100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 14, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

P~AGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1952

PLAN ACTIVE PROGRAM:
YD 's Work with City Dems
_________. . * -

By HELENE SIMON
The Young Democrats are ral-
lying their forces for an active
program stressing closer coordina-
tion with the city Democratic par-
ty as its inain objective.
For the first project of its new
policy the YD's are lending a hand
to put into shape the Democratic
headquarters, located at 103 S.
Fourth Ave.
"This is the first time the Dem-
ocratic party has set up perma-
nent headquarters in Republican
Washtenaw County since about
the time of the Civil War," YD
Presideft, Blue Carstenson, Grad.,
said.
IN ADDITION to cooperating
with the city party, the organiza-
tion hopes to work with county
and state Democrats. "We hope
to get something in return in the
form of knowledge of party organ-
ization," Neil Weller, Grad., chair-
:nan of the coordinating commit-
.ee, said.
YD officials have been invit-
ed to sit in on executive meet-
ings of the local party. The club
is also trying to get its members
to attend the Democratic coun-
ty meetings.
"There seems to be more en-
thusiasm among the club members
even after Stevenson's defeat
than after Truman's victory in
1948," Weller said.
IN COORDINATION with other
YD clubs throughout the nation,
the campus organization hopes to
start a fund campaign to finance
monthly radio and television
speeches by party leader Adlai
Stevenson.
The YD's are also planning to
bring nationally known speakers
to the campus a few times dur-
ing the year. In addition, the
club plans to schedule speakers
- at each of its bi-monthly meet-
ings.
To keep its members informed
on political issues YD will publish
a monthly newsletter.
Manning the headquarters will
take some of the time pf the club
members, and during the spring
elections YD's will help campaign.
At the present time the club is
helping with the gubernatorial
recount.

"M 1W
Mlerchants
Report City
Sales Rise
By GENE HARTWIG
If retail sales for the last three
weeks are any indication, Ann Ar-
bor should be getting, ready to
enjoy one of the merriest Christ-
mases in many years.
With local merchants reporting
sales increases over last year in al-
most all types of merchandise, the
picture for Ann Arbor falls right
in line with the five to ten per cent
sales increase felt throughout the
nation.
According to one Ann Arbor
merchant, while sales are ahead
of last year at this time, gift
seekers are more practical in
making their selections this year,
with emphasis on ready-to-wear
clothes and useful household
items.
Shoppers' tastes are showing a
tendency toward brighter colors
and more unusual designs in ties,
and less conservative styles in
men's apparel, according to one
State St. haberdasher.
Toy purchases on the other hand
show a tendency toward the ex-
travagant with the more expen-
sive trains, dolls, erector sets and
bicycles experiencing a rapid turn-
over.
STATE SALES tax revenues
seemed to verify a general trend
toward greater sales throughout
Michigan, showing a ten per cent
increase for the month of October
over last year at the same time.
Merchants contacted in various
business districts throughout the
city indicated that prices generally
are slightly lower this year with a
considerable improvement in the
quality of merchandise. Certain
luxury items were described as be-
ing slightly higher in price but
these increases were balanced by
cuts in the cost of such things as
(Continued on Page 6, Sec. II)
ISA To Meet
The International Students As-
sociation will meet at 7:30 p.m.
tomorrow in Rm. 3B of the Un-
ion to vote on a proposed consti-
tution for their organization.
The problem of legal advice for
foreign students will also be dis-
cussed at that time.

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Stanford Paper Blasts
Liquor Law Handling
The editorial board of the Stan- reaction would then demand a
ford Daily attacked the Attorney "more intelligent law that could
General of California, the admin- and would be reasonably enforc-
Istatin o Stnioci nivrsity

istration of Stanford University'
and the school's student body for
being hypocritical in dealing with
the present liquor problem,
Claiming that the law governing
the situation is disregarded and
unenforced, the board urged the
administration to start enforcing
it, and the Attorney General to
enforce the laws that are at his
disposal.
The editorial board hoped that
if this was done the student body's
City Yule Sing
SlatedToday
Ann Arbor's 24th annual Com-
munity Christmas Sing will take
place at 7 p.m. today in Hill Audi-
torium.
Seven choruses, totaling 350 peo-
ple, will sing special numbers in
scenes of early Christmas in Ann
Arbor and the traditional Nativity
Scene.
Sponsored by the Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce, the show will
include a Christmas play written
by Prof. O. W. Stephenson, head
of the Department of Social Stud-
ies at University High School and
Edith L. Hoyle Craig.

* * *
The Rutgers University board
of trustees demanded that two
of the school's professors ans-
wer questions about Communist
affiliations or be fired.
The professors had refused to
answer the questions before a
Senate internal security sub-
committee.
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY of Illinois'
Student Senate voted to permit
women candidates for Senate
membership to give campaign
speeches in organized men's hous-
es without chaperonage.
The proposal must now face
final approval by the Committee
on Student Affairs.
Honorary To Meet
Phi Sigma, biological honor so-
ciety, will initiate new members at
7:15 p.m. tomorrow in Rackham
Amphitheater.
Following the initiation, Dr. J.
V. Neel will speak on "The Gene-
tics of Sickle Cell Anemia." After
the speech a color film on fungi
and antibiotics, "Miracle from a
Mold," will be shown.
The speech and film showing
will be open to the public.

* READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
Becautiful
SWEATERS in
" pastel shades
. "*white
" black
" navy
h " brown
Short sleeve slipovers,
long sleeve slipovers and cardigans.
~95 29 5
16~~2~
FORMALS
NEW SHIPMENT DAILY
19.95 andupI

.4

-Daily-Alan Reid
YD MOVING DAY--Dave Kornbluh, '54, leans on broom' while
YD President Blue Carstenson, Grad., (in back of desk) and Neil
Weller, Grad., (in front of desk) handle the furniture-moving
job for the club.
Snow Removal Cost for City
Takes Drop from Last Year

fI

"No snow" is one city official'sv
answer to a sharp drop in figures
indicating the cost of snow re-
moval from $5,197 for November
of last year to $886 for the same
period this year.
According to Fred A. Mammel,
assistant to the city engineer, the
difference in the engineer's office,
figures stems simply from the drop
in the amount of snowfall.
Last year 15 inches of snow
had fallen by Dec. 1, beginning
with the storm on Nov. 6 when
the city was covered with an
eight-inch layer.
The occasional snow flurries

that came in November this year
disappeared almost before the city
could get its snow fighting equip-
ment on the streets.
During November, 1951, the
streets were cleared several times
by the city's snow plows and sev-
eral tons of chloride and sand
were used to combat ice and bad
driving conditions.
This year the snowplow crew
had to be called out only once in
addition to the application of a
relatively small amount of chlor-
ide and sand, Mammel comment-
ed.

Let Us Pay You
WHILE WE TEACH YOU a worth-while and very
important profession. That's right-we pay students
during their four to six week training period. How-
ever, this is only one of the many advantages to
working at Michigan Bell.
STOP IN at our Employment Office and let us tell
you about the many positions we have to offer in
December and January.
Michigan Bell Telephone Co.
Employment Office
323 East Washington St.

li~

Goin~g
.I4
' l Y
'p.

South?
Come in and see the latest
cruise wear on our new
ANCHOR AND
BEACH DECK
Choose from a thrilling selection of 1953
bathing suits styled by SEA NYMPH. Ten
beautiful new styles in sparkling new coi-
ors; green, navy, yellow, aqua, black, pink,
coral, purple and combinations . . . Sizes
32-40.

','
1
4 ' '
.:
J
f
<'

$895

$109

Also in our NEW CRUISE. SHOP . . . the
latest styles in cotton dresses.

wp' - I

r .z j .., zT rr aye' t#...._c i .. llf .IwtNAA t A A A J M ' Ll IJ I > w ::>;:::... .,.. F .. ".. °' ... .._

11111

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan