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December 07, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER'7, 1952

mosoft

Sextet Trips St. Lawrence, 6-1;

* * * *

Brawls, Stellar Goalies
Feature Hockey Opener

4>

(4

(Continued from Page 1)
ed in the head when he tried tot
break up the brawl.t
The fisticuffs were just whatt
was needed to touch off a per-
feet evening. Despite ragged
passing and several fluffed scor-
ing opportunities, the Wolver-,
ines flashed enough brillianceI
to convince the 3,500 in the
crowd that they will duplicate
last year's championship per-t
formance.i
Telly Mascarin, wing on the
pucksters third line was the first
to flash the red light for Michigan
in the 1952 season. Mascarin cag-
ed the rubber on passes from Doug
Mullen and Reg Shave with 5:54
gone in the first period.
THAT WAS ALL of the scoring
in that frame, and the Heyliger-
men returned to the ice for thec
second period out in front by a
narrow 1-0 margin. But that sit-
uation didn't last very long. I
At 2:39 of the second periodj
flashy John McKennell caged
the first of his two goals of the
evening on passes from Earl
Keyes and Johnny Matchefts.
Then at 13:15 Doug Philpott
slammed one from in close past
Larrie goalie Bill Sloan.
With St. Lawrence defenseman
Wally Behan in the penalty box
for tripping, Jim Haas slammed a
20-footer into the twines behind
Sloan on a solo flight. Keyes clos-
ed the second period scoring as he
converted on brilliant passes from
Matchefts and McClellan at 18:36.
McKENNELL, smooth - skating
Toronto senior, tallied Michigan's
sixth goal in the third period as
he picked up a loose puck in the
Wolverines defensive zone and out-
maneuvered a trio of Larries as
he slipped the disc over the goal
line. The redhead's antics brought

the crowd to its feet as he coun-
tered his second goal with both
teams short two hands as a result
of the brawl three minutes before.
SLOAN TURNED away 46 Mich-
igan shots, and it could be said in
defense of the six goals that he
allowed that he didn't get very
much aid from the Larrie defend-
ers. At the other end of the rink,
Willard Ikola looked equally sharp,
turning away St. Lawrence's scor-
ing threats.
Although aided immeasurably
by fine defensive work of Shave,
Haas, McClellan and Louie Pao-
latto, the slick net-minder from
Eveleth, Minnesota got credit
for 35 saves-with a dozen on
the sensational side.
The Larries looked a little tired
and logy last night-perhaps be-
cause of their three games this
week. Langill, the number one
star of the Saints was additionally
hampered by a fractured nose, suf-
fered in Friday's game with Mich-
igan State.
FIRST PERIOD: 1-Michigan: Masca-
rin (Mullen, shave) 5:54.
Penalties: Michigan-Paolatto, (two;
boarding, cross-checking); McClellan,
(tripping); Matchefts, (slashing); all
two minutes. St. Lawrence-Stefano-
wicz, (slashing)-two minutes.
SECOND PERIOD: 2-Michigan, Mc-
Kennell (Keyes, Matchefts) 2:39,
3-Michigan, Philpott (Hass, Mullen)
13:16, 4-Michigan, Haas (unassisted)
16:34, 5-Michigan, Keyes (Matchefts,
McClellen) 18:36.
Penalties: Michigan-Cooney (two,
tripping, misconduct)-two and ten
minutes. St. Lawrence - Lospitalier
(tripping), Behan (tripping)-both two
minutes.
THIRD PERIOD: 6-St. Lawrence, Ste-
fanowicz (Langill) 2:03, 7-Michigan,
McKennell (unassisted) 7:15.
Penalties: Michigan-Mascarin, Mc-
Clellen (fightingand match miscon-
duct)-five minutes and banishment
from game. St. Lawrence-Behan, Lund-
berg (fighting and match misconduct)
-five minutes and banishment from
game.

Late Sports
Results
BASKETBALL
Florida State U. 68, Georgia Techers
63
Ohio Wesleyan 105, Wilmington 86
Michigan Normal 78, Hillsdale 52
Western Michigan 95, Northwestern 79
Butler 67, Purdue 61
Notre Dame 71, Indiana 70
Murray 92, Tennessee Tech 82
Iowa State 70, South Dakota 47
Vanderbilt 90, Virginia 83
West Virginia 89, Washington & Lee
83
Findlay 82, Morris Harvey 79
Quantico Marines 76, Villanova 74
NYU 80, Boston College 71
Minnesota 79, Bradley 63
Central Michigan 68, Milwaukee State
49
Ohio State 81, St. Louis 71
Wayne 103, Western Ontario 64
North Carolina 80, Richmond 64
Wake Forest 91, Duke 86
Michigan State 62, Marquette 51
Ursinus 82, Susquehanna 69
Washington College 59, Bridgewater
48
LaSalle 87, Niagara 76
Toledo U. 47, Adrian 26
Penn 70, Maryland 53
Fordham 71, Columbia 65
Cornell 75, Alfred 42
Georgia 57, Clemson 55
PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY SCORES
Detroit 2, Chicago 0
Boston 2, Montreal 1
New York 2, Toronto 2
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
U. of New Mexico 28, Utah State 0
Texas Tech 54, North Carolina State
7.
Maryland State 10, North Carolina
U. of Huston 20, Wyoming 0

Five Stos Pitt
Flurry of Baskets in Final Period Wins
Second Encounter of Season for Cagers

(Continued from Page 1)
verines' Ray Pavichevich and Paul
Groffsky came right back with a
lay-in and foul shot, respectively,
to go within three points of the
faltering Panthers.
** *
ZERNICH followed with another
charity toss, and then Codwell
really got to work.
The lanky forward split the
nets with a jump shot, tied the
battle up with a couple of foul
shots, and then shot his team
into the lead with a long one-
hander.
Panther center Don Virostek
and Zernich knotted the score
again with free throws, but Groff-
sky brought the roaring crowd to
its feet with a beautiful hook shot
that put the home-town boys back
into the lead for good, 68-66, with
five minutes remaining.
ART BOYD, Pitt forward nar-
rowed the gap with another free
throw, but from then on the Wol-
verines pulled steadily away as
Groffsky and Codwell, who both
finished the night with 16 count-
ers, added ten more points be-
tween them.
Perigo's lads began the non-
conference tilt just as they end-
ed it, rolling up a 21-14 bulge
in the first quarter.
Guard Pavichevich who hit for
17 points in the ragged, foul-mar-
red encounter with Pitt's Zernich,
paced the early surge with five
field goals.
* * *
THE PANTHERS, led by guard
Dick Deitrick and Zernich, who
racked up 19 markers to share
scoring honors with Michigan's
Don Eaddy, meshed 9 straight
points, though, to move into a
25-21 advantage.
The Wolverines came right
back with nine more counters
to regain the lead at 30-25.

Then Pittsburgh got hot again,,
knotted the score at 30, and went
on to hold a slim 39-37 margin at
the half.
* * *
MICHIGAN again moved into a
short-lived 43-41 advantage in the
early minutes of the third period
on a pair of long shots by Eaddy,
but the visitors hurtled back into
a lead they maintained until the
final quarter Wolverine onslaught.
Michigan needed 103 shots from
the field to turn in its 85 pomnt
total, hitting 33 of the attempts
for a 32 per cent completion per-
centage. Pitt sank 27 of 79 tries
for an average of 35 per cent.
The Wolverines were really off
at the charity line, connecting on
only 19 of 37 free throw attempts
for a 53 per cent average. Pitts-
burgh made good on 24 of 38 foul
shots, a slightly better percentage
of 61 per cent.

PITTSBURGH
Zernich F
Deitrick F
Ruschel F
Virostek C
Burch G
Boyd G
Palesco G
Totals
MICHIGAN
Kauffman F
Mead F
Codwell F
Groffsky C
Schlicht C
Eaddy G
Pavichevich G
Lawrence G
Totals

G
5
4
4
4
8
27
G
2
3
6
6
0
7
8
1
33

F
9
3
0
3
4
5
0
24
F
3
0
4
4
0
5
1
2
19
23
17

PF TP
4 19
4 11
o 0
3 7
4 12
2 13
4 16
21 78
PF TP
4 7
4 6
3 16
4 16
0 0
3 19
3 17
3 4
24 85
16-78
31--85

Pittsburgh
MICHIGAN

14
21

25
16

Free throws missed: Pittsburgh-
Zernich 3, Deitrick 2, Virostek 2,
Burch 4, Boyd 3. MICHIGAN-Kauf-
man 3, Mead 2,rCodwen 5, Groffsky
3, Eaddy 3, Lawrence.

WILLARD IKOLA, HAWK-EYED WOLVERINE GOALTENDER

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TRADE INDS BLOWING?
Waiver Vote Deadlocked, Frick To Rule

ONE STOP at
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takes care of all 31
and fast!

PHOENIX, Ariz. - (P) - Both
major leagues passed the execu-f
tive council's new bonus rule and
voted to retain the present high
school rule yesterday but they
tossed the controversial two-league
waiver proposal into the lap of
commissioner Ford Frick for de-t
cision at today's joint meeting.
Each league took the action sep-
arately. As both agreed on the bo-
nus and high school rules, their
action at tomorrow's joint ses-
sion will become merely a formal-
ity.
* * *
THEY ARE SPLIT on the pro-
posal to require waivers in both
major leagues after July 15. The
American turned thumbs down on
the idea today after the nationali
passed an amended version, withc
a June 15, deadline, at yester- I
day's session.2

The waiver rule was resigned
to stop big money deals in late
season such as the New York Yan-
kees have been making with Na-
tional league clubs. Johnny Mize,
Johnny Sain, Johnny Hopp and
Ewell Blackwell, among others,
came to the yanks in $50,000 and
$100,000 transactions after being
waived out of the National al-
June 15 trading deadline.
With the owners up to their
necks in legislation and legal
double talk, there was little trade
gossip in the hotel lobbies. The
foot-sore baseball mob, working
up a good set of bunions from a
week of lobby standing, was
worn out.
Fred Haney, veteran Hollywood
manager, remained the No. 1
choice for the vacant Pittsburgh
managing job with no announce-
ment yet.

A Brooklyn-Boston deal by
which Dodgers would get pitcher
Warren Spahn and outfielder Sid
Gordon for outfielders Andy Paf-
ko, Carl Furillo and first baseman
Gil Hodges was on the fire.
The clubs were reported near
agreement on the key men in the
swap but undecided on the sec-
ondary and farm players to be
included on both sides.

Defense Stands Out, as Bowl
Bound Gators Down Wildcats.

0

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AXMAS CARDS
SBooks for Adults
Books for Children
-
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Photo Albumss
Address Books
Stationery
-IL
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1216 South University... Phone 3-4436

GAINESVILLE, Fla.-(P)-Rick
Casares threw a surprise 29-yard
pass to Papa Hall the first time
Florida got the ball yesterday and
it set the stage for a resounding
27-0 victory for the Gator-Bowl
bound Gators over Kentucky.
Charlie LaPradd, Florida's first
All-American in a quarter century,
was the heart of a defensive line
that had a large part in the vic-
tory, as it has in the other six the
Gators won.
* * *
THE DEFENSE shook Kentucky
loose from the ball for five fum-
bles and one pass interception.
The victory gave Florida sixth
place in the Southeastern Con-
ference standings and the Ga-
tors' best winning record since
1929. They will carry a 7-3 mark
into the Gator Bowl against Tul-
sa.
Principally off a great running
crew of Casares, Hall and Buford
Long, Florida went into the game
a one-touchdown favorite.
* * *
THE DECISIVE victory over a
Kentucky team that tieddTennes-
see its last time out and hadn't
lost since midseason was the re-
sult of an unexpected passing at-
tack featuring Casares, Doug

Dickey and Fred Robinson in the
throwing roles.
Casares, Long and Sam Oos-
terhoudt each scored a Florida
touchdown on short runs and
Robinson threw 17 yards to end
Curtis King for the other. Ca-
sares converted three times.
S t e v e Meilinger, Kentucky's
great all-around athlete, gave Flo-
rida the most trouble as expected.
He ran for 110 yards in 17 plays
from quarterback and halfback,
but the Wildcats missed him at his
natural position-end-and com-
pleted only one pass in 10 tries.
That was a 12-yard toss by Larry
Jones after Florida substitutes had
taken over.
KENTUCKY outdistanced Flor-
ida's highly regarded runners, 258
yards to 137, but when the Wild-
cats came anywhere near Florida's
goal the defense stood like 11
rocks. The closest they got.was the
Florida 22 on a fumble by Gator
freshman Harry Wing in the first
quarter.
Four plays later Florida took ov-
er on downs at the 26.
- - ---

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Deck the Halls with Montezuma
GARGOYLE
Out December 10

1

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