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December 10, 1952 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1952-12-10

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I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1952

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Po'in ted

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On Howard Fast

"You Say The Reports Are Greatly Exaggerated?"

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By HARLAND BRIT
Daily Associate Editor
NOTHER REVEALING educational sur-
vey has come to us from the New York
Times' reliable education editor Benjamin
Fine. His findings deserve careful consid-
eration by those who are interested in the
ause of broad liberal education in our
$chools and colleges.
In short, Fine shows that of the money
set aside for research in our institutes
of higher learning, 90 per cent of the
' funds goes for research in the physical or
biological sciences, leaving only a slight
amount set aside for the humanities and
'0ocial science.
=The chief reason for this situation lies in
the relation of our research work to the
"federal government. Six out of every seven
dollars devoted to research comes from
Washington. This amounts to $300,000,000,
Cand Fine claims that "virtually none of the
i Government's funds find their way into the
social sciences or liberal arts." Thus. Am-
. erican university's must look to industry and
; private sources for their funds for this type
:of work.
Educational leaders are naturally con-
cerned over this imbalance. This financial
relationship between disciplines is com-
pletely out of proportion to their intrin-
rsie educational relationship. The loud
voice of talking money may lure the top
talent in both research and teaching to
scientifc pursuits, leaving the humani-
ties with their archives. The application
eof expensive techniques and methods to
t 'the teaching of science may leave the so-
cial sciences in a relatively subordinate
l position. The implications of these find-
f. ings are certainly most foreboding.
~r But the situation is not difficult to ex
splain a period of national emergency,
the government has a huge list of applied
scientific research projects; necessary for
the national defense. The universities have
always been a great source of research in
this country.
Thus the problem is not one of limiting
the grants to the sciences, but of securing
more funds for the liberal arts. And here
the govprnment has the obligation to correct
the imbalance its defense program is caus-
ing As one columnist put it, we could "con-
tribute to the holding of those other lines,
which are not the battle lines but the rea-
, son for forming battle lines." Government
foundations and grants for work in the hu-
. Inanities, and for improved teaching meth-
ods, which are equally important, seem the
only solution to the problem.
The private non-profit agencies, such
as the Ford foundation, must also recog-
I nize this dilemna, and channel their funds
, accordingly. And university-sponsored re-
search programs and foundations could
do well to survey the etire educational
field before automatically awarding their
funds to the science departments.
Money may be regarded as a dubious
educational incentive, but when it speaks in
as loud a voice as it does today, we must
take care to spend it in the interests of
our cultural, scientific, and defensive goals.
DORIS FLEESON:
Ike &Taft
WASHINGTON - Recent events have
pointed up a significant fact. Mr. Re-
publican Is now Gen. Dwight Eisenhower,
not Sen. Robert A. Taft.
Such is the power of the Presidency
The Washington seismograph, a very sen-
sitive instrument, registered an Ohio earth-
quake last week when Senator Taft blasted
Secretary of Labor-designate Durkin as "an
incredible choice .. an affront to millions
"of union members" The political trade be-
gan watching the machine carefully for
echoing shocks from presumed Taft Re-
publicans.
Nothing has happened, but the thunders
of silence, like the Sherlock Holmes dog
which didn't bark, are equally revealing.
Republicans got their first President in

20 years and they are showing no dispo-
sition to tear him down even in suppoort
of so admired a colleague as Senator
Taft. This is politics.
History bears out a general proposition
once stated by former Sen. Burton K.
Wheeler, when he began a quarrel with
Franklin D. Roosevelt, as follows: "Nobody
gets great by fighting a President of his
own party." Senator Wheeler lived to prove
it in his own case; he was defeated soon
afterward for re-election and is today out
of politics.
Senator Taft Is now securely anchored
in the Senate. It is difficult to imagine
his not being a strong force there. He is,
of course, a much more regular Republi-
can than Senator Wheeler was a Demo.
crat.
Yet, with this one poorly timed blast he
has lost important ground. Veteran Repub..
lican politicians are saying that:
1-Mr. Durkin will be confirmed, barring
unforeseen developments, so the immediate
battle is lost even if the Senator decides to
pursue it.
2-Senator Taft has injured his own
"availability" for majority leader. This is
equivalent to losing ground in the war.

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
Daily Associate Editor
THE APPROXIMATELY sixty persons who
gathered Saturday to hear left-winger
Howard Fast present his views on American
literature, and what he apparently consid-
ered to be related subjects, were treated to
a glib, but nevertheless bald rendition of
the party line. Couched in terms of "literary
analyses," Fast's talk was a poor excuse for
an analysis of anything. It was constructed
of obvious half-truths, outlandish observa-
tions, factual distortions and unproved
statements of "fact." Running through it
all was a singularly simple approach to lit-
erature which any English-one * student
could easily refute,
The author's thesis ran something like
this: American literature, currently in a
state of decline, is suffering because Amer-
ica is today a police state. Only when
Americans are "free" again will good lit-
erature be produced here.
The existence of this "police state" is the
only factor keeping Americans from creat-
ing great literary master-pieces, according
to Fast.
Aside from the fact that Fast could pro-
vide no evidence of his American "police"
state, which he slyly equated with Hitler
Germany and Mussolini's Italy, his assump-
tion that one thing, and one thing only
could determine a human endeavor so com-
plicated as the creation of literature is, at
best, ridiculous. As does any human pro-
cess, the writing of literature depends on
many diverse elements, and can never be
explained by one single reason.
That literature today is suffering from
drabness, pessimism or vulgarity is a view
held by many people, ,some of them crit-
ics of note. But the "degenerate" label 1
which Fast indiscriminately placed on all

recent American literature is, again, a
generalization which would not stand up
under any kind of scrutiny. Although he
rapped Hemingway's "Old Man and the
Sea," and Steinbeck's "East of Eden,"
others of critical ability have cited these
efforts as substantial and possibly even
great works of art. In any period it is
difficult to appraise current works, just
as it is difficult to understand the full
force of historical events when they are
happening. Scholars, critics and histor-
ians are usually the first to admit this.
Fast, on the other hand, would purport
not only to fully understand the course
literature is taking today, but to have the
one answer to all its problems,
Actually, Fast's criteria for "good" litera-
ture seemed to be solely the potential it has
for being put to political advantage.
Hemingway in the 30's was O.K., but
the author of the "Old Man and the Sea"
is a bourgeois decadent; Steinbeck 15
years ago was great as the creator of such
masterpieces as the "Grapes of Wrath,"
but today he's only a tool and a hack;
Irwin Shaw, formerly a stirring writer,
has "compromised his art," and through
fear (of the "police state") produced the
war-mongering "Young Lions."
At the lecture's end, the question period
which Fast so elusively squirmed through
showed clearly that the bulk of his audi-
ence considered hisarguments fantastic. To
most of his "intelligent college audience"
it was inconceivable that he could expect
anyone to consider his theory a valid one,
At best, it was a mildly interesting presen-
tation. But its defects were too obvious to
warrant serious consideration. In a way, a
lecture like this does a service, pointing out
as it does the almost blind lack of logic of
those who would subject art to a dogmatic
ideology,

t
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--iA

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
HORACE II. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 19 - January 29, 1953
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and recitations, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for= courses having recitations only, the time of the class is the
time of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be ex-
amined at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
12 o'clock classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes and other
"irregular" classes may use any examination period provided
there is no conflict (or one with conflicts if the conflicts are ar-
ranged for by the "irregular" classes).
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination. In the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examination may
be changed without the consent of the Committee on Examina-
iton Schedules.
Time of Class Time of Examination

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wi.scta oe.- -.m

ietteP TO THE EDITOR
The Daily welcomes communications from its readers on matters of
general interest, and will publish all letters which are signed by the writer
and in good taste. Letters exceeding 300 words in length, defamatory or
libelous letters, and letters which for any reason are not in good taste will
be condensed, edited or withheld from publication at the discretion of the
editors.

MONDAY
TUESDAY

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2
3
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Wednesday, January 21
Saturday, January 24
Tuesday, January 27
Monday, January 19
Tuesday, January 20
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Friday, January 23
Monday, January 26
Wednesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 20
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Monday, January 19

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.._..'

LETTERS

FROM

SCOTLAN D:

'Starvation' in Edinburgh

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Chuck Elliott, last year's
Daily managing editor, is now a graduate stu-
dent in English literature at Edinburgh. The
following is one of a series of articles which
Contain Mr. Elliott's impressions of the col-
legiate, and otherwise, life of the Scots.)
By CHUCK ELLIOTT
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND-Although they
usually don't realize it fully until they
leave home, Americans are quite thorough-
ly spoiled. Roast beef and automobiles are
commonplaces of international envy; the
American wails piteously about the prices,
while the Briton must merely dream upon
them, price no object.
Less common ,though in many respects
more important, is the comparative finan-
cial condition of educational institutions.
On American campuses, the general tenor
of feeling among students, faculty, and
administration is that governmental ogres
are driving higher education into the abyss
of poverty.
From this point, the matter appears larg-
ely relative.
The main building of the University of
Edinburgh is a great dark 18th century
quadrangle, blackened with the smole of a
hundred fifty years' coal fires. In this are
situated the administrative elements of
the University, the library, many classrooms,
lecture rooms, and even a psychology lab
or two,
In the neighborhood are several other
buildings housing various faculties, most of
them, adoptions from obscure original pur-
poses. For example, the Fine Art depart-
ment has made quite a good thing out of
a church.
To be sure, some new buildings, most
of them less than fifteen years old, have
been constructed on the southern edge of
town for the benefit of the science facul-
ties. But they are sadly in need of ex-
pansion, I understand, and funds are not
available.
The inadequacy of facilities struck me
first when I had occasion to use the gen-
eral library. Edinburgh is fortunate in hav-

ing a wonderful collection of books of the
17th and 18th centuries; through an ancient
agreement with the Stationer's Company
and various publishers, they were furnished
with many volumes as they were issued dur-
ing these times.
But the extreme cramping of the budget
during the last forty years has resulted in a
library of m'odern books that could be
matched by almost any small college in Mi-
chigan. And Edinburgh has the third larg-
est university library in Britain, trailing
only. Oxford and Cambridge.
The size of the teaching staff also dem-
onstrates the pervading indigence. Most
departments are severely limited to one
or two professors and a few assistants,
with no sign of the swarms of teaching
fellows evident at Michigan. This last
might be largely explained by the fact
that next to none. go on to post-graduate
work-again mostly a matter of money.
Edinburgh itself is an ancient town, of
course, and the feeling of antiquity seems
to be lurking, everywhere behind the fog
and rain. Everything is stone, and every-
thing, from the castle on its bluff overlook-
ing Princess Street to the newest semi-
detached house in Colinton, seems to be of
an age.
Like Ann Arbor, this isn't a pleasant
place in the wintertime. The steady diet
is rain and fog, and the greyness of the
climate is somehow augmented by the
austerity in living. Cold dampness is just
about everywhere except within the three
or four square feet heated by the gas fire
i ones room.
Lest the single impression be given that
Edinburgh is dull, poverty-stricken, and in
an advanced state of starvation, however, it
should be emphasized that these are first
impressions of an American, who, as I said
to begin with, is bound to be somewhat
spoiled. The life of a student is anything
but second-rate here. And that is a point
I will try to develop in another article.
(Next: Extra-curricular Matters)

Student Bookstore.. ..
To the Editor:
REALIZING the need for a non-
profit student bookstore on
this campus, and recognizing the
fact that the successful establish-
ment of a bookstore necessitates a
large capital expenditure, exten-
sive and conveniently located fa-
cilities, and full time personnel
with business experience, I am
presenting the following motion
before the Student Legislature
this evening:
Be it resolved:
that SL urges the establishment
of a nonprofit bookstore by the
Michigan Union in their proposed
addition; further, that, if neces-
sary, SL attempt to remove or
alter that bylaw of the Regents
that prohibits a bookstore in the
Union and requests the aid of
the Board of Directors of the Mi-
chigan Union in this pursuit.
After considerable though' on
the bookstore problem, I am firm-
ly convinced that the only way
we can ever get a bookstore isby
having it in the Union's new pro-
posed addition. Since many of the
plans for this addition have al-
ready been completed, they will
be costly to change. However, the
longer SL procrastinates in its
consideration and passage of my
motion, the more costly it will be
to change the plans.
I introduced this motion over a
year ago. Dave Belin presented a
similar motion almost two years
ago. At that time the Union pled-
ged its full support. However SL
has never passed the motion and
it has since been gathering dust.
Let's hope that they wake up to-
night and finally pass this motion
before more valuable time elapses!
-Bob Perry
On the IHC,. ..
To the Editor:
HARRY LUNN points out in his
editorial of Dec. 4 the irres-
ponsibilities of the Inter-House
Council. It would seem that there
is here a need for information
on Mr. Lunn's part which we
might give to him and to others
who have misconceptions about
quadrangle government. I.H.C. is
made up of the individual
quadrangle councils which in turn
are made up of members of the
individual houses who serve on
and are in close communication
with their house council-elected
representatives of the residents of
that house. This is a clear line of
responsibility and affords a repre-
sentative organization which can
be compared favorably with any
group on campus. The quad coun-
cil members are in constant con-
tact with the men theynrepresent
and consult their representives on
decisions made-a contact which
many other campus groups includ-
ing S.L. lack.
The rules made by the quad
council governing S.L. election
campaigning in the quads was
enacted only after frequent com-
plaint by the residents about hav-
ing campaign literature strewn
around the halls, rooms, and lava-
tories and to provide equal oppor-
tunities to all candidates in pre-
senting their qualities to the resi-
dents. It is significant that many
candidates (including Perry) did

certain events on campus in order
to benefit these events and en-
courage attendance. It is given
them as a special favor for these
events. Why then should we ex-
pect to receive late permission for
our parties which are given in
competition with these special
events?If a child gets a nickel
for doing an errand, should all
children be given a nickle? Per-
'haps the other groups who so
quickly ratified this proposal
could well have considered it at
greater length with the gain of
the campus as a whole considered
rather than the smaller gain of
being able to have their own
parties later. It would seem better
to push for several "free" nights
of late permission being added to
the university calendar so that in-
dividual parties might be had on
these nights.
-Lloyd Appell
Dan Peterson
Ambassador Aldrich
The appointment of Mr. Win-
throp Aldrich, the president of
the Chase National Bank, as Am-
bassador to Great Britain, was in-
evitable and, after some undigni-
fied haggling among wealthy Re-
publicans, has at last been con-
firmed.
London is still the plum of dip-
lomatic posts, though the ambi-
tions of those who seek it are not
always statesmanlike. Seen from
3,000 miles the Court of St. James
can appear to people who have
never been there as the main ex-
hibit of a Tudor pageant or the
very hub of a high Edwardian
life. Even in fairly recent times
there have been American Ambas-
sadors gravely disappointed by the
discovery that most of the popula-,
tion of Britain does not live in
hunting-lodges on the rolling golf-
courses ,of the South, and that a
commitment to improve relations
with Britain involves some per-
sonal knowledge of an industrial
population not very different from
the inhabitants of Pittsburgh and
Detroit
-Alistair Cooke from The Man-
chester Guardian Weekly
Sixty-Third Year
Edited and managed by students o1
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Crawford Young.......Managing Editor
Barnes Connable.......... City Editor
Cal Samra... E......,ditorial Director
Zander Hollander...... Feature Editor
Sid Klaus ...... Associate City Editor
Harand Britz.. ..... Associate Editor
Donna Hendleman.....Associate Editor
Ed Whipple.............Sports Editor
John Jenks. Associate Sports Editor
Dick Sewell..Associate Sports Editor
Lorraine Butler........Wowen's Editor
Mary Jane Mills, Assoc. Women's Editor
Business Staff
Al Green...........Business Manager
Milt Goetz........ Advertising Manager
Diane Johnston.... Assoc. Business Mgr.
Judy Loehnberg.... Finance Manager
Tom Treeger.......Circulation Manager
TePIbhonnR23-24-1

special period scheduled concurrently. Conflicts
ranged for by the instructor of the "special" class.

These regular examination periods have precedence over any

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS

w I

Chemistry 1, 3
English 1, 2
Psychology 31
English 112
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54 .
Great Books 1, Section 9
Sociology 51, 54, 60, 90
Political Science 1
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
61, 62
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
Russian 1
German 1, 2, 31, 11
Zoology 1

Monday, January 19
Wednesday, January 21
Wednesday, January 21
Wednesday, January 21
Friday, January 23
Friday, January 23
Saturday, January 24
Saturday, January 24
Monday, January 26
Tuesday, January 27
Tuesday, January 27
Tuesday, January 27
Wednesday, January 28

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must be ar-

, I

SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Business Administration 22, Monday, January 19
122, 223a, 223b
Business Administration 1 Tuesday, January 20
Business Administration 73, Wednesday, January 21
105, 143
Business Administration 13 Wednesday, January 21
(Econ. 173)
Business Administ~ration 255 Friday, January 23
Business Administration 162 Friday, January 23

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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit
in any unit of the University. For time and place of examina-
tions, see bulletin board in the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
College of Engineering
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
January 19 to January 29, 1953
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of
the first quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3209 East Engineering Build-
ing between January 5th and January 10th for instruction. To
avoid misunderstandings and errors each student should receive
notification from his instructot of the time and place of his ap-
pearance in each course during the period January 19 to Jan-
uary 29.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

_ - -- - - _ - ,-,a

ON THE

Washington Merry-Go-Round

with DREW PEARSON

WASHINGTON - One significant report
sent to General Eisenhower in mid-
Pacific is from the British, vigorously op-
posing any 'expansion of the Korean War,
The British protest came when the U.S.
sent a message to the U.K. shortly before
Ike left for Korea, stating that we had
under consideration a broadening of the
Korean operation by:
1-A blockade of Chinese ports.
2--Air Force intruder missions against the
Chinese mainland;
In brief, bombing beyond the Yalu River.
This proposal caused the British to have
fits. Prime Minister Churchill was adamant,
furious, and would have no part of it.
While the reasons for British opposition
were not set forth in detail, the reasons are
well known both in the Pentagon and to
those aboard the U.S.S. Helena. First, the
British fear any blockade of the China
ports would finish their sizeable trade with
China. Second, it would bring an abrupt
termination of their lease on Hong Kong

dent-elect Eisenhower would have all points
of view on hand during his Pacific trip.
The opposite point of view is undoubt-
edly in the secret MacArthur plan for
ending the Korean War--namely, bomb-
ing the Chinese mainland and blockading
Chinese ports. General MacArthur has
always favored these two moves, unques-
tionably had them in mind when he told
the National Association of Manufacturers
he had a secret plan for ending the Kor-
ean War,
HARRY'S LAST SUPPER
"RESIDENT TRUMAN invited every Cab-
inet member who had ever served with
him, except two, to his big farewell din-
ner last week. The guest of honor was Adlai
Stevenson.
Looking around the giant horseshoe
table at which were seated such old-
timers as Henry Wallace, Henry Morgen-
thau, Fanny Perkins and Frank Walker,
Secretary of Defense Bob Lovett remark-
ed:

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Time of Examination
Wednesday, January 21
Saturday, January 24
Tuesday, January 27
Monday, January 19
Tuesday, January 20
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Friday, January 23,
Monday, January 26
Wednesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 20
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Monday, January 19

TUESDAY

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