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December 10, 1952 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1952

-- THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

I I

All Selectors Like
oomaw, Lattner
UCLA, Irish Stars Only Gridders
To Make All-America Unanimously

CAGE COMMENT:
As Ebert Goes, So Will OSU Fortunes

* #.

-°----

By IVAN KAYE
All-America selectors seem to
be having a difficult time agreeing
on the nation's top football play-
ers.
Only U.C.L.A.'s giant Donn Moo-
maw and Notre Dame's superb
halfback, Johnny Lattner, are
mentioned on all of the teams re-
leased up to date.
* * *
y BILLY VESSELS of the Okla-
homa Sooners was the recipient
of the Heisman Trophy as the
outstanding back of the year, but
he failed to makehColliers' All
,America. Instead, his teammate
fullback Buck McPhail was given
a backfield position.
Another inconsistency was the
omission of Dick Modzelewski
from the Associated Press' All
America. The 235 pound Mary-
land tackle won the Outland
Trophy as the lineman of the
year. Thus both the back and
the lineman of the year failed
to make at least one of the All
America squads.
Appearing on many teams at
" the end positions were Tom Stol-
handske of Texas and Buck Mar-
tin of Georgia Tech. Stolhandske
was the outstanding performer on
offense for the Southwest Confer-
ence champions, while Martin was
outstanding on both offense and
defense for Bobby Dodd's great
Georgia Tech squad.
* * *
TWO FINE tackles from the
South gained recognition on a
number of teams, Modzelewski of
Maryland and Kline Gilbert of
Mississippi's unbeaten Rebels.
While Modzelewski was greatly
publicized throughout the season,
Gilbert's unsung accomplishments
were largely responsible for Ole
Mis' fine showing.
The Mississippi squad reached
its peak in the fourth quarter of
the game with Modzelswski's
Maryland club when it rolled to
two touchdowns and a startling
21-14 upset victory.
Mentioned on most All America
squads were guards Elmer Will-
hoite of Southern California and
Frank Kush of Michigan State.
Willhoite put the Trojans in the
Rose Bowl with a 73 yard run with
an intercepted Paul Cameron pass
in the U.C.L.A. game.
DURING ONE six-game stretch,
a total of 49 yards was gained
through his sector on defense. He
played the middle guard position
in Coach Jesse Hill's 5-3-2-1 de-
fensive formation.
Kush survived a near-tragic

accident during the summer to
bulwark the rugged Spartan line.
He caught a steel splinter in his
eye while working on a con-
struction job.
THE MICHIGAN STATE defen-
sive line was perhaps the strong-
est part of the entire Green and
White gridiron machine. It saved
both the Notre Dame and Purdue
games for Biggie Munn's crew.
Moomaw was everyone's All
America at center. The big
Bruin was perhaps the best line-
backer in the nation. His play
in the Southern California game
kept Coach Red Sanders' team
within striking distance until
the final gun. The Trojans had
the stronger line, but Moomaw
tended to equalize the teams.
The consensus backfield is made
up of Lattner, Vessels, Jack Sear-
bath of Maryland and Paul Giel
of Minnesota.
** *
LATTNER is probably the great-
est all-round player in college
football today. The only argu-
ments concerning the Notre Dame
star's ability center around wheth-
er he is better on offense or de-
f ense.
Vessels was the big reason
Coach Bud Wilkinson's Oklaho-
ma Sooners packed their potent
scoring punch. Even in a losing
effort against Notre Dame at
South Bend, the 185 pound split
"T" halfback was magnificent.
He scored three touchdowns on
long runs through the power-
ful Irish defensive line.
Scarbath was consistently bril-
liant in his dual running and pass-
ing role as the Terrapins' split
"T" quarterback. His uncanny
ability to pick out the weak spot
of the defense on his option play
was a headache to all opposition.
FINALLY, rounding out the All-
America eleven, comes the great
Giel of Winona, Minnesota and
Wes Fesler's Golden Gophers. He
is no stranger to Michigan fans,
having appeared in this stadium
twice, and both times being ex-
remely troublesome to the Wol-
verine defensive unit.
Giel was particularly effective
this season when running the
option play which gives him the
opportunity to pass or run de-
pending upon the defense. This
was much the same type of play
that catapulted Dick Kazmaier
to stardom with the Princeton
Tigers.

By DICK LEWIS
(Fourth in a Series)
On the shoulders of amazing
Paul Ebert rest the chances for
Ohio State's first Big Ten basket-
ball championship since Dick
Schnittker and company turned
the trick in 1950.
Tallest of the Buckeye regularsI
at 6-4, Ebert's scoring prowess as
a sophomore vaulted OSU to a
6-8 conference record and fifth
place standoff with Michigan
State.
AMONG HIS eye-catching
achievements in 1951-52 was a
40-point effort against Michigan
at Columbus. Ebert tossed in 15
field goals and ten free throws
that night to lead Coach Floyd
Stahl's charges to an easy 80-67
verdict.

MINNESOTA'S PAUL GIEL
... concensus All-America tailback

DONN MOOMAW
. .. all-All American

Jesse Owens Had Greatest Day on Ferry Field

The sharp-shooting pivot op-
erator from Columbus placed
second to Iowa's Chuck Darling
in the Western Conference scor-
ing tabulations with 304 points
in 14 encounters for a 21.4 aver-
age.
This gained Ebert recognition
on the all-conference first team
and the Michigan Daily honor five.
COMPETING in every one of
Ohio State's 22 games, Ebert fun-
nelled through 443 points, estab-
lishing five school records in the
process. He easily ran off with
the Buckeye most valuable player
award.
Captain Tom Williams, 6-3
defensive standout, heads a con-
tingent of proven performers in
one of the forward spots.
One of the taller men on the
probable starting unit which
averages only 6-2, Williams has
been hitting consistently from
outside in the Buck pre-season
drills.
Last year he hit often enough
to register 127 league markers
and came home 28th with a 9.1
average.
* * *
SIDING Williams in the front-
court is Bill Wilks, 6-2 senior who
joined the team late because of
the football wars.
Although Wilks saw limited
action over the past two years,
he managed to find the range
for 72 points in loop scraps dur-
ing the 1951-52 campaign. An
all-Ohio selection in 1949, Wilks

specializes in driving one-hand .
shots from all over the floor.
A couple of promising shooters
appear shoo-ins in the Ohio State
back-court.
MERRILL HATFIELD, rated the
best shot on the seam, is at one
guard spot, while hard-driving
Dean Cook holds down the other.
In all probability, Hatfield will
alternate with Jack Jones, a
regular last year who pumped in
67 Big Ten scores. Jones pos-
sesses an accurate set shot and
gets his share of rebounds.
Although only a sophomore,
Cook picks up a starting role in
the Stahl youth movement. He
won a varsity letter in his fresh-
man year, hitting for 53 points in
league action.
* * *
THE RAGGED Buckeye defense
which relinquished on the average
of 70 points per game last season
is expected to be strengthened by
the addition of a few football
standouts.
Tom Hague, Dave Leggett,
Dean Dugger, and Jack Croy
only recently made the switch
from the grid squad.
Hague received a letter last.
year, throwing in 20 points from
his forward post.
Bill French, 7-2 freshman, threw
a wrench into the future Ohio
State plans when he dropped out
of school. Coach Stahl's main de-
ficiency again seems to be lack
of height, and there is little r-
lief in sight.

4>

By ED SMITH
When people think of Track and
Field they think of Jessie Owens.
When people think of Jesse
Owens they think of the 1936
Olympics and Owens' one man
crusade against Hitler's thinclads
and their racial superiority
claims, but somehow the memory
of Owens' greatest day is all but
forgotten except to a few track'
diehards.
THOUGH a brilliant high school
track flash in Cleveland, he was
just one step from the greenest
rookie, when he came to Ann Ar-
bor in May, 1935, with his Ohio
State teammates for the Big Ten
track championships.
It was the 165-pound, 5-11
sophomore's first big fling in
collegiate track.
What he did that day still
stands as the brightest page in
the big Ten record book. The first
event was the 100 yard dash.

Dwens streaked over the cen-
tury mark in the swift time of
:09.4 to equal the world record
for the distance.
THE NEXT event was the 220.
He didn't even bother to use a
starting block, but dug a little
pit for himself with his spikes. The
result was another world's rec-
ord, a nifty :20.3.
Next of the program was the
broad jump, Owens' favorite
event. He calmly strode to the
edge of the pit and placed a
piece on paper in the sand at 26
feet.
Then slowly he walked to the
start of the runway, paused for a
second and took off down the
* Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

runway. His foot hit the edge of
the board and he was airborn on
the longest leap ever recorded by
a human being, 26 feet, eight and
one-fourth inches. To this day
broadjumpers are shooting for
that mark.
ONLY ONE event was left for
him-the 220-yard low hurdles.
It was automatic as he romped
to an easy win with another world
record. The time was :22.6.
Owens' performance was made
even more remarkable by the
fact that he was not in the best
physical condition. It seems that

the day before the meet he had,
fallen down a flight of stairs
and hurt his back.
Phil Diamond, Michigan's famed
track expert, remembers the day
well, as he was the official timer
for the meet. According to him it
had rained Friday so that when
the sun came out on Saturday it
dried the track to perfect con-
dition.
Unbelievably even with this
inspired performance from Owens
the Buckeyes did not win the
meet. The Wolverines piled up
enough points in other events to
win the meet, 47 to 44.

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