100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 13, 1953 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


V, JANUARY 13, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

V

nion Plans
luebook Bal

I

Riots, Fires, Maniacs Provided Atmosphere
For Annual J-Hop Dances of Previous Years

For Saturday
Clare Shepard's Band,
Programs To Feature
Exam Season Dance
Presentipg the last dance of the
semester, the Union will offer stu-
dents the opportunity to forget
bluebook "blues" at the semi-
annual Bluebook Ball from 9 p.m.
to midnight Saturday in the Union
Ballroom.
The Bluebook Ball is becoming a
traditional dance at the Union and
is sponsored at the end of each
semester so that couples may have
one last fling before finals.
BLUEBOOKS will provide the
main theme for decorations at the
ball. A huge bluebook will be used
as a backdrop behind the band-
stand while smaller ones will be
hung on the walls of the ball-
room.
Programs in the shape of min-
iature bluebooks will be given
to each couple. On the programs
will be written typical comments
such as "B plus! I guess that
ruined your four point."
The programs will have blanks
inside that can be filled out so
that students can "rate their
dates."
* * *
IN THE HALLWAY outside the
ballroom there will be large black-
boards equipped with chalk and
erasers.
Industrious students will be
able to finish their last minute
calculations on these black-
boards. Others may perfect their
"doodling" in order to decorate
their bluebooks while writing
final exams.
Clare Shepard and the Union
band will provide the restful music
to help couples forget their final
exam "jitters."
Tickets for the dance are priced
at $1 per couple and can be pur-
chased at the, Union main desk
before the dance.
In spite of the numerous blue-
books of all sizes that will be
displayed at the dance, the at-
mosphere will be entirely non-
academic, promises the Union So-
cial Committee.

MARJORIE McLEAN

MARY JEAN FOLEY

ELEANOR LEAVESLEY

Couples dancing to the music
of Tommy Dorsey and Ralph Mar-
tie at the '53 J-Hop will be at-
tending an event with a 76-year
history filled with riots, fires and
raving maniacs.
The bizarre tale begins way back
on Feb. 17, 1877 when students
trouped down to Hank's Emporium
on South Main St. to attend the
first "Junior Hop."
IT WAS the big social event, of
the year, with an orchestra con-
sisting of two violins and a piano
providing the music for the 20
couples who attended the dance.
The juniors had won the hon-
or of presenting this first hop,
only after a long hard campus
fight.
During the next four years the
juniors continued to sponsor the
annual dance, but then, aban-
doned by this group, the Hop was
taken over by a group of frater-
nities, which promptly dubbed it
the "Society Hop."
CHANGING the name to 'Jun-
ior Social," the junior class came
back on the scene in 1883 to spon-
sor the event once again. How-
ever, the confusion was not en-
tirely cleared up, and for nearly
a decade after this, the dance was
given by thle juniors in some years
and by the fraternities in others.
By 1891, the J-Hop had taken
on characteristics more nearly
like those of today, when it be-
came an annual event requiring
the music of two bands and a
new home, "an old rink down-
town.
For the next two years, Gran-
ger's Dancing Academy was the
scene of the event and the admit-
tance price was raised to $1 per
couple.
* * *
NEXT, the Hop moved to Wa-

terman Gymnasium, where it was
known as the "Annual Ball" and
presented by nine literary frater-
nities.
The following year was when
the trouble began to brew, with
the remaining four of the 13
campus fraternities demanding
the right to present the dance.
The nine older fraternities re-
fused their request, and the feud
began, resulting in two J-Hops
that year.
The four outcasts, succeeding
in renting Waterman Gym after
30 independents had agreed to at-
tend, sponsored "The First Annaul
Promenade." The nine older fra-
ternities moved to Toledo to pre-
sent the "Twentieth Annual Ball
of the Palladium Fraternities."
* * * .
BOTH DANCES were great suc-
cesses, but the Regents stepped in
to smooth out the fracas, ruling
that in the future, fraternities and
independents would have equal
representation on the planning
committee 'for one big dance.
In "the good old days" custom
dictated that guests were re-
ceived while concert music
played between 9 and 10 p.m.
then the committee chairman
and his date would circle the
gym in the grand march until
the line was three couples deep
angd a block 'M' was formed,
which was followed by regular
dancing.
In 1900 the J-Hop, attended by
250 couples, boasted the unique
feature of having a "large number
of coeds present--more than at
any previous hop." This was un-
usual because of the fact that
coeds were extremely unpopular
dates in those days.
* . .*
IF A MAN had no hometown
girl to ask he usually stayed home

from the J-Hop in preference to
being subjected to the torture of
an evening with a "coed."
Early Hops, as well as those
of today, were the signal for a
weekend of gaiety, which includ-
ed such events as a play by the
Comedy Club, fraternity house
parties and concerts.
Another reason for the liveli-
ness of the weekend was because
of the country sheriff, who oper-
ated his own detective agency. For
a $5 fee he would shadow Hop
guests and report their activities
to parents or neglected girlfriends.
* * *
IN 1913 the practice of letting
spectators sit in the gallery came
to a "riotou" issue. The J-Hop
committee had decided to dis-
continue the precedent, but in-
stead of succeeding in their ven-
ture, they caused a "mild" riot.
At midnight, 50 "toqued" (tip-
sy) students and townspeople
led the riot, gaining entrance by
ramming the door with a gas
pipe.
They were met by a janitor,
wielding a pair ofr Indian clubs,
and the battle ensued with stones
and fire extinguishers, resulting
in $25 damage to the gym and
dismissal of an intern accused of
hitting the janitor.
* * *
THAT-SAME year saw the first
injury to a guest in the history of
the Hop, although it was not
caused by the riot. ,During a more
"lively" dance number, a male
student slipped on the slippery
floor and broke his ankle.
During World War I, many
students had waited in vain for
tickets for several days and
moved by their protests, the
committee decided to present a

miniature Hop
However, the
demanding "all

in the Union.
crowd refused,
or nothing."

In 1920 came the raving maniac,
said to have been caused-by the
dresses worn at the dance, for
that was the year when women's
dancing attire hit the apex of
the daring."
The Daily reported that "prac-
tically every gown had narrow
shoulder straps, tight bodices and
fairly short skirts, narrow at the
bottom." As a result, The Daily
continued, "one medical student is
reported to have gone raving mad
and to have torn around the floor
crying: "Modesty, where is thy
sting!"
With this colorful 76 year old
history behind them, the '53 J-Hop
committee will present their
"Grande Baroque" from 9 p.m. to
3 a.m. Friday, Feb. 6 at the IM
building.
Work Program
In Private Homes
Open to Women
Opportunities to live in private
homes are offered to campus wo-
men who are willing to exchange
some time in working in these
homes.
By devoting spare hours to car-
rying out light household chores
and in caring for children, wo-
men can earn both room and
board.
Ann Arbor householders, living
close to campus, are being inter-
viewed at this time by Mrs. Les-
lie in the Dean of Women's office.
Those interested may contact Mrs.
Leslie by calling 3-1511, extension
341.

RUTH ANN HART
4 * *

ANN ERICKSON
* * *

JUNE VOLLRATH
* * *

Coeds' Engagements Made Known

d~cpc44 Catpu4

I

NEWCOMERS',;GROUP - The
first program of the Faculty Wo-
men's Newcomers' Group will be
held at 7:45 p.m. today in the
Michigan League. The group will
present a bridge and canasta party.
* * S
PING-PONG TOURNAMENT-
Names of winners in house ping-
pong tournaments must be turned
in to Jackie Turner, 2-3159, by
Friday. The all-campus tourna-
ment will take place during the
first week of next semester. House
winners will be notified about play-
ing times.
* * *
RIFLE-CLUB-Rifle Club mem-
bers will meet for practice as us-
ual this week. Club manager, Ann
Batchelder, has urged all coeds to
attend. Reorganization of the club
will take place early next semester.

Mc Lea n-Szo r
On December 25, the engage-
ment of Marjorie McLean, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. A. N. McLean
of Royal Oak, to Samuel Szor, son
of Mr. and Mrs. S. Szor of Toledo,
was announced at a family din-
ner party.
Miss McLean is a senior in the
School of Nursing and is a mem-
ber of Alpha Delta Pi. Mr. Szor
graduated from the School of
Music last year and was affiliated
with Phi Gamma Delta.
A June wedding in Ann Arbor
is planned.
Foley-Wimpenny
The engagement of Mary Jean
Foley, daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
H. S. Foley of Dearborn, to Lt.
Arthur Wimpenny, Jr., son of Mr.
and Mrs. Arthur Wimpenny of
Chicago, was announced recently.
Miss Foley is a senior in the
School of Education. Lt. Wimpen-
ny, a 1952 graduate of the School
of Natural Resources, was presi-
dent of the Forestry Club last
year. He is now stationed at March
Air Force Base in California.
A June wedding is being
planned.
S * * *
Leavesley-Poole
Mrs. Morrel G. Leavesley of Bad
Axe, Mich., recently announced the
engagement of her daughter El-
eanor to Duane E. Poole, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Poole, also of
Bad Axe.
Miss Leavesley is a sophomore in
the School of Nursing and Mr.
Poole is a sophomore at Albion
College.

Hart-Lyndall
Dr. and Mrs. Raymond A. Hart
of Saginaw announced the engage-
ment of their daughter, Ruth Ann,
to Frank S. Lyndall, Jr. on Decem-
ber 28.
Miss Hart received her B.S. in
Dental Hygiene from the Uni-
versity in 1952 and was affiliated
with Zeta Tau Alpha.
Mr. Lyndall was graduated from
Purdue University in 1951. He is
now doing graduate worktin Busi-
ness Administration at the Uni-
versity and is a member of Phi
Kappa Sigma.
Erickson-Rauner
Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Erickson of
Whitewater, Wis., have announced
the engagement of their daughter,
Ann, to Vincent J. Rauner, son
of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Rauner of
Detroit.
Miss Erickson is a junior in the
School of Nursing.
Mr. Rauner is a senior in law
school and a member of Delta
Theta Phi and Eta Kappa Nu.
* *R *
Voll rath-I rving
The engagement of June Voll-
rath, daughter of Col. Bernard H.
Vollrath of Rosedale Park, Detroit
and the late Mrs. Vollrath, to
George W. Irving, son of Mrs.
George R. Irving of Fieldston, N.Y.,
and the late Dr. Irving was an-
nounced at Miss Vollrath's home
on New Year's eve.
Miss Vollrath will graduate from
the School of Education in Feb-
ruary. She is affiliated with Chi
Omega sorority.

Mr. Irving is a veteran of World
War II and Korea, and is now
studying for his doctor's degree in
Speech at the University. He is on
the faculty at Michigan State Col-
lege. Mr. Irving received his mas-
ter's degree from the University
and is a member of Sigma Phi Ep-
silon fraternity.
* *
Sherbrooke-Adams
Mr. and Mrs. 0. Herbert Sher-
brooke of Cohasset, Mass., have
announced the engagement of
their daughter, Courtney Withing-
ton, to F. Gerard Adams, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Adams of
Saginaw.
Miss Sherbrooke received her
Bachelor of Music degree from the
University in 1950 and is present-
ly enrolled in graduate school here.
Mr. Adams was awarded his
Bachelor's and Master's degree
from the University and is now a
candidate for his Ph.D. in Eco-
nomics.
Announcements
Students wishing to have
wedding or engagement an-
nouncements in The Daily be-
fore next semester, should
bring information to the Wom-
en's Desk by 5 p.m. tomorrow.
If pictures are to accompany
announcements, a $1.50 charge
is required for engraving. All
pictures which have appeared
in The Daily, may be picked up
at the desk.

BEER " WINE * CHAMPAIGNE * LIQUOR
MEATS and GROCERIES

ENTERTAINING NEEDS
FOR EVERY PARTY OCCASION

123 East Washington

Riley's Capitol Market
Open every evening until 1 :00
Sunday until Midnight

'a PRINTING
an KING SIZE SERVICE
N ~Card to a Ca ta log by
a Push Button
a LOWER PRICES
Downtown - 307 N. Main
N
N
QUALITY PAINTING
!tana-Iae.eaw ,. tss~a~ eeta

.
;'ut+: R
'
T
-°11Cr "

30a ff

I

Identification and
Job Applications
Photographs
Palmer Studio
208 Mich. Theatre Bldg.

= ii

I

.,

/.

RELAX
WITH A HOBBY

We have selected a special group of Men's and
Ladies' Watches which we are offering at about
13 off. These watches are all from our regular
stock and are fully guaranteed. None were
purchased for sale purposes.

O,

When the pressure is on at the end of the semester,
clear brain-fog with a relaxing hobby.
MODEL TRAINS - MODEL AIRPLANES
MODEL SHIPS - OLD TIME CARS
MODEL SUPPLIES of All Kinds at

TYPEWRITERS
ADDING MACHINES
WIRE RECORDERS
Bought, Sold, Rented
and Repaired
Desks, Chairs, Steel Files
MORRI LL'S
314 State St. Phone 7177
Open Saturdays until 5 P.M.

.

I

Sib Iep'4 Ji eet e
308 South State

FOREST AVE.
JUST OFF SO. U.

I

I

SELL ALL YOUR
TEXT BOOKS
FOR
CASH
OR EXCHANGE
AT

RMEJS

115'W. Liberty St.
Phone' 8950

I

11

;n

MAIN AT LIBERTY ANN ARBOI

fake A

#Cw

4e :;rr

RESOLUTION

Jcanucy Clearance

year-round
news!
luxury-lined !

. -

That your next job will be

a job with a Future!

You'll find 20% to 50% reductions on:

Dresses

Coats

s acony suits of Palm Beacei'35

Michigan Bell has classes starting as early as Janu-

I --"QQL Qlf- Njv I

, I

,II

III

111111

t_.......1., Di_..---

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan