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December 07, 1952 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAE SEVEN

Big Ten Reveals
TV Preference
Conference Gives Dugger Another
Year of Football Eligibility for 'M'

Hurricane Back Leads
country's Ball-Carriers

CHICAGO - () - The power-
ful Big Ten yesterday too its
first stand on live televisio of
football games by voting for re-
gional control as opposed to the
NCAA's controversial nationally
restricted program.
The conference, however, made
it clear that the regional plan
merely was a preference and that
it has no desire for an all-out
fight with the National Collegiate
Athletic Association over TV pol-
icy.
*5 * *
K. L. (TUG) Wilson, Big Ten
commissioner, will introduce the
regional plan to the NCAA TV
committee which meets Jan. 5-6
in Washington, D.C., prior to the
organization's national conven-
tion.
There was little hope that re-
gional television will supplant
the national program.
"It's merely our preference,"
said Wilson. "Ana we will intro-
duce it as such to the NCAA
committee. The committee prob-
ably won't even\take it to the con-
vention."
WILSON explained that the Big
Ten, first of all, is and has always
been opposed to live football tele-
vision.
"But if there is live TV, then
we would like to see it done re-
gionilly," he added. "That would
mean that each of the NCAA's
eight districts would have its
own TV policy-a sort of states'
rights idea. The NCAA would
have little if nothing to do with
it."
Some Big Ten officials were
quick to point out that such a re-
gional program would reduce TV
revenue since proceeds would be
based on a local rather than na-
tional scale. But a more import-
ant disadvantage, they said, would
" be slicing into local football at-
tendance.
THUS, the Big Ten's regional
suggestion amounts only to a mild
slap at the present NCAA national
controlled program as being far
from the answer to fotball tele-
vision. They admit regional tele-
casting also is not the answer,
but probably the better plan of
the two.
"Local people best know their
local problems," said a Big Ten
spokesman "Under the regional
plan, each district could deter-
mine whether it wants limited,
unrestricted or no television at
all."
The Big Ten said if the NCAA
national program is continued in
1953, it should be done without
"further exceptions"-such as giv-
ing special permission for televis-
THE DINNER
BELL
delicious meals
reasonably
priced
808 SOUTH STATE ST.

ing when games are sell-outs. One
such case mentioned was the
NCAA's permission to telecast the
Notre Dame-Southern California
game following the Army-Navy
contest.
* * *
"WE WANT the NCAA to devel-
op a television plan as soon as
possible for. 1953 so we all will
know where we are going," said
Wilson.
Winding up its annual winter
meeting, the Big Ten designated
"sportsvision" of Chicago and
Los Angeles as official producer
of conference football films for
TV. The commerical group re-
ceived permission to cover all
Big Ten games and pool the
film for optional use of schools
for coaching review, local TV
releases or for a conference-wide
program authorized for such
uses as "game of the week."
The conference also approved
public announcement in the fu-
ture of violators oZ its code on re-
cruiting and subsidizing. Such an-
nouncement will come from Wil-
son's headquarters in Chicago as
cases are received and determined.
BIG TEN regulations provide
for warning, reprimanding, sus-
pending or expelling institutions
found guilty of infractions.
Penalties invoked the last
year and identity of the vio-
lators, as uncovered by inten-
sive investigations by Wilson,
are being concealed. The new
policy of providing names and
violations will be effective start-
ing tomorrow.
In other action, the Big Ten
approved:
1. A $50,000 travel budget for
Wisconsin's 44-man football squad,
coaching staff and official party
for the Rose Bowl (this amount
corresponds to payments to past
Big Ten participants at Pasade-
na).
2. ASSIGNED the conference
golf tournament to Wisconsin, at.
Maple Bluffs Country Club on
May 29-30.
3. Assigned the conference
tennis tournament to North.
western for May 28-30.
4. Re-established eligibility for
Arnold Campbell, Wisconsin base-
ball pitcher who played for
a tournament-winning industrial
league team in Milwaukee.
5. Granted an additional year
of eligiblity to football players Don
Dugger, Michigan guard, and Jim
Merrill, Ohio State tackle. Both
saw only a minute or so of compe-
tition in the 1950 season because
of injuries.

NEW YORK - () - The na-
tion's best ball-carrier in major
college football ranks during the
past season was Howard Waugh
of Tulsa's Hurricanes.
The 200-pound fullback gained
the most yardage, 1,372, and had
the best average per try-an av-
erage of 8.53 for every time he car-
ried the ball. He carried 164 times.
* * *
IN WINNING the national rush-
ing title, the Tulsa athlete became
one of four who have piled up
more than 1,000 yards a season
for two campaigns. He had a to-
tal of 1,118 yards last year.
This gave him 2,490 yards on
the ground for two straight sea-
sons--an all-time record for
that period.
Billy Vessels, Oklahoma's All-
America halfback, was second in
the rushing standings with 1,072
yards and an average of 6.66 yards.
A teammate, Buck McPhail, fol-
lows with 1,018 yards and a 6.32
average.
ONLY THREE other players
have piled up as much yardage
on the ground in a single season
as Waugh. Fred Wendt of the
Texas Mines holds the all-time
mark with 1,570. San Francisco's
Ollie Matson rushed for 1,566 and
Dbunny Goode piled up 1,399 for
Hardin-Simmons lastuyear.
The only other runners to
gain more than 1,000 yards in
two seasons were Eddie Price of
Jones, Gora
All-American
Swimmers
Burwell "Bumpy" Jones and
Ron Gora of the University of
Michigan have been named to the
1952 All America swimming team.
Jones gained recognition in the
individual medley, while Gora
was placed on the 400 yard free-
style relay team.
THE SQUAD named by the
Amateur Athletic Union included:
50-Yard Freestyle - Dick
Cleveland, Ohio State.
100-Yard Freestyle - Clark
Scholes, Michigan State.
220-440, 880 and Mile-Free-
styles-Ford Konno, Ohio State.
Backstroke-Yoshi Oyakawa,
Ohio State_ ..
Breaststroke - Bowen Strass-
forth, Iowa.
Springboard Diving - David
Browning, Texas
Platform' Diving - Major
Samuel Lee, U.S. Army.
Individual Medley-Burwell
Jones, Michigan.
300-Yard Medley Relay -
Oyakawa, Scholes, MSC, and
Jerry Holan, Ohio State.
400-Yard Freestyle Relay-
Scholes, Dick Cleveland, Ohio
State, Ron Gora, Jerry Donovan,
New Haven, and Konno.

Tulane, 1948-49; Mississippi's
John Dottley, 1949-50; and
Rudy Mobley of Hardin-Sim-
mons, 1942 and 1946.
Waugh put on a tremendous
rush to gain the national rushing
championship. He added 628 yards
in his last three games.
VESSELS and McPhail became
the first teammates to go over
1,000 yards on the ground in a
single campaign.

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The leaders:
RU
1. Waugh, Tulsa
2. Vessels, Oklahoma
3. McPhail, Oklahoma
4. Marlow, Alabama
5. Clasby, Harvard
6. Ameche, Wisconsin
7. Williams, Hard-Simm.
8. Filipski, Villanova
9. Curran, Tempe St.
10. Olszewski, California

ushes Yds Avg
164 1372 8.37

161
161
176
205
205
180
138
114
160

1072
1018
950
950
946
898
889
870
845

6.66
6.32
5.40
4.63
4.61
4.99
6.44
7.63
5.28

Soph Center
Stars in MSC
Cage Victory

EAST LANSING - (A') - A bat-
tle of sophomore centers here last
night saw a youngster with the
captivating name of Bob (All-
American Boy) Armstrong win the
decision to give Michigan State a
62-51 victory in its basketball
opener with Marquette.
Armstrong, six-foot-eight and a
high school sensation from the
Dutch community of Holland, was
playing his first game as a start-
er for MSC coach Pete Newell.
* * *
GOING against him for Mar-
quette was Russ Wittberger, a six-
foot-six incher who saw consider-
able game experience as a fresh-
man last year.
Wittberger, who tried to car-
ry Marquette on his back, was
high for his team with 21 points.
In the third quarter he made 10
points and was the only Mar-
quette scorer. Armstrong pushed
in 19 points in the first three
quarters and then was retired
when Michigan State led 44-34.
After the score was tied 14-all
at the end of the first quarter
Michigan State edged ahead 29-24
at the half. MSC kept building in
the third period, that saw Witt-
berger the only Marquette scorer.
* * *
MICHIGAN STATE played tight
control ball in the first three quar-
ters. The game opened up in the
closing quarter as Newell started
sending in his substitutes on the
strength of a 10-point lead.
Al Ferrara, with 14 points, and
Pete Stackhouse, with 13, both
forwards, were the other effec-
tive scorers for Michigan State.
Bob Van Vooren, with eight
points, was second high for Mar-
quette.
Marquette had previously lost
to Michigan, 80-72, and to Wis-
consin, 76-55.

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On December 9th, the staff of the 'Ensian
will canvass the following housing units
along with the house salesmen:
West Quadrangle
South Quadrangle
East Quadrangle
Fletcher Hall
Couzens Hall
Stockwell Hall
Mosher and Jordan Halls
Alice Lloyd Hall
Betsy Barbour
Helen Newberry
Martha Cook
The price of the 'Ensiian is now $5.00 and
will increase early next semester to $6.00.
"Staff Day" will give students in the above

ri

Fountain Pens
Greeting Cards
Stationery
Office Supplies
Typewriters
W /C Tape &
Wire Recorders
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files
re.rt+ , mnr

L'
-,
« e"

I

MORRILL'S Phone
314 S. State 7177
Open Saturday till 5 P.M.
Except on Home Games

Reduce,

VULCANS
Offer YOU
up to
$$00
SAVINGS
on
d Rate

i

EUROPE budget Tours
OHRTOURS
MEXICO * HAWAII - JAPAN * S4. AMER.
AND MEET THE PEOPLE
EUROPE: Unique first class spring tours.
Low cost summer tours designed for young-
er people - MEXICO: Summer session*.
JAPAN: Study Cruise Tour* via A. P. L. *
EUROPE: Music festival HAWAII*
tour* * $. AMER.: Study SUMMER SESSION
Cruise To3ur* via Moore. STUDY TOUR
McCormack Lines * ALAS. Girls 17-25,
KAN tours. 'college credit chaprone..
a given.

houses

a chance to purchase their All-

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