie righthand-
er, who went all the way for the
A's was charged with the defeat.
* * *
THE VICTORY gave Manager
Casey Stengel of the Yankees the
distinction of leading a team to
- *

fielding support by his team-
mates.
In the fatal 11th, Mantle led off
with a hard ground single past
Ferris Fain. Yogi Berra forced
Mantle at second. Joe Collins
chopped a single to short for his
fourth hit of the game, Berra
moving to second. Byrd's first
pitch to Hank Bauer hit him on
the left thigh to load the bases.
Stengel summoned Woodling to
bat for Jim Brideweser, who had
replaced Phil Rizzuto at short in
the 10th. Byrd disposed of the
pinch hitter on a popup to short
for the second out. With a 1-2
count on Martin, Byrd tried to
sneak a fast inside pitch by the
batter, but Billy picked the ball
practically off his left ear and
smashed it into left field for a
clean hit, scoring Berra and Col-
lins to snap the 2-2 tie.
Wolverines
Show Spirit
In Last Drill
The Wolverine football team,
sporting their spanking new Maize
and Blue uniforms took a brief
workout yesterday under the
watchful eyes of Coach Bennie
Oosterbaan and his staff.
The team showed lots of spirit
as it ran through signal drills and
loosened its muscles in prepara-
tion for the big intra-state game
today at Michigan Stadium.
MEANWHILE, up at the Mich-
igan Stadium, Biggie Munn sent
his Green and White clad charges
through their paces in a secret
practice session. The Spartans had
left Lansing at noon to get in a
brief workout session in the Sta-
dium before the game today.
Munn wanted to give his team,
especially the first-year men a
chance to get used to the mam-
moth 97,000 stadium so they
wouldn't be overly impressed by
its vastness and forget what
they learned about football.
Directly after the light work-
out, the MSC squad left Ann Ar-
bor by bus and went to Jackson
where it spent the night. Appar-
ently Munn felt that Ann Arbor
would be just a little too noisy on
the eve of the big game for his
charges to get much sleep.
In case anyone has ideas of
buying tickets for the game at
the gate, he might as well cast
his allusions away for every
ticket in the house is sold out.
The press box will be filled to
capacity, with many out of state
reporters covering what many
consider to be the "game-of-the-
day."
Bill Stern, famed N a t i o n a l
Broadcasting Company Sports
Director will be one of the an-
nouncers calling the play by play
from the Stadium. Stern was
down at Ferry Field yesterday
watching the Wolverines go
through their paces.

SOLE NEWCOMER to the Spar-
tan defensive team is sophomore
Henry Bullough (202).
Punting chores will be handled
by Michigan's Bill Billings and
MSC's Yewcic.
The Wolverines will likely rely
mainly on their standard single
wing attack, with some use of
the double wing and the 'T'.
What with acepasser Duncan
McDonald on tap, Oosterbaan
will undoubtedly exploit this
mode of attack.
Operating from all three for-
mations, MSC probably will accent
the running game which features
halfbacks McAuliffe and Pisano.
However both Yewcic and Willie
Thrower are better than average
heavers and, should the Maize and
Blue defense present too difficult
a front, the Spartans - may well
take to the air.
MSC FOOTBALL history ad-
mits the possibility of an upset by
the revengeful Wolverines. Only
once before in the series dating
back to 1898 have the Spartans
managed to win three in a row
from the "Champions of the
West."
For the second time in history,
Michigan will have a chance to
blast her country cousins' '15-
game win streak. Never before
has Michigan State won more
in a row. Just 37 years ago an
aroused Wolverine eleven smash-
ed a similar record of the then
Michigan Aggies.
Spartan mentor Biggie Munn
and Oosterbaan have opposed one
another four times. The record
now stands 2-2, Bennie's Wolver-
ines walking off with victories in
1948 and '49, with State winning
in 1950 and '51.

NEW YORK- (M)-California,
already picked by the ballot-
ers as one of the 'Rose Bowl
contestants, runs up against Mis-
souri today, an opponent which
came within minutes of scoring a
major upset last week.
Princeton, professor of the
longest current winning streak in
football, goes on television with
Columbia to show the sit-at-
homes how it was done.
* * * ~
AND THE principal proponents
of unrestricted football television,
Pennsylvania and Notre Dame,
already have stirred up a front-
office rhubarb that likely will be
rougher and last longer than their
struggle on the gridiron.
All that adds up to a red-hot
football Saturday today without
making allowances for Septem-
ber weather.
Although such staid circuits as
the Ivy League and Big Ten are
getting into general action for the
first time this season, they've al-
ready taken the front and center
spots for this week-end.

The game itself figures to be
a bruising affair, somewhat
closer than the run-of-the-mill
season openers, with Notre
Dame a slight favorite.
California, led by rugged John-
ny Olszewski, shapes up as a much
more powerful team than Mis-
souri, but so did Maryland last
week. And Maryland, ranked sec-
ond in a pre-season polls, had to
overcome a ten-point deficit to
win 13-10.
* * *
INTERSECTIONAL struggles,
such as this, highlight the entire
program tomorrow with the west
coast offering some of the best. In
addition to Missouri-California,
there are Texas Christian, defend-
ing Southwest Conference Cham-
pion, against highly - regarded
UCLA. Minnesota at Washington
and Nebraska at Oregon. The only
Pacific Coast Conference game is
Stanford at Washington State.
Moving eastward, the big in-
tersectional clashes include San-
ta Clara at Kansas, Texas at

North Carolina, Villanova at
Clemson, Iowa at Pittsburgh,
Purdue ataPenn State and South
Carolina at Army.
Along strictly sectional confer-
ence lines are such standout tus-
sles as Holy Cross-Dartmouth, Col-
gate-Cornell and Yale-Navy in the
east; Florida-Georgia Tech, Geor-
gia - Tulane, Alabama - Louisiana
State, Maryland-Auburn, Missis-
sippi-Kentucky, Mississippi State-
Tennessee and Wake Forest-Wil-
liam and Mary in the south.
There's Indiana-Ohio ' State,
Iowa State-Illinois, Marquette-
Wisconsin and Kansas State-Cin-
cinnati in the midwest.
FOU OTBALL
DYNAMITE
IN
MICHIGAN
How has Michigan State's
football rise affected the
Wolverines . . traditional
Champions of the West?
How hot is competition
for players? What will
happen when these rivals
meet this Saturday? How
are our state loyalties di-
vided? Read "THE STATE
OF AFFAIRS IN MICHI-
GAN" in LOOK. On your
newstand today.

'I

12

CASEY STENGEL
... four for four
four straight pennants, previous-
ly accomplished only by Joe Mc-
Carthy and John McGraw.
It was the Yanks' sixth vic-
tory in a row and their 20th
in the last 24 games. The Yan-
kees now lead the second place
Cleveland by three full games.
Each team has two games left
to play. Should the Indians win
two and the Yankees lose their
two, the Yanks would still lead
by one game at the close of the
campaign.
Until Martin wrapped up the
Yankee victory with his decisive
single, all runs for both sides re-
sulted from home runs. Irv Noren,
subbing for the ailing Gene Wood-
ling, socked his fifth homer of the
season in the third. Mickey Mantle
the dynamic sophomore slugger,
rapped his 23rd round tripper in
the fourth. Big Gus Zernial homer-
ed for the A's. His blow, a tre-
mendous wallop that went over
the roof in left center field and
sailed clear out of the park, fol-
lowed a sixth inning single by
Dave Philley and tied the score
at 2-2.
MARTIN'S game-winning blow,
his first hit of the game, came at
a time when it seemed young Byrd
would pitch his way out of his
worst jam of the game. The 27-
year-old hurler had pitched bril-
liant ball for 10 innings, permit-
ting only four harmless singles, be-
sides the two round trippers.
In sharp contrast, southpaw
Eddie Lopat, was started for the
Yankees, who rocked for 11 safe-
ties in the 8% innings he work-
ed, but had stayed even with
Byrd because of some brialliant
Farm
Cupboard
Food You'll
P m inm nr

BE SURE TO

..'..,,,. ,tid r ,
. by .
\

Read and Use
Daily Classi fieds

FOR FUN AND
RELAXATION ..
Golwf Practice
Range
WE FURNISH CLUBS.
OPEN 3:00-11:00 P.M.
3 h miles east of Ann Arbor--
out Washtenaw and one mile
south on Milan Rd. (U.S.-23)
or out Packard Rd. to Milan Rd.
(U.S.-23).

There's something magnetic
about men who wear

Arrow White Shirts

To all loyal Michigan fans, who
revel in "the good old days" the
,Daily dedicates the following
scoreboard of the rivalry with
Michigan State.
With all of the dire predictions
of football experts it may be a
comforting thought to remember
that fifty years ago the Maize and
Blue rolled to a 119-0 win. How-
ever, that was fifty years ago.

1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
100

MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
mTrwH

39
55
21
3
17
0
0
26
20
0
6
7
14
14
n a

MSC0
MSC 0
MSC 3
MSC 0
MSC 0
MSC0
MSC 0
MSC 0
MSC 0
MSC 6
MSC 16
MSC 25
MSC 21
MSC 19
MSC 0
mr 11

1898
1902
1907
1908
1910

MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH.
MICH

39
119
46
0
6

MSC
MSC
MSC
MSC
MSC

0
0
0
0
a

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