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December 19, 1952 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

A GLTWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.,

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1952

PAROCHIAL AID?
Leaders Dispute Religious
Instruction in Schools

Novelaires Caroling

G---

By DOROTHY MYERS
Local educational and religious
leaders expressed sharp disagree-
ment this week over the question
of whether religion should be
taught in public schools and what
government aid should be given
to private schools.
President James B. Conant of
Harvard University , touched off#
the argument last spring in a
speech saying that private high
schools were a "devise influence
in American society and that fed-
eral aid to such schools might be
dangerous."
THE ROMAN Catholic bishops
then issued a 3,000 word state-
ment deploring what they called
"efforts to divorce religion from
education." The bishops said that
many people are trying to secu-
larize all public schools and tol
claim for such schools a total mo-
nopoly of education.
"The state has the duty to
help parents fulfill their task
of religious instruction and
training," the bishops declared.
"When the state fails in this
help by depriving children of
their right under our federal
Constitution to auxiliary serv-
ices, this can only be regarded
Hatcher Lauds
Oosterbaan
Football coach Bennie G. Oos-
terbaan received high praise from
President Harlan H. Hatcher when
the coach was introduced to the
Ann Arbor Rotary Club at their
luncheon meeting yesterday.
Hatcher spoke bf Oosterbaan as
one of the great teachers on our
faculty. "No man better repre-
sents the things for which our
University stands - integrity,
leadership, ability and sportsman-
ship-than Bennie," he said.
Commenting on the season just
past, and some interesting inci-
dents ofnthe early coaching days
here, Oosterbaan told his audience
about the late Fielding H. Yost,
the idol of his early playing. An-
ecdotes of his early coaching days
at Michigan under Yost highlight-
ed Oosterbaan's talk.,
Four assistant coaches present
were Jack L. Blott, Georg V. Cei-
thaml, J. T. White and Don Rob-
inson.
Ph. 3-5651
Starts
TODAY

as an utterly unfair and short-
sighted policy," they added.
James B. Edmonson, dean emer-
itus of the School of Education
commented that'our nation grants
all churches a maximum degree of
freedom in religious instruction,
but seeks to avoid giving any
c.h u r c h a preferred position
through direct or indirect aid from
public schools.
Edmonsonsadded that "some
persons are insisting that pub-
lic schools should actually teach
religion-preferably the tenets
of their chosen faith."
"Our non-sectarian p u b li c
school system has been praised as
the American solution to the prob-
lem of educating children of di-
verse religious and national ori-
gins in a spirit of friendliness,
tolerance and unity," he said.
THE REV. FR. Frank J. Mc-
Phillips of St. Mary's Catholic
Chapel agreed entirely with the
bishops. He claimed that people
today are living in a "spiritual
Dark Ages."
Some University professors, he
added, habitually scoff at reli-
gion during classes.
On the question of federal aid
to parochial schools, Father Mc-
Phillips said that since parochial
schools must meet educational
standards, they should profit from
tax-sponsored auxiliaries suchas
school lunches, bus transportation
and textbooks.
Father McPhillips believed
that there should be an oppor-
tunity for all religions to preach
in schools today because "a stu-
dent constantly loses sight of his
purpose in life without religious
trainig."
The Supreme Court has ruled
that public school students in New
York State could be released from
classes to receive religious train-
ing away from school property.
Another of the coulft's decisions
gave permission for tax money to
be used for auxiliary services to
private schools, but not allstates
provide such aid.
Work To Begin
On NewHighway
Work on the first of a series of
projects designed to relocate high-
way M-17 and consequently take it
out of Ann Arbor is expected to
start Monday.
Johnson-Greene company of
Ann Arbor was announced as low
bidder for the contract to con-
struct a grade separation over the
Ann Arbor Railroad, located one
and a half miles south of Ann
Arbor.
The separation will be a part
of the plan to form a by-pass
from highway U.S. 12, just west
of Ann Arbor, to the extension
of the Willow Run Express-
way at U.S. 23, southeast of Ann
Arbor.

-Daily-Larry Wilk
CAROLING-The Novelaires Quartet sing carols at the bedside of a patient in the polio ward of the
University Hospital.
GRAVE ROBBING SUSPECTED:
Past Med Students Hold Riotous Reputation

By JOYCE FICKIES
Although present day medical
students have the reputation of
being able to do herculean amounts
of work, most of them can't hold
a candle to the variety which ex-
isted on campus a century ago.
Occasionally, classes would treat
an over-zealous first year medic
to a jolting ride by passing him
over their heads to the back of the;

lecture room, a bump on the head
when he reached the back wall
being his penalty for being ob-
noxious.
* * *
AND ONCE a medical class held
a public book-burning ceremony
immediately after a final exam-
ination, protesting against what
they felt to be too strict an in-
structor.

Confused Punctuation Seen
On Local Christmas Cards

By HARRY LUNN
'Twas the first, second or third
Noel?
Though this question might seem
mere gibberish, it sums up a
Christmas card controversy which
started in a local bookstore when
two faculty members found several
variations in punctuation of the
traditional "Noel" greeting.
* * *
CONFUSED greeting card pro-
ducers with evidently only a lim-
ited knowledge of the French lan-
guage have placed the twin dot
punctuation of Noel in a variety
of places, according to John Wei-
mer of the English department,
Ike To Receive
Christmas Cake
NEW YORK - (') - President-
elect Eisenhower will receive to-
day a 50 pound Christmas cake
baked for the general and Mrs.

who made the discovery with Prof.
Marvin Felheim, also of the Eng-
lish department.
A cursory examination of
cards revealed that some manu-
facturers located the twin dots
(more technically termed the
"diaresis") over the "e," while
others placed it oyer "o" and sev-
eral resolved the conflict by de-
leting the mark entirely.
(The Daily would be glad to go
along with this style rule, but un-
fortunately our typographical ma-
chines lack the diaresis mark, and
we must use the uncultured ver-
sion of Noel.)
(Technically speaking, the
mark shows that you have to
pronounce both vowels, Weimar
said.
No great movement to banish
the incorrect Noel cards was ap-
parent, but one dealer laughingly
maintained that he was fairly sure
all his cards were correct.
And no one seemed to be par-
ticularly alarmed about receiving

But the most spirited crew of
all was a class in the early
1850's which not only hit, the
books, but actually took up arms
in defense of their classroom
building.
The story of the embryonic civil
war is related in an early Michi-
gan Alumnus article written by
Dr. Robert Clark Kedzie, first
demonstrator of anatomy and one
of six graduates of the medical
class of 1851.
* * *
IT BEGAN when Ann Arbor's
year round residents grew suspi-
cious over how dissection speci-
mens were obtained for the
school's anatomy labs. Since there
was no legalized way of obtaining
the specimens, people suspected
that they were provided by grave
robbing.
These dark suspicions reached
their highest, most bitter pitch
when it was discovered that a
grave a few miles from Ann Ar-
bor had been robbed "under
atrocious circumstances," with
fragments of broken coffin and
bits of torn shroud found near-
by.
Wrathful townspeople, charging
the offense to the school, gathered
to protest, and, egged on by a
"taproom demagogue," soon an-
nounced their intention of "burn-
ing that butcher shop of human
flesh, and scattering the young
crop of sawbones that would not
let the dead sleep in their graves."
HOWEVER, medic-spies in the
mob warned their fellow students
and a defense was quickly arrang-
ed for the medical building, locat-
ed on the east side of the campus
square, near the present site of
West Medical Bldg.
That night a guard of 100 arm-
ed students patrolled the campus,
using passwords to keep the arson-
bent enemies from their building.
But when the mob saw the well-
organized defense, their attack fiz-
zled out and they went home to
cool off, leaving the medical build-
ing to stand for half a century.
All that came of the affair was
an unsuccessful law suit charging
desecration of graves.

Frey Urges
Streamlining
Of Elections
LANSING - 0P) - Michigan's
election machinery needs stream-
lining and considerable changing
for more efficiency, State Elections
Director Edward W. Frey said yes-
terday.
In a report on the 1952 elec-
tions, Frey said "a good start"
has been made toward instructing
local election officials, "a begin-
ning" has been made toward
clarifying election laws and "some
progress" has been made in edu-
cating the public on election mat-
ters.
- s
HIS MAJOR criticism was of
local election officials who make
no effort to improve procedures.
He said another serious problem
was the complete lack of state
control in selecting precinct elec-
tion workers.
Frey said that 12 county
clerks had refused to attend two
election instruction schools con-
ducted by the state.
"The old time election worker in
too many cases feels he knows all.
there is to know about elections,"s
Frey said.
In some counties, he said, there
exists "antagonism or downright;
bullheadedness" against election
schools.
* * *
ELECTION OFFICIALS often
are far too old to do their jobs,
Frey said. Many of them are se-
lected out of charity or to pay
political debts, he charged.
Frey said county clerks should
be given legal control over at
least three workers in each pre-
cinct polling place.
He proposed that election work-
ers forfeit their pay if they re-
fuse to attend at least one elec-
tion school.
He also suggested a simple civ-
il service examination for elec-
tion workers and a 55-year age
limit.
Freed Twins
Show Effects
Of Operation
CHICAGO - (P) - The newly-
divided Brodie Siamese twins
went separate ways yesterday aft-
er their historic operation, one
becoming conscious but the other
taking a turn for the worse an
then improving only slightly.
The latest bulletin on the condi-
tion of the twins, issued by the
University of Illinois gave this re-
port:
"Rodney - has regained con-
sciousness. Cries and smiles. Con-
dition is stable. Seems to be good.
"Roger-still in very precarious
condition, although respiration
and other vital factors have im-
proved slightly during the morn-
ing."
This improvement cheered sur-
geons who Wednesday had to
make one of the most difficult de-
cisions they ever faced.
At the height of the 12 hour
and 40 minute operation, they
discovered their earlier fears
were well founded. There was
only one saggital sinus, the main
passage-way or vein draining
blood back from both brains.
This called for an immediate
choice. The incision could be made
to give one twin or the other the
vital vein.
Dr. Eric Oldberg, head of the
University of Illnois department

of neurology, said Rodney - the
smaller of the twins - got the
break because he was holding up
much better under the strain of
the operation, and surgery in his
favor could be more easily per-
f ormed.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Tuesday, a briefcase in yellow
leather, probably in Follets, contain-
ing Newcombs Soc. Psych. Contents
important, not briefcase. Call Lenar-
do, 2-1522. Leave a message if not
home. ) 73L
LOST-Small coin purse, Arcade post
office. Reward. Call days 3-1531, Ext.
526, after 5:30, phone 2-7662. )74L
FOR SALE
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models:
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
21 x 31 PACEMAKER speed graphic,
fully equipped, like new. Phone Henry
Arnold 3-4141. )40L
PARAKEETS, babies and breeders, ca-
naries, singers, cages and supplies. 305
W. Hoover. Phone 2-2403. )85
ASSORTMENT of Xmas Trees $1.50
and up. Kates Place, Phone 8134.
Drive in, free parking, Pontiac Road
at the railroad tracks, one block west
of Broadway Signal Light. Open 9
a.m. to 9 p.m. Sundays and evenings.
)120
TAIL COAT-Double-breasted tux com-
bination. Size 38-39 long. Also ox-
ford grey overcoat. Size 38. Cali
3-1886. )123
MENS RACCOON COAT. In superb con-
dition, large size. Phone 3-4707. )127
CANARIES-Beautiful singers and fe-
males. Mrs. Ruffus, 562 S. Seventh.
) 136
HAND MADE, unborn calf wallets,
beautifully designed. Burr Patts,
1209 S. University. )119
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS for couples, only 1 black from
campus. very desireable clean rooms.
Reasonable rent. 116Church, Mrs.
Smith, Mgr. Ph. 2-4744. )37R
ROOMS FOR OVERNIGHT GUESTS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R
NEAR CAMPUS-Small single room for
male student. $5.50 per week. 813 E.
Kingsley. )34R
ROOM AND BOARD
WILL HAVE a few vacancies for sec-
ond semester for advanced mein stu-
dents. Innersprings, showers, linens.
Good food, rebate on meals. 2-6422.
)6X

TRANSPORTATION
UNIV. COUPLE want ride to Chicago
Dec. 23 or 24. 2-0226 after 6 p.m. )16T
HELP WANTED
STUDENT to work for n eals as cook's
helper. 2-6422. )60H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS1 Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and service.
Morrill's
314 S. State St., Phone 7177. )8B
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & 'r.v.
"Student Service"
1215 So. Uni., Ph. 7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )15B
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
Ironing. Rluff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. ON
CHRISTMAS shopping made easy. Call
6007 for gift subscriptions. We handle
special gift rates for all periodicals.
Student Periodical Agency.
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable.
Prompt service. 914 Mary St., 3-4449,
)12B
GOOD Rental Typewriters available at
reasonable rates. Office Equipment
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Phone 2-1213.
)4B
MISCELLANEOUS
BEEN MEANING to find out about our
student faculty and regular specials,
haven't you? Well, if you are not do-
ing anything why not inquire now.
Student Periodical Agency, 6007. )17M

READ
AND

CLASSIFIEDS

4

t

USE

Daily
Classifieds

ir

IN ANN ARBOR

I

DARRYL F. ZANUCK 'S
Production of
r
fr byLOUIS
BROMFIELD
A 20th CENTURYFOX ENCORE TRIUMPHII
~ POWER
Brenda Joyce.- Nigel Bruce ' Maria Ouspenskaya
Joseph Schildkraut " Mary Nash "Jane Darwell
Mariorie Rambeau."Henry Travers -'B.BWarner
WISHING THE
HAPPI EST
HOLI DAYS
TO ALL

Eisenhower by students of Chad- one of the cards with incorrect us
sey High School, Detroit. age of the diaresis, since the style
The presentation will be made in violations have probably gone or
the general's Commodore Hotel without change for many years.
ENDS TODAY headquarters this morning by Rob- "There's nothing French abou
ert Neff of United Airlines, which the cards except the expression
j All flew the cake here from Detroit. anyway," Weimar concluded.
I6i1 'II~

[e
in
t
a,

B---- L
Saturday
RICHARD
WI DMARK
in
"MY PAL GUS"

I

Weekdays 6:30 to 11:30
Sat., Sun. 1:30 to 11:30
ADMISSION ... 44c
TODAY & SAT.
H OWARD HAWK$

Today and Saturday
A LAWLESS
EMPIRE ruled
by a rabble
f <.:.; . rmyl

it's the V.F.W. Club for
DANCING
Friday and Saturday Nites
Members
and Guests
314 E. Liberty St.
DON BAILEY Ph. 2-3972
Your Singing Host C -UB You Must Be 21
HALL RENTALS & BANQUETS
Leave after your last class--
FLYP'UNITED
-BE HOME FOR THE
HOLIDAYIS
/N A FEW HOURS
Detroit: for reservations, call WOodward 2-5330 or
an authorized travel agent
COMPARE THE FARE AND YOU'LL GO BY AIR

'I

ECHNICOLa,

I

Milk, W

tZ'ahce to WOODY HERMAN

Merry Christmas
Everyone

I

1

TO
FRIENDS & PATRONS 4
We will be open from 7 A.M. to 7 P.M. through

co-starring
KIRK DOUGLAS - DEWEY MARTIN
S*
A trNft"AI. #
I TERNATONA
Mooree. OSU IVAN .dmnd GWENN
.Charles DRAKE *-and BONZO
"HOUNDTROUBLE" Cartoon

... ROBERT RYAN4
JULIA ADAMS
VNIVERSAWINTERNATIONAt Rock HUDSON
PICTURE
Sunday
"EIGHT
IRON
MEN"
A MERRY CHRISTMAS
TO ALL

I

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 26th
9' tit 1

Tickets available
at Armory daily
after 4 P.M.

GRAND RAPIDS
Grand Rapids,

I

Pe-~a

ARMORY
Mich.

$00

rOOMrOWSWAMM

.rr wr
,..

Can
vI 1VU l W AL V' A

0

per Person
tax incl.

i

It

1,

9,

MORI
EVEN
THAI
Weber
pare f
COinCi

E ENJOYABLE
ING.. ,
N DINING OUT?
es pecially when you eat at " '
's where the ability to Pre-
food to your liking it not a
dence but an attainment.
0
PAUL THOMPKINS
at the Hammond

Riley's Capitol Market

t'

Open every evening until 13:00
Sunday until Midnight

I

I

11 mmonw. I

::;}:

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