100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 23, 1952 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE FIVE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

from the Sidelines
...By Dick Sewell

Davies Lone Wolverine Athlete
To Garner Olympic Gold Medal

Major League Standings

ANiE R

N THE OCTOBER ISSUE of Sport Magazine there appears what
the editors call "one of the most important and revealing stories
Sport has ever published. . . " Its title: Gene Filipski Says He Was
Railroaded Out of West Point.
Filipski was one of the famous-or infamous-90 who were
dropped from the Academy in August, 1951 for "cribbing" in viola-
tion of the honor code. More than that, he was then, and is now (for
Villanova) a top-flight football performer. His cry is "Gee, ma, all
the boys were doing it," and in weaving his tale he unwittingly casts
some nasty reflections on his own ethical standards and football's
place at West Point.
Although admitting that what he and the others did was morally
wrong, Filipski later rationalizes that "cribbing as compared to out-
right cheating in the classroom is like shaving points in basketball
compared to downright throwing a game. Neither should be tolerated,
but there are shades of difference." Are there really, Gene?
Football and West Point ...
Football's role in undermining the West Point honor system is
plainly evident. Says Filipski, "It's nice to talk about the high ethics
of the honor code, but when it comes to the point where you know
what you say is going to get a fellow tossed out of school, you're not
always worried about honor. Especially when you've been taught that
the football team is something big at the Point."
Stating that nine months of the year football was played or
thought about, which, he says, "was a little too much," Filipski
points out that the time-short gridders were more susceptible to
cribbing than any other group. As he puts it, "You grab at short-
cuts."
All things considered, it appears that football was getting a little
out of hand at West Point. Obviously something is out of kilter when
gridiron glory makes honor unimportant. It is equally obvious that
football overemphasis is not the only reason for the cribbing scandals.
A However, a discussion of the other factors involved would be out of
place in a sports column. Philosphy 61 (Ethics) classes might do well
to study the whole problem.
Attention Olympic Committee
The same issue of Sport contains a worthy suggestion by Biff
Bennett which deserves the careful attention of the United States
Olympic Committee. His plan calls for the Committee to leave at
least three berths on the Olympic squad open until the last moment
and fill them by appointment.
It has long been one of the tragedies of sport that often some
of our outstanding track and field performers have missed per-
forming in the Games because of an unlucky moment in the
Trials or because of a temporary disabling injury.
If Bennett's proposal 'should be adopted, men like ex-Wolverine
shotputter Charley Fonville and miler Gil Dodds who missed in 1948,
and distanceman Don Gehrmann and hurdler Craig Dixon who
were left behind this year, could make the team via the appointment
route.

*

By DICK LEWIS
There was a broad grin across
the face of American Olympic
swimming coach Matt Mann one
day last August.
Not only was it the realization
that his Olympic charges had vir-
tually swept all events, but it was
a proud-papa feeling four years in
the making that gave the genial
Michiian swimming mentor some-
thing else to smile about.
* * *
FOR MINUTES earlier, Austra-
lia's John Davies, Wolverine tank
captain last winter, salvaged the
lone gold medal won by a Michi-
gan athlete as he sped to Olympic
record time in the 200-yard breast-
stroke.
And Davies had to use all that
Mann had taught him in a four-
year span to beat off arch-rival
Bowen Stassforth by a scant
three-tenths of a second in the
new mark of 2.36.8.
Davies began his glory road with
a 2:39.7 victory in a qualifying
heat, and then went on to tie the
Olympic standard of 2:36.8 in the
semifinals. He had previously fin-
ished fourth in the finals of the
1948 World games.
THE AUSSIE stroker was not
the only Michigan athlete repre-
sented at Helsinki. Four Maize and
Blue track stars and two natators
also made their presence felt at
the Olympiad.
Most successful of these was
giant Roland Nilsson, competing
in the field events for Sweden.
Nilsson finished fifth in the
shot put as he hurled the 16-
pound ball 54 .feet, 3.59 inches.
He also captured the seventh
spot in the discus throw with a
heave of 165 feet, 1.42 inches.
Team-mate Roy Pella, a Cana-
dian student at Michigan, grabbed
fourteenth spot in tne discuss with
a toss of 153 feet, 1.02 inches. Pella
reached 157 feet, 3% inches in the
Canadian Olympic trials, for a
Dominion record.

I

TEACHER AND STAR PUPIL-Matt Mann, Michigan and 1952
Olympic Swimming Coach, and John Davies, Wolverine breastroke
ace who swam for his native Australia, were both winners at
Helsinki. Mann's United States natators won the team title
and Davies won the 200-meter breastroke in Olympic record
time.

I* * *
TWO OTHER Canadian track
luminaries advanced in the Games.
Junior John Ross, the Big Ten
mile champion, came home fourth
in a qualifying heat of the 1500-
meterhtest with a 3:55.2 clocking,
but then faded to 4:00.6 and a
twelfth place finish in the semis.
Michigan track captain-elect
Jack Carroll ran second to Ja-
maica's Arthur Wint in 48 sec-
onds flat to move to the second

round of the 400-meter run.
Here he hit the tape third to
Ohio State's Mal Whitfield in
0:47.7.
Carroll bettered his clocking by
three tenths of a second in the
semifinals but had Wo be satisfied
with fifth place.
ODDLY ENOUGH, no Wolverine
athletes made the trip with the
American track squad to Finland.

Canadian Don McEwen, fabulous
Michigan distance star, stayed,
home with an ailing stomach.
Sophomores Ron Gora and
Burwell (Bumpy) Jones surviv-
ed the Olympic swimming try-
outs in Astoria, New York, last
July to put up quite a fight over-
seas.
Gora, an ineligible freshman
from Chicago last semester, tri-
umphed in a qualifying heat of
the 100-meter free style in 58
seconds, won a semifinal heat in
0:57.7, but finished eighth in the
finals with an 0:58.8 timing.
Clarke Scholes of Michigan State
garnered the gold medal in this
contest in 0:57.4.
Jones, national individual med-
ley champion, anchored the sec-
ond-string 800-meter relay squad
which took the semifinals in 8:50.9.
Five other Matt Mann products
appeared in the New York Olym-
pic trials. Jim McKevitt, Don Hill,
Jim White and Wally Jeffries
were all eliminated in the prelim-
inaries.
Graduate student Bernie Kahn
notched fifth in the 100-meter
back stroke finals, coming within
San arms length of third place fin-
isher Aden Stack.
use the New
MICROTOMIC
-the Absolutely Uniform
DRAWING PENCIL
(Absolute uniformity means drawings without
-weak spots'- clean, legible detail. Famous
for smooth, long-wearing leads. Easily distin-
guished by bull's-eye degree stamping on3
sides of pencil. At your campus store I

ly
z

NeCw York(
Cleveland
Chicago
Philadelphia
Boston
Washington
St. Louis
Detroit
Y EST
Cleveland 6,

RICAN LEA(;UE
rN [L pet.
,M 58 .608
90 60 .600
738 '7t .523
r f 3 t .513
75 73 .507
76 '74 .507
6 t 87 .412
49 l100 .329
{:DA S ESLA

G 13
1214
14
15
15
29
41'.-

rERDAY s RESULTS
Detroit 3
W aJ1

Chic.go at Cleveland-Dobson
vs Garcia(2-0

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No Games Scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at New York 2-Johnson (6-1)
and Burdette (6-10) vs Koslo (9-7) an4
Maglie (17-8)
Philadelphia at Brooklyn 2, twinight--
Drews (13-14) and Simmons (13-8)
vs. Loes (13-8) and Rutherford (6-7)
Cincinnati at St. Louis-Perkowski (12-
9) vs Miller (6-2)
New York at Boston-Sain (9-6) vs Kin-
der (5-5)

(13-10)

Washington at Philadelphia-Masterson
(10-7) vs Shantz (24-7)
St. Losis at Detroit (Night)-Pillette
(10-13) vs Wiglht. ("-11)

NATIONAL
Brooklyn 94
New York 88
St. Louis 85
Philadelphia 83
Chicago 75
Cincinnati 66
Boston 63
Pittsburgh 41

LEAGUE
L Pct.
54 .635
60 .595
63 .574
65 .561
76 .487
82 .446
85 .426
110 .272

GS
6
9
11
20!4
28
34
54%4

Now in Stock

FAST WRITING .MAGIC
EASY WRITING MAGIC)
MAGIC MARGIN {t

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - e1

-

I,
_ _ _

Ailt

, i
.i
n
, I

i

1. . from .
STAEBLER BEAUTY

SALON

a discriminating shop for discriminating women
601 EAST LIBERTY

Na I
+t
w
.,
;i
i
I
,,,
.,,,I
;
,
ryi

..:<.:: :.:...... _
:.::...:;:r..,.. THE NEVf
ROYAL
P ORTABLEI
s
11 S W. Liberty St,
Phone 8950

I.

I

1v

Dodgers May
Clinch Pennant
SittingDawn
BROOKLYN (A-The Brooklyn
Dodgers have a good chance to
clinch the National League pen-
nant today sitting down.
Needing only one more victory
or one defeat -by the New York
Giants to qualify for the World
Series, the Dodgers will sit out an
afternoon Giants-Boston double-
header before playing a twi-night
twin bill with Philadelphia.
s S "
SHOULD THE GIANTS lose one
of the two games with the Braves,
pressure immediately would be
taken off Brooklyn's manager
Any student interested in try-
ing out for the varsity track
team should see Don Canham or
Elmer Swanson any afternoon
this week at Ferry Field.
-Don Canham
Charley Dressen, who could then
start resting his weary pitching
staff for the Series, starting Oct.
1, against either the New York
Yankees or Cleveland.
If the Giants win, clinching cer-
emonies for the Dodgers would be
delayed until they can win one of
their six remaining games.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
WELCOME
STUDENTS!
Specializing in
*Crew Cuts
* Flat Tops
* New Yorkers
* Jollywoods
Hairstyling to Please
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theater

19

ESKIE SAYS:

I like to shop
at Calkins-Fletcher

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
RAGU..A ~ BRING QUICK RESULTS

cause they really have the STUFF!
PIPE SPECIAL!
Famous WEBER
IMPORTED BRIAR PIPES
You'll want several at this
unusual
- a n'
$7.50 values
special $;19
Sir Walter Raleigh
MIXTURE 15c

V W
What'll it be in college styles,
deerstalker hat or a jacket
with the belt in the back?
When it comes to fashion,
Esky knows the answer ..
Just as he knows what's right
in good grooming and what's "writ
for good school work. And Esky say
look to the name brands listed
at right. They're the same ones
you saw advertised in Esquirea
"Back to Campus" suggestions.
Check what you have....see wh
you need. Here are your
best buys of the new trm.

IN

ESQUIRE and Ca/kiin lletcioe

Too!

Snaps ots
Brownie Movie Camera'
(made by Kodak)
only $43.30
I II ' pa I

SENSATIONAL
SHAVING
BARGAI N I0
NE 7
Gillette ShPerSpeed
$-0Rur od
14-Slade Gillette Dispenser

FOR MEN!
the luxury
hair dressing
60t and $1
Handsomeplastic
ueeze dispemser
~f
FO R M E N
St y .. $having otionm
Mon's Talc, Mons
Cologne, $3.00 plus taxm;. .

.S
ysa
as
hat

APPAREL'
Air-O-Magic Sf O0\
Alligator Rainwear
i Allen Edmonds Shot
American Gentlemen
e ara cuta Rainwear -
Bass "Weejuas"
ostonlan Shoes
ritish Walkers
california Sportweat,
atalina Sweaters
hamp Hats
ity Club Shoes
Clarks of England tee
dopers Hosiery
oopers Sportswear
Cricketeer Jackets
Cush-N-Crepe Soles
utter Cravat Ties
aks Slacks -
obbs Hats
rexel Socks
ynel Processed oth
agleclothes
dgerton Shoes
alcon "chill-Doger Jeeket
leld & Stream klaetlw.
lorsheim Shoes
pater Sportswear
reeman Shoes
ammonton Park Clothes
Harriswear Stormoets
arris Tweeds
House of Crosby Square hoeS
Interwoven Socks
Jantzen Sweaters
Jarman Shoes
A. 0. Juilliard (Blamr Stripe Jq
by White Stag)
Kroy Processed Soos
Lackawanna Slacks
Lamb Knit Sweaters
tee Hats
lLos Angeles Sportogs "un and
ansfield Shoes
Marlboro Shirts
1asterbilt Slacks
)B.Laskin--(Mouton Itae *Oo
Mavest sport Jackets
Mayfair Slacks
Ni*lum (Aircraft Jacket by stirtr4
Nunn-Bush Shoes
1Nyta-Q-Cord Underwear
Pacific Mills (Surr"1wlll i*a
Paris Gartersy
'phi-Bates Shoes
Pleetway Pajamas
Portls Hats
SRand Shoes
Rajafome Soles
Rainfair Raincoats
bert Reis Underweet
Sportswear by Revere
Roblee Shoes
Rock Knit Topcoats
After Six Evening Wear
Rugby Knitting Mills
Simmons "Mr. Slim" Tie Wips
Schaefer Suits
Scully Suede Jacket'
Shelby Shoes
a rt cf ect
tetson Hats
ttormster Coats
undial Shoes
an ort C is a a l
wank Accessories
jayfor-Made Shoes
ji1mely Clothes
op-O-Mart Clothes
in Heusen Shirts
jWalk-Over Shoes
ttWembiey Ties
Westbrooke Ciothee
Weyenberg Shoes
4Yings Shirts
fiiinthrop Shoes
:, Yorktown" Shots ~4~nor
i TOLETRIES
jYitalis Hair Tonle
f Suave Hair Dresting
~Gillette Razor & Dispenser
ennen Cream Hair Oil
1~eaforth Shave Lotion
LEATHER & LUSOAU
Samsonite Lugge
i topp Kit
SCar Sac
Prince Gardner "IM Leather ANSU~

: :.; -

I

I

FOR FUN AND
RELAXATION .. .

r1n If Drric

I

i

I

I

I

Ii

III

I

I

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan